Unit 4-1:  Animal Habitats

Study Focus: Pets (week 1 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to introduce students to pets and pet care.

Student Understandings: Students will develop an understanding of the role of pets and the kinds of animals people usually have as pets. Students will understand that veterinarians provide medical care for animals. Students will understand that pets have special needs and must be cared for by humans.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students name a variety of animals often kept as pets?
  2. Can students identify a veterinarian as an animal doctor?
  3. Can students identify the basic needs of all pets?
  4. Can students understand which animals are better suited as pets?

Guiding Vocabulary: pet, tame, animal shelter, veterinarian, vaccination, cage, collar, leash, crate, perch, mammal, domestic, fur, feathers, whiskers, groom, pets, dog, puppy, cat, kitten, bird

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)


 

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA - 13

Identify problems and solutions in stories that are read aloud (PK‑LL‑R2) (ELA‑7‑E2)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)


 

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)


 

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-3

Identify community workers and their jobs  (PK-CSS-C1) (C-1D-E3) (C-1D-E4)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Pets

Veterinarians

Dogs

Cats

Birds

Whole Group Activities

Graphic Organizer

(brainstorming)

ELA 4,16,18, 21, 24, 26, 27, 29;

M 13;  SCI 24

Show and Tell

KWL Chart

ELA 4, 21, 22, 26, 29; SS 3

Discussion and Story

ELA 4,16,18,21,22,

26, 27, 29; M 13;

SCI 24

Graphic Organizer

ELA 4,16,18,21,22,

26, 27, 29; M 13;

SCI 24

Graphic Organizer

ELA 4,16,18,21,22,

26, 27, 29; M 13;

SCI 24

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Do you have a pet?

Would you like to be a veterinarian?

Do you like dogs?

Do you like cats?

Do you like birds?

Storytime

Suggested

alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

These Are My Pets by Mercer Mayer

 

I Was Walking Down the Road by Sarah Barchas

Let’s Get a Pup said Kate by Bob Graham

Ginger by Charlotte Voake

Oh The Pets You Can Get! by Tish Rabe

Small Group Activities

Class Book Learning Log:What pet would you get?

ELA 4,16,19,21,22,26

Pet Counting Stories

ELA 23,24; M 1,2,4

Puppy Paw Biscuits

ELA 23,24

Pet Patterns

ELA 23,24; M 13

What’s Missing Game

ELA 21,23,24

Music and Movement

Animal movements to music: fly, crawl, swim, creep, slither, etc.

 

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

After checking for allergies and any school/district policies regarding animal visitors in the school, invite students to bring pets to visit; bring in/borrow pets to come visit; Humane Society representative; veterinarian or vet  assistant; visit a local pet store

 


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can You Find the Letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough Letters

Letter  jars

Dot Letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel Board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

BLM: Dog House Counting.  Draw doghouse shapes on clear cups with permanent marker.  Use large tongue depressors and draw dogs on them. Use number cube (dice) to determine how many dogs go in each house.

Measurement

Use several dog or cat leashes and have students compare them. Talk about what size animal they think would need each leash. Have students compare and order the leashes from longest to shortest.

Geometry

BLM: Triangle Cat Geometry

Give each student a 5 x7 brown mailer envelope and different sized triangles cut out of paper. Encourage students to make a triangle cat.  Students can put their hands inside the envelope to make a puppet. Have students help triangle cat find other triangles in the classroom.

Data Collection

BLM: What kind of pet would you buy at a pet store?

Patterning

Make a pattern with real dog biscuits then have students copy and extend the pattern.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,  6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 5,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

compare pet types: bird, reptile, mammal, amphibian

weigh pet kibble with  pan or balance scales

 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

Dog Bone Hot Potato Game

Duck, Duck, Goose variations such as Puppy, Puppy, Dog

 


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10,

11

SCI 3,  9, 16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

pet animal figures, pictures of pets, magazines such as Dog Fancy, etc.

