Your Text Here

Vermilion Parish Schools

Unit  5:   ELA Reading Essentials

Prekindergarten Unit 5

 

Oral Language Development

Goal: Uses words from storybooks in oral language

 

Teachers should provide opportunities for children to use new vocabulary in a variety of settings. Doing so helps the children remember word meanings and makes it more likely that they will use the words on their own.

 

Sample Activities

 

1. The teacher quickly reviews the new words from the read-aloud and then asks questions that require knowledge of each word’s meaning. For example, if the word quick were used in the story, the teacher might ask, “Is a turtle quick?”

 

2. The teacher writes down two or three new words from each read-aloud. These words should be those that the children are unlikely to know, that represent concepts easily tied to what children already know, and that are important to any young child’s vocabulary. As the list of words steadily grows, the teacher refers to it privately each day and tries to use several of the words orally in directions (e.g., “I want you to be as quick as you can”). The teacher notes whether the children’s actions reflect their knowledge of the word. If not, the teacher reminds them of the meaning.

 

3. The teacher periodically chooses several of the words introduced in previous read-alouds, reviews their meanings, and asks the children to say a sentence that correctly uses the word.
 

Storybook Reading Activities

Goal: Understand that print is organized from left to right and top to bottom

 

Directionality of print is vital to successful development as a reader. Not all languages are read from left to right and from the top to the bottom of a page. This means that becoming aware of print direction in English does not come naturally. It must be learned.

 

Sample Activities

 

1. While conducting a read-aloud with a big book, the teacher uses a forefinger to trace the flow of words from left to right. At the end of each line, the teacher models a return sweep and places the forefinger at the beginning of the next line. After reading several pages in this way, the teacher says, “Now, I am going to start reading this page here. Where should I move my finger? Point for me.”

 

2. The teacher turns the page of a big book and says, “Who can come and point to where I should start reading?”

 

3. The teacher might read an entire page in a big book without pointing. The teacher says to the group, “Who can come and point to where I stopped reading?”

Phonological Awareness Instruction

Goal: Isolate initial consonant sounds in words

 

In order to learn letter sounds, a child must be able to distinguish the phonemes that make up a word. Being able to pronounce a phoneme within a spoken word is a major step toward acquiring this ability. Because letter sounds are blended from left to right in the early stages of reading development, it is especially important for children to be able to isolate the first phoneme heard in a word.

 

Sample Activities

 

1. The teacher says a one-syllable word that begins with a continuous consonant sound (e.g., /m/, /n/, /s/, /z/, /j/, etc.). The teacher then asks, “What is the first sound in that word? Listen again – “zzz – oo.” Because the initial consonants are continuous, the teacher can stretch them so that they are easier to hear.

 

2. The teacher pronounces an initial phoneme and asks the children to suggest words that begin with that sound. “Who can tell me a word that starts with /b/?”

 

3. The teacher says a one-syllable word that begins with a stopped consonant (e.g., /b/, /d/, /p/, etc.). The teacher then asks, “What is the first sound in that word? Listen again – p-ig.” Because the initial consonants are stopped, the teacher must segment them to make them audible for the children.

 

Work With Letters

Goal: Recognize last name

 

The children’s last name, printed by the teacher, is an important opportunity to develop alphabet knowledge.  Preschool classrooms provide multiple opportunities to display children’s names.

 

Sample Activities

1. The teacher prepares a chart with each child’s picture and last name.  The children show which last names are theirs by identifying their picture.

 

2. The teacher labels a classroom area (e.g., coat hooks, cubby holes) with each child’s last name.  The teacher shows each child where his or her last name is displayed, and then provides multiple opportunities for the children to identify their own last names.

 

3. The teacher produces a list of the children’s last names.  First, the teacher reads the list of names repeatedly to the children.  Then the teacher asks children to respond when s/he points to their last names.

 

 

 

 

Unit 5 Assessment

Oral Language Development: Uses words from storybooks in oral language

When asked a simple question using a word introduced in a read-aloud,

  • The child cannot answer the question.

  • The child can answer the question.

When given a direction using a word introduced in a read-aloud,

  • The child does not respond in a way that reflects knowledge of the word’s meaning.

  • The child responds in a way that reflects knowledge of the word’s meaning.

When asked to provide a sentence using a word introduced in a read-aloud

  • The child provides a sentence in which the word is incorrectly used.

  • The child provides a sentence in which the word is used awkwardly but not altogether incorrectly.

  • The child provides a sentence in which the word is correctly used.

Storybook Reading Activities: Understands that print is organized from left to right and top to bottom

When asked in which direction a teacher’s finger should move while reading,

  • The child cannot indicate that the finger should move the right.

  • The child indicates that the finger should move the right by pointing or saying so.

When asked where the teacher should begin reading a page,

  • The child cannot point to the first word of the first line.

  • The child can point to the first word of a line other than the first.

  • The child can point to the first line but to a word other than the first.

  • The child can point to the first word of the first line.

After the teacher reads a big-book page without pointing,

  • The child cannot point to the last word of the last line.

  • The child can point to the last word of a line other than the last.

  • The child can point to the last line but to a word other than the last.

  • The child can point to the last word of the last line.

Phonological Awareness Instruction: Isolate initial consonant sounds in words

Given a spoken one-syllable word beginning with an unstopped consonant sound,

  • The child cannot say that phoneme in isolation.

  • The child can say that phoneme in isolation.

Given a consonant phoneme,

  • The child cannot provide a word beginning with that phoneme.

  • The child can provide a word beginning with that phoneme.

Given a spoken one-syllable word beginning with a stopped consonant sound,

  • The child cannot say that phoneme in isolation.

  • The child can say that phoneme in isolation.

Work With Letters: Recognize last name

Given a list of names and pictures,

  • The child cannot recognize his/her last name.

  • The child can recognize his/her last name.

In the classroom environment,

  • The child cannot recognize his/her last name.

  • The child can recognize his/her last name.

Given a list of names of children in the class,

  • The child cannot recognize his/her last name.

  • The child can recognize his/her last name.

 
 

Looking for a specific topic? Search our Vermilion sites below!

 

 

Key Code for Documents   = Internet Source   = Acrobat Reader   = PowerPoint   =MS Word   = Excel    = Inspiration   = Kidspiration 3  Video

 

1st Grade Main Link    Vermilion Parish for Kids!     Hurricanes for Kids!    LA Indians for Kids!    Louisiana for Kids Site   eHomework Pad for Kids!   Testing Site for Kids!

Vermilion Parish Curriculum Site (Correlates with 2008 Louisiana Comprehensive Curriculum)


Vermilion Parish Schools (Louisiana)

Note: Most sites need Java. Adobe Flash, Shockwave, or Adobe Acrobat Reader
To report broken links or comments, please email
Stacy Bodin.

 

Hit Counter