Your Text Here

Vermilion Parish Schools

Unit 2:   ELA Reading Essentials

Prekindergarten Unit 2

 

Oral Language Development Activities

Goal: Asks questions of an adult or a child

 

Asking questions builds on the child’s ability to answer questions asked by others. It is an important language skill because it gives the child a way to think actively about stories.

 

Sample Activities

 

1. The teacher says, “I will ask you a question. After you answer, you can ask me a question, and I will answer your question.” This activity does not need to be linked to a story. It can relate to anything familiar in a child’s daily life. The idea is to get children into the habit of posing questions.

 

2. After the same story has been read repeatedly, the teacher says, “I will ask you a question about the story I just read to you. After you answer, you can ask me a question about the story and I will answer your question.” It is important to ask very specific questions that are easy to answer from the facts given in the story.

 

3. After the same story has been read repeatedly, the teacher says, “Now turn to the person next to you. Ask that person a question about the story. The other person will answer and then ask a different question.”

 

Storybook Reading Activities

Goal: Recognize and use conventional book handling skills

 

Sample Activities

 

1. The teacher selects a big book and places it on an easel. “Let’s look at how we start to read a book.” The teacher then points to the left side of the book and says, “This side of the book is closed. It’s always on this side.” The teacher then points to the right side of the book, fans the pages, and says, “This side of the book is open.” The teacher places one hand on the cover and says, “This is the front of the book.” The teacher then says, “I open it this way to find the story. Here is the first page. I turn the pages like this. When I get to the last page, that’s the end of the story.” The teacher then turns the book so the back cover is facing the children. “This is the back of the book.” This modeling is repeated for several big books over the course of a week.

 

2. The teacher gathers the children in front of an easel on which a big book has been placed in the correct position. “Who can show me the front of the book?” the teacher asks. A student comes to the easel and places a hand on the front cover. “Who can show me the back of the book?” the teacher asks next. Another child comes forward to demonstrate and turns the book over to do so. “Where can I find the first page?” the teacher asks. “Show me, ____.”

 

3. The teacher gathers the children in front of an easel on which a big book has been placed on its side or backwards. “Do I need to move this book to read it?” the teacher asks. The teachers then asks the students how the book needs to be moved in order to get it into the correct position. 

 

4. The teacher places a picture book on a table in front of the child, making sure that the book is not in the right position for opening. The teacher says, “Show me the front of the book. Show me the back of the book. Show me the first page.”

 

Phonological Awareness Instruction

Goal: Produce rhyming words

 

Sample Activities

 

1. The teacher selects a word with many common rhymes and identifies one of the rhyming words. The teacher then asks the children to supply another. For example, the teacher might say, “Let’s start with the word sat. I will say a word that rhymes with sat. Listen – hat. Yes, hat rhymes with sat. Who can tell me another word that rhymes with sat?” After calling on one child, the teacher might say to the other children, “Touch your nose if you think that word rhymes with sat. Remember that rhyming words are the same at the end.”

 

2. The teacher selects a word with many common rhymes and asks the children to supply a word that rhymes with it. For example, the teacher might say, “I’m thinking of the word hot. Who can tell me another word that rhymes with hot?” After calling on one child, the teacher might say to the other children, “Touch your nose if you think that word rhymes with hot.”

 

3. The teacher reads aloud two rhyming lines from a simple poem that the children have not heard, leaving out the last word. For example: “I am going to read to you, but I will not read the very last word. It is a rhyming word. See if you can guess the last word.

            I like to feed my cat.

            And now she’s very ___. 

If they cannot produce a rhyming word, the teacher suggests two words that logically fit but only one of which rhymes (e.g., fat, full). “Which word do you think is the right one?” the teacher asks. “Remember that it must rhyme.”

 

Work With Letters

Goal: Sing alphabet

 

Learning the alphabet is a fairly complex task because the letters are abstract. Children tend to learn the alphabet more quickly and easily with the support of the cadence of a song.  There are many versions of alphabet songs, and teachers should choose the one that is most attractive, appropriate, and coherent with other curriculum choices.  Once the song is chosen, though, it is best to keep it consistent across the prekindergarten curriculum.

 

Sample Activities

 

1. The children first listen to the alphabet song many times, either on tape or CD or sung by the teacher.  The children can dance during the song or engage in other gross-motor responses, either freely or with the direction of the teacher.

 

2.  The teacher helps the children to learn to sing the alphabet song.  Once the children have listened several times, they can focus their attention on specific portions of the song.  The teacher can model singing each portion, then have the children practice each portion until they master it.

 

3.  The teacher engages the children in singing the entire alphabet song, along with support from the teacher’s voice or from a tape or CD version.  During the singing, the children can dance or engage in other gross-motor responses.
 

Prekindergarten Unit 2 Assessment

 

The purpose of assessment in this unit is to plan further instruction.  This assessment can be completed during the course of regular instruction, with the teacher focusing on the responses of individual children, or it can be completed in an individual format, with the teacher interacting with each child individually.

 

Unit 2 Assessment

Oral Language Development:  Asks questions of an adult or child

After the teacher asks a question about daily life,

  • The child cannot ask a similar question.

  • The child asks a similar question using an incomplete sentence.

  • The child asks a similar question using a complete sentence.

After the teacher asks a question about a familiar story,

  • The child cannot ask a similar question.

  • The child asks a similar question using an incomplete sentence.

  • The child asks a similar question using a complete sentence.

When the teacher asks a child to ask a partner a question about a familiar story,

  • The child cannot ask the partner a question about the story.

  • The child asks a question about the story using an incomplete sentence.

  • The child asks a question about the story using a complete sentence.

Storybook Reading Activities: Recognize and use conventional book handling skills

Given a big book correctly placed on an easel,

  • The child cannot point to the front, the back, and/or the last page.

  • The child can point to the front, the back, and the first page.

Given a big book incorrectly placed on an easel,

  • The child cannot place the book in the correct position.

  • The child can place the book in the correct position.

Given a book incorrectly placed on a table,

  • The child cannot place the book in the correct position and/or find the first page.

  • The child can place the book in the correct position and find the first page.

Phonological Awareness Instruction:  Produce rhyming words

Given two words that rhyme,

  • The child cannot produce a third rhyming word.

  • The child can produce a third rhyming word.

Given one word from a large family of rhyming words,

  • The child cannot produce a second rhyming word.

  • The child can produce a second rhyming word.

Given a two-line poem with rhyming words,

  • The child cannot supply a rhyming word to complete the poem.

  • The child can supply a rhyming word to complete the poem.

 

Work With Letters: Sing alphabet

Given the support of a model from the teacher,

  • The child cannot sing the alphabet song.

  • The child can sing parts of the alphabet song.

  • The child can sing the entire alphabet song.

  • The child can sing the entire alphabet song and also engage in a gross motor response.

Looking for a specific topic? Search our Vermilion sites below!

 

 

Key Code for Documents   = Internet Source   = Acrobat Reader   = PowerPoint   =MS Word   = Excel    = Inspiration   = Kidspiration 3  Video

 

1st Grade Main Link    Vermilion Parish for Kids!     Hurricanes for Kids!    LA Indians for Kids!    Louisiana for Kids Site   eHomework Pad for Kids!   Testing Site for Kids!

Vermilion Parish Curriculum Site (Correlates with 2008 Louisiana Comprehensive Curriculum)


Vermilion Parish Schools (Louisiana)

Note: Most sites need Java. Adobe Flash, Shockwave, or Adobe Acrobat Reader
To report broken links or comments, please email
Stacy Bodin.

 

Hit Counter