 

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4,5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

animal counters and mats for sorting/counting

small dog biscuits and tongs for sorting/counting into pet food dishes

match and order dog biscuits from smallest to largest

pet food cans in various sizes and shapes to match and order from smallest to largest

pet leashes and/or collars to compare sizes and lengths

 

Computer

ELA 30

a variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/pets/games/index.html

http://www.akc.org/pdfs/public_education/agility_obstacles.pdf

http://www.petoftheday.com/

http://www.sesameworkshop.org/sesamestreet/games/flash.php?contentId=11230208

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

Pet-shaped sponge prints; feather painting; paw print stamps

 

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

bird seed with scoops and bowls

 

Water:

plastic fish, turtles, and frogs can be added

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Tiny Tim the Turtle, Baby Fish, BINGO, Three Little Kittens, I Had a Bird – Dr. Jean

 


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

Pet Store or Vets Office

add pet care props and stuffed animals to house center

pet care magazines and sales ads from pet shops

pictures of pets; signs from pet shops

 

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

class-made book: What Pet Would You Get?

pet care magazines and sales ads from pet shops

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; stencils; variety of writing tools, such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers

sales ads from pet stores

pet word cards,

 

Whole Group Activities

Whole Group Activity 1: Pets Circle Map (GLEs: ELA 3a, 3b, 4, 16, 18, 21, 24, 26, 27, 29; M 13; SCI 24)

 

Materials List: large circle graphic organizer drawn on chart paper, chart markers, toy microphone or other object for students to pass around the circle; poem: What the Animals Say

                                                                        Open group with the following poem:

 

What the Animals Say

                                                                                    Little pup, little pup

                                                                                    What do you say?

                                                                                    “Woof, woof, woof!

                                                                                    Let’s go and play.”


 

                                                                                    Kittycat, kittycat,

                                                                                    How about you?

                                                                                    “Meow, meow, meow!

                                                                                    And I purr, too.”

 

                                                                                    Pretty bird, pretty bird

                                                                                    Have you a song?

                                                                                    “Tweet, tweet, tweet!

                                                                                    The whole day long.”

 

Write the word Pets in the center circle of the graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions). Relate a personal story about pets. Ask students to show a thumbs up if they have a pet or a thumbs down if they do not have a pet. Ask students to tell you what they know about pets. Write student responses inside the large outer circle of the circle map.

 

Close by having the students sit in a circle. Ask students to take turns passing a toy microphone, wand, baton, or other object to designate the current speaker. As each child gets the microphone or other object, he/she should tell the class what kind of pet he/she has. If a child has no pet, then ask that child what kind of pet he/she would like to have.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Veterinarian (GLEs: ELA 4, 21, 22, 26, 29; SS 3)

 

Materials List: photo pictures of a veterinarian; a doctor’s kit with items such as a stethoscope, needle free syringe, gauze bandaging, plastic thermometer, otoscope (tool doctors use to see inside ears & noses); lab coat or white men’s shirt, chart paper, markers

 

Wear the lab coat or a large white men’s shirt to group time and bring the doctor’s kit. Ask the students who they think you are pretending to be. Give hints and guide students to realize that you are pretending to be a doctor for animals. Ask if any of them know the special name given to doctors for animals. Create a KWL graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions) by writing the word “veterinarian” on the board or chart tablet. Encourage students to say the word. Ask students to recall a time when they may have gone with a pet to visit a veterinarian and allow time for students to share brief stories. As students share what they know about veterinarians, write their knowledge on the KWL chart.

 

Show students the doctor’s kit. Ask if anyone knows what it is and what might be inside. Give students time to share their ideas. One by one, pull out each object in the bag and lead a short discussion about what the item is called and what it is used for with a pet. Be sure to discuss the importance of keeping a pet immunized so it will be healthy. As the materials are discussed and information about veterinarians is shared, write down student


 

questions/wonders on the KWL chart. Tell students that you are writing down their questions or “I wonders…” so that their questions can be answered later and when they learn something new about veterinarians, they should share that new knowledge so that it can be added to the KWL Chart.

 

Explain to students that these props will be included in the veterinarian’s office center during center time. Review with students the procedures for how the materials are to be used in this center and procedures for ensuring that each student will have a turn to use the center.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

Whole Group Activity 3: Dogs (GLEs: ELA 4, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; M 13; SCI 24)

 

Materials List: McDuff Moves In (book), pictures of several kinds of dogs; dog care products such as leash, collar, brush, chew toy, dog food, treats, bed (substitute pictures of dog care products where actual objects are not available); I Had a Dog (poem)

 

Open group with I Had a Dog:                      I had a dog and his name was Dandy.

                                                                        His tail was long and his legs were bandy.

                                                                        His eyes were brown and his coat was sandy.

                                                                        The best in the world was my dog Dandy.

 

Display the pictures and dog care items. Ask students what they think they are going to be talking about today. Lead a class discussion around the items: what they are called, their uses, etc. Look at the pictures and ask students to notice the many kinds of dogs. Point out differences such as size, color, and fur type. Ask students what is the same about all the dogs (e.g., 4 legs, furry, nose, ears, teeth).

 

Display the front cover of the book, McDuff Moves In, and ask students what they think the story is about. Read the title, author’s name and illustrator’s name aloud. Read the story, pausing where appropriate for questions and comments about the story and/or illustrations. At the end of the story, ask students if the story was what they expected it to be about. Where do they think McDuff came from? How did McDuff get his name? Was the story sad or happy? Why?

 

End the lesson by explaining that the dog care products and pictures will be on display during center time.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 


Whole Group Activity 4: Cats Bubble Map (GLEs: ELA 4, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; M 13; SCI 24)

 

Materials List: bubble map graphic organizer; chart markers; pictures of several kinds of cats; cat care products such as collar, brush, toy, cat food, treats, bed (substitute pictures of cat care products where actual objects are not available); Three Little Kittens (poem)

 

Open with Three Little Kittens:                       Three little kittens lost their mittens;

                                                                        And they began to cry,

                                                                        “Oh, mother dear, we very much fear

                                                                        Our mittens we have lost.”

 

                                                                        “What! Lost your mittens, you naughty kittens!”

                                                                        Then you shall have no pie.”

                                                                        “Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow.”

                                                                        “No, you shall have no pie.”

                                  

                                                                        The three little kittens they found their mittens;

                                                                        And they began to cry,

                                                                        “Oh, mother dear, see here, see here!

                                                                        Our mittens we have found.”

 

                                                                        “What! Found your mittens! You good little kittens,

                                                                        Now you shall have some pie.”

                                                                        “Purr, purr, purr, purr,

                                                                        Yes, you shall have some pie.”

 

Display the pictures and cat care items. Ask students what they think they are going to be talking about today. Lead a class discussion around the items: what they are called, their uses, etc. Look at the pictures and ask students to notice the many kinds of cats. Point out differences such as size, color, and fur type. Ask students what is the same about all the cats (e.g. 4 legs, furry, nose, ears, teeth).

 

Write the word Cat in the center circle of the graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions). Ask students to tell about what cats look like, act like, and feel like to complete the bubble map. Encourage students to use describing words such as soft, purrs, sharp claws, etc. to describe cats. Write students’ descriptive words in the bubbles surrounding the center bubble of the bubble map.  To close, review the completed graphic organizer with students. Post the graphic organizer and invite students to return to it later to add newly learned information (use a different color marker for new information).

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

Whole Group Activity 5: Bird Circle Map (GLEs: ELA 3a, 3b, 4, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; M 13; SCI 24)

 

Materials List: circle map graphic organizer; chart markers; pictures of several kinds of birds commonly kept as pets; bird care products such as cage, toy, food, treats (substitute pictures of bird care products where actual objects are not available); Two Little Blackbirds (song from CD Fingerplays and Footplays by Kimbo)

 

Open with the song/finger play Two Little Blackbirds          

Two little black birds (hold up index finger of each hand)

Sitting on a hill

One named Jack. (hold right hand/finger forward)

And the other named Jill. (hold left hand/finger forward)

Fly away, Jack. (wiggle right finger and place behind your back)

Fly away Jill. (wiggle left finger and place behind your back)

Come back, Jack. (bring right hand back)

Come back, Jill. (bring left hand back)

Two little blackbirds sitting on a hill.

 

Display the pictures and bird care items. Ask students what they think they are going to be talking about today. Lead a class discussion around the items: what they are called, their uses, etc. Look at the pictures and ask students to notice the many kinds of birds. Point out differences such as size, color, and feathers. Ask students what is the same about all the birds (e.g. 2 legs, feathers, beak, wings).

 

Write the word Bird in the center circle of the graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions). Ask students to tell everything they know about pet birds and write their words in the outer circle of the circle map. To close, review the completed graphic organizer with students. Post the graphic organizer and invite students to return to it later to add newly learned information (use a different color marker for new information).

                                                                                                                                                                                          

Accommodations: None needed

 

 


Small Group Activities

 

Small Group Activity 1: Class Book Learning Log: What pet would you get? (GLEs: ELA 4, 16, 19, 21, 22, 26)

 

Materials List: writing/drawing tools such as colored pencils, markers, or crayons; What pet would you get? BLM: Book Cover BLM

 

Put out an assortment of crayons, markers, and/or colored pencils for students to use. Duplicate the What pet would you get? BLM for each student in the class. Using this BLM as a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions), have students come to you individually and answer the question, “What pet would you get?” Write each student’s name and response in the appropriate spaces on the learning log. Have each student draw a picture of the pet he/she chose in the space provided. Keep everyone’s paper and bind them together in a class book to place in the library center.

 

Accommodations: Assist students with fine motor difficulties by providing easier-to-use writing/drawing utensils such as markers. Guide students to identify a pet through questions and comments about what kinds of animals they would like.

 

Small Group Activity 2: Pet counting stories (GLEs: ELA 23, 24; M 1, 2, 4)

 

Materials List: Pet Counting Mats BLM, dog and cat counters, number cards 1 – 10

 

Give each student a counting mat and up to 10 dog and cat counters. Hold up a number card and direct students to count out that number of pets onto the counting mat. For example, say:      “This is the number 3. Put 3 pets in your yard.” Check each student’s counting mat for the correct number of pet counters. Have students clear their mats and continue this activity with numbers 1 – 10.

 

Accommodate varying skill levels by adjusting the difficulty level. For example:

a  Focus on numbers 1 – 5 for students who need more practice counting 1 – 5 objects.

a  Add number cards 11 – 20 for more advanced students.

a  Hold up the cards without saying the number for number recognition practice.

a  For students who are ready, incorporate simple “putting together” and “taking away” stories. For example:

o   Billy had 5 pets in his yard. One pet went into the house. How many pets are still in the yard?

o   Sally had 3 pets in her yard. Two more pets came to play. How many pets are in her yard now?

 

Accommodations: Note accommodations listed above

 

 

Small Group Activity 3: Puppy Paw Biscuits (GLEs: ELA 23, 24)

 

Materials List: refrigerator biscuit dough, baking sheets, non-stick aluminum foil,  access to an oven that has been pre-heated according the biscuit packaging

 

Have students wash hands before coming to the center. Give each student a piece of foil with an uncooked biscuit on top. Demonstrate to students how to make a fist with the middle knuckle a bit higher than the other knuckles. Then show them how to press their knuckles into the biscuit dough to make a puppy print. Move the foil with the puppy print dough onto a baking sheet. Repeat this procedure with each student, then bake the biscuits as directed on the packaging. Serve the biscuits for snacks.

 

Accommodations: Check for allergies

 

Small Group Activity 4: Pet Patterns (GLEs: ELA 23, 24; M 13)

 

Materials List: Pet Pattern Strips BLM, dog and cat counters

 

Invite students to match, copy, extend and create patterns with the Pet Pattern Strips BLM and pet counters.

 

Accommodations: Have students match and copy the patterns on the strips before introducing the idea of extending or creating patterns

 

Small Group Activity 5: What’s Missing?(GLEs: ELA 12, 21, 23, 24)

 

Materials List: large tray or cookie sheet; an assortment of pet-related objects such as collar, toy, treat, leash, small food dish, small toy pet animals, etc.; cloth

 

Begin by placing five or fewer pet-related objects on the tray and cover it with a cloth. Tell students they are going to play a memory game called What’s Missing? Remove the cloth from the tray and let them see what’s underneath. Then cover the tray, remove something, and let students figure out what’s missing. Play the game as directed. If it seems too easy, add more items to the tray. If it seems too difficult, decrease the number of items on the tray.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

§  Small Group Activity 2: Pet Counting – observe and document student skills in counting objects 1 – 10.

§  Small Group Activity 4: Patterning – observe and document students’ ability to copy and extend AB patterns.

 

 


Resources

Children’s Books

Arnosky, Jim. All About Frogs. ISBN 978-0590481649

Barchas, Sarah E. I Was Walking Down the Road. ISBN 0-590-10137-4

Bourgeois, Paulette. Franklin Wants A Pet. ISBN 0-590-48915-1

Chessen, Betsey. Pet Care. ISBN 0-439-04589-4

DK Books. See How They Grow: Mouse. ISBN 0-525-67357-1

DK Books. See How They Grow: Rabbit. ISBN 0-525-67356-3

Eastman, P.D. Go, Dog. Go! ISBN 0-375-87521-2

Ehlert, Lois. Top Cat. ISBN 0-15-202425-5

Gag, Wanda. Millions of Cats. ISBN 0-590-40612-4

Graham, Bob. Let’s Get a Pup said Kate. ISBN 076362536-1

Keats, Ezra Jack. Pet Show! ISBN 0-689-71159-X

Keats, Ezra Jack. Whistle for Willie. ISBN 0-439-11423-3

Keller, Holly. A Bed Full of Cats. ISBN 0-15-202262-7

King-Smith, Dick. I Love Guinea Pigs!. ISBN 0-76-36-1435-1

Mayer, Mercer. These Are My Pets. ISBN 0-307-11664-6

Mazer, Anne. The Salamander Room. ISBN 0-679-87134-9

Moore, Inga. Six-Dinner Sid. ISBN 0-671-79613-5

O’Donnell, Elizabeth Lee. I Can’t Get My Turtle to Move. ISBN 978-0688073237

Palmer, Helen. A Fish Out of Water. ISBN 978-0394800233

Rabe, Tish. Oh The Pets You Can Get!. ISBN 0-375-82278-X

Schenk de Regniers, Beatrice. So Many Cats! ISBN 0-89919-700-0

Scruton, Clive. Where Are Mary’s Pets? ISBN 0-7636-0760-6

Voake, Charlotte. Ginger. ISBN 0-7636-0788-6

Wells, Rosemary. McDuff Moves In. ISBN 0-590-03225-9

Wells, Rosemary. McDuff Comes Home. ISBN 0-590-64755-5

Wells, Rosemary. McDuff and the Baby. ISBN 0-7868-2258-9

 

Recordings/CDs

Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs

Dr. Jean’s Nursery Rhymes and Good Ol’ Times

Dr. Jean and Friends

 


Unit 4-1 :  Animal Habitats

Study Focus: Pets (week 2 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to continue introduction of the variety of pets available and the needs of those pets.

Student Understandings: Students will have an expanded understanding of the kinds of animals often kept as pets. Students will understand that all pets need special care to keep them healthy and happy.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students identify a variety of animals often kept as pets?
  2. Can students name some of the special needs of specific pets?
  3. Can students identify the characteristics of animals kept as pets?
  4. Can students understand that pets require people to care for them?

Guiding Vocabulary: pets, fish, lizard, snake, hamster, guinea pig, gerbil, turtle, frog, tank, heat lamp, bedding, reptile, mammal, cage

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)


 

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)


 

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)


 

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Fish

Lizards and Snakes

Small mammals

Turtles & Frogs

Pet Show

Whole Group Activities

SQPL

ELA 21,22,26,27,29; SCI 23,24

Compare and Discuss

ELA 21,22,26; SCI 24

Hamsters

Guinea pigs

Rabbits

Word Grid

ELA 16,18,21,22,26

,27,29; SCI 3,24

Show and Tell

Pet Frog by Robin Nelson

ELA 4,6,8,9,10,21,22,

26,27; M 1, 13;

SCI 3,22,24

Students bring real or pretend pets

ELA 21,22,26,29;

SCI 1

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27;

SS 4, 5, 7

Would you like a pet fish?

Would you hold a snake?

Would you hold a hamster?

Would you hold a frog?

Would you hold a turtle?

Storytime

Suggested

alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

A Fish Out of Water by Helen Palmer

 

 

The Salamander Room

I Like Guinea Pigs!

I Can’t Get My Turtle to Move!

Pet Show

Small Group Activities

Fish Counting Stories

ELA 23,24; M 1,2,4

Measuring length

ELA 23,24; M 1,2,6; SCI 4

Carrot Snacks

ELA 21,22,23,24,26; M 6; SCI 21,24

Pets: Professor Know It All

ELA 21,22,26,27,29; SCI 2,24

Sort pets

ELA 24; M 1,2,5,9

Music and Movement

Animal movements to music: crawl, swim, hop, etc.

 

 

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Invite students to bring pets to visit

Bring in/Borrow pets to come visit

Humane Society Representative

Veterinarian or Vet. Assistant

Visit a local pet store

 


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can You Find the Letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough Letters

Letter  jars

Dot Letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel Board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Use dog biscuits to count into the cups from BLM Dog House Counting (week 1).

 

Measurement

Using several dog or cat leashes and collars, have students compare them and talk about what size animal they think each collar or leash fits.

Geometry

Use plastic pet animals and hide them in various places in the classroom. Have students go on a pet hunt and report where they found them using positional words such as under the block shelf, inside the basket, etc.

Data Collection

BLM Graph: What animal do you have or would you like to have for a pet?

Patterning

Have students use plastic pet animals to copy, extend, or create a pattern.  If plastic pets are not available use Turtle/Frog BLM.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

a class pet or borrowed pet such as a hamster, gerbil, guinea pig, fish, etc.

snake skin

pet foods such as kibble, rabbit food, bird seed, etc., to examine and compare

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

animal movements

 


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 3, 9, 16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

small mammal mazes: Model for students how to use unit blocks to create pathways, mazes, and enclosures for a small mammal pet such as a guinea pig and encourage students to create their own,

 

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8,  9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

fish counters/aquarium counting mats: Students use a die or spinner to determine the number of fish to count onto a single mat.  A set of mats can be programmed with numerals 1 – 10 with students counting out the matching number of fish onto the appropriate mat

lizard and snake counters: use in the same ways as fish counters.

frog and turtle counters: use in the same way as fish counters.

measuring snakes: use rulers to measure the lengths of plastic snakes; compare a variety of snake lengths to one another

Computer

ELA 30

a variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/pets/games/index.html

http://www.akc.org/pdfs/public_education/agility_obstacles.pdf

http://www.petoftheday.com/

http://www.sesameworkshop.org/sesamestreet/games/flash.php?contentId=11230208

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

“snake” painting with plastic snakes

fish prints

 

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

lizards and snakes in sand

add bowls or buckets for “catching” them

Water:

fish, frogs, and turtles

add small hand nets for “catching” them

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Tiny Tim the Turtle, Baby Fish, BINGO, Three Little Kittens, I Had a Bird – Dr. Jean

 


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

pet props in House Center

Pet Store or Veterinarian Office

pet magazines such as Dog Fancy, Cat World, etc.

 

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

class-made book: What Pet Would You Get?

pet magazines such as Dog Fancy, Cat World, etc.

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; stencils; variety of writing tools, such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers

sales ads from pet stores

pet word cards

 

Whole Group Activities

Whole Group Activity 1: Fish Show & Tell (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; SCI 23, 24)

 

Materials List: real pet fish, if possible, or pictures of fish in aquariums; chart paper, markers, I Know How to Care for Fish (song)

 

Open with the song:    I Know How to Care for Fish

                                    (tune: Mary Had a Little Lamb)

                                               

                                                            I know how to care for fish,

                                                            Care for fish, care for fish.

 

                                                            I know how to care for fish.

                                                            I feed them once a day!

 

                                                           


 

                                                            I know how to care for fish,

                                                            Care for fish, care for fish.

 

                                                            I know how to care for fish.

                                                            I keep their water clean!

 

Display the fish (or pictures). Using a modified SQPL strategy (view literacy strategy descriptions), write: “Fish make good pets.” on the chart paper, reading the statement aloud as it is written. Ask students what they can tell you about keeping fish as pets. Write down student statements and questions on the chart paper, using one color for statements of knowledge and another color for questions. Guide discussion with questions such as:

§  What kind of homes do fish need?

§  What do we feed pet fish?

§  What special things to fish owners have to do for their pets?

§  Why do people like to keep fish for pets?

 

Tell students that they can return to the chart paper to add more information about fish as pets as they learn more. Close with the song.                                                                                                                                                         

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Lizards and Snakes (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 26; SCI 24)

 

Materials List: a live pet lizard or snake, if possible, or pictures of pet lizards and snakes in the habitats pet owners provided (alternate material: book The Salamander Room)

 

If possible, bring in a real reptile pet for students to observe. Exotics are probably not a familiar pet to most students so most of the information regarding this type of pet will be from the teacher or pet owner. Petco and other pet stores may be a good source of information and/or field experiences that would allow students some first-hand experiences with exotic pets such as lizards and snakes. Lead students in a discussion of what kinds of foods the animal(s) might eat, what kind of home they need, what they feel like and look like, how they move, etc.

 

If a live pet snake or lizard is not available, read the story The Salamander Room and discuss the changes that happened in the story.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 


Whole Group Activity 3:  Small Mammals: Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Rabbits, Gerbils, Rats, Ferrets, etc. (GLEs: ELA 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; SCI 3, 24)

 

Materials List: one or more small mammal pet and/or pictures of these types of pets; word grid; marker; Do You Have a Guinea Pig?(song)

 

Prior to the lesson, create a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) similar to the example:

 

 

Gerbil

Hamster

Guinea Pig

Mouse

Rabbit

    Cage                   

 

 

 

 

 

Wheel 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetables  

 

 

 

 

 

Hay            

 

 

 

 

 

Seeds    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Open with the song Do You Have a Guinea Pig?

                               (Tune: Do You Know the Muffin Man?)

                                   

                                                            Oh, do you have a guinea pig? Guinea pig? Guinea pig?

                                                            Oh, do you have a guinea pig? That lives inside a cage?

 

                                                            Oh, do you have a hamster? A hamster? A hamster?

                                                            Oh, do you have a hamster? That runs inside a wheel?

 

Display the small mammal pet you brought to class and pictures of other small mammal pets. Lead a discussion with the children about how all these pets are similar with similar needs. Complete the word grid of small mammals and their needs. Discuss features such as the pet’s need for an appropriate home and how a pet owner would make a home for the pet. Discuss the pet’s need for the right kind of food and what might happen if the pet wasn’t well fed. Ask students how a new pet owner might find out how to take good care of their pet.

 

Close with the song, perhaps adding one or more verses about some of the other small mammal pets. (e.g. rabbit: that loves to eat carrots or gerbil: that chews lots and lots)

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

Whole Group Activity 4: Turtles and Frogs (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 21, 22, 26, 27; M 1, 13; SCI 3, 22, 24)

 

Materials List: a live turtle and a live frog; There Once Was a Turtle (fingerplay), Five Green and Speckled Frogs (song): Pet Frog (book) by Robin Nelson

 

Open with the finger play:      There Once Was a Turtle

 

                                                There was a little turtle. (make a fist)

                                                He lived in a box. (draw a square in the air)

                                                He swam in a puddle. (pretend to swim)

                                                He climbed on the rocks. (pretend to climb)

                                                He snapped at a mosquito. (snap)

                                                He snapped at a flea. (snap)

                                                He snapped at a minnow. (snap)

                                   


 

                                    And he snapped at me. (snap)

                                    He caught the mosquito. (clap)

                                    He caught the flea. (clap)

                                    He caught the minnow. (clap)

But he didn’t catch me. (wave index finger to say no-no)

 

Display the live turtle and frog. Give students an opportunity to see them, then lead a discussion:

§  Do you think these animals would make good pets? Why? Why not?

§  What do each of them need to be healthy and happy?

§  What would the pet owner need to know to keep a turtle or a frog as a pet?

§   

Read the book, Pet Frog, to the class. Did the book answer any of their questions? Did they learn more about keeping a frog as a pet?

 

Close with song: Five Green and Speckled Frogs

 

                        Five green and speckled frogs,

                        Sat on a speckled log,

                        Eating some most delicious bugs!

                        Yum! Yum!

                        One jumped into the pool

                        Where it was nice and cool.

                        Then there were four green speckled frogs!

                        Croak! Croak!

 

Repeat the countdown to “no green speckled frogs” as the last phrase of the last verse.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 


Whole Group Activity 5: Pet Show (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 26, 29; SCI 1)

 

Materials List:  stuffed animal pets brought to school by students (request in advance of lesson)

 

Have extra stuffed animal pets on hand for those who forget to bring one. Have each student sit in the circle with his/her pet in his/her lap. Have them take turns telling the class about his/her pet. Encourage students to listen respectfully and take turns talking about their pets. Prompt students to raise their hands and ask questions to get more information about the pet. Questions may include:

o   What is your pet?

o   Does your pet have a name?

o   Where does your pet sleep?

o   If your pet was real, what would he eat?

 

Accommodations:  This activity may need to be divided into several smaller segments of time to allow all students to participate yet keep the length of the group time session to an appropriate amount of time (i.e., two or three 15 minute segments of time rather than one 30 – 45 minute group time).

 

Small Group Activities

Small Group Activity 1: Fish Counting Stories (GLEs: ELA 23, 24; M 1, 2, 4)

 

Materials List: plastic fish counters, Aquarium BLM, number cards 1 - 10

 

Invite students to come count fish counters on the aquarium counting mats. Hold up the number card as you tell students how many fish to put on the mat. To make it more challenging, hold up the card without saying the number orally. Observe and document students’ counting abilities during this activity.       

 

Accommodations: Adapt to individual student needs by adjusting the numerals and skill level

 

 


Small Group Activity 2: Measuring Length (GLEs: ELA 23, 24; M 1, 2, 6; SCI 4)

 

Materials List: plastic lizards and snakes of varying lengths, Snake and Lizard Measuring BLM, linking cubes or 1 inch cubes

 

Invite students to use the linking or 1 inch cubes to measure the plastic snakes and lizards. Guide student work with questions such as:

§  How many cubes long is that snake?

§  Which is longer, the snake or the lizard?

§  Which is shorter?

 

After students have had some practice with measuring the toy lizards and snakes, ask them to measure the ones on the blackline master. Continue to ask guiding questions and encourage students to measure objects with the cubes. Observe and document students’ ability to understand measurement.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

Small Group Activity 3: Carrot Snacks (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 26; M 6; SCI 21, 24)

 

Materials List: vegetable peelers, serrated safety knives, teacher knife, cutting board, whole carrots, ranch dressing or other veggie dip, small disposable plates

 

Before allowing students to handle food items, check for allergies. Have students wash hands before coming to the area. Demonstrate how to use the vegetable peelers and safety knives. Safety knives are the same kinds of knives that are often sold with pumpkin carving kits. They have dull, serrated edges that will not cut skin. Have students peel, rinse and cut the carrots into sections. The teacher may need to quarter or halve larger carrots for the students. Allow students to snack on the carrot sticks. Serve with ranch dressing or veggie dip of your choice, if desired.

 

As students are working on the carrots, mention that carrots are vegetables often eaten by small mammals such as rabbits, guinea pigs, and hamsters. Encourage informal conversation among the students as they work on the carrots.

 

Accommodations: Check for food allergies and adjust where necessary

 


Small Group Activity 4: Pets Professor Know-It-All (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; SCI 2, 24)

 

Materials List: pet pictures, Professor Know-It-All hat

 

Show the students each pet picture. Lead each small group to come up with 2 or 3 questions to ask professor know-it-all  (view literacy strategy descriptions) about each pet. Put the pet cards face down. One student puts on the professor’s hat and draws a pet card.  The professor holds up the pet card so that the other students can see it. The other students ask the professor the agreed-upon questions; then the professor answers the questions about that pet. Play continues in this way until all the students have had a turn to ask questions and to be the professor. Observe and document students’ questioning skills and students’ ability to orally answer questions.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

Small Group Activity 5: Sort Pets (GLEs: ELA 24; M 1, 2, 5, 9)

 

Materials List: stuffed animal pets students brought from home

 

Invite students to sort the stuffed animal pets according to the following characteristics:

§  Large and small

§  Dogs, cats, and other animals

§  Colors: black, brown, white, etc.

Encourage students to come up with their own sorting characteristics and sort the animals accordingly. After each sorting, have students count how many animals are in each set of animals. Discuss which set has more, less, fewer, the same, etc.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 


Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Small Group Activity 2: Measuring length – observe and document student skills in using nonstandard units of measurement and understanding of longer and shorter.

 

·         Small Group Activity 4: Professor Know-It-All - observe and document student skills in formulating and asking questions.

 


Resources

Children’s Books

Arnosky, Jim. All About Frogs. ISBN 978-0590481649

Barchas, Sarah E. I Was Walking Down the Road. ISBN 0-590-10137-4

Bourgeois, Paulette. Franklin Wants A Pet. ISBN 0-590-48915-1

Chessen, Betsey. Pet Care. ISBN 0-439-04589-4

DK Books. See How They Grow: Mouse. ISBN 0-525-67357-1

DK Books. See How They Grow: Rabbit. ISBN 0-525-67356-3

Eastman, P.D. Go, Dog. Go! ISBN 0-375-87521-2

Ehlert, Lois. Top Cat. ISBN 0-15-202425-5

Gag, Wanda. Millions of Cats. ISBN 0-590-40612-4

Graham, Bob. Let’s Get a Pup said Kate. ISBN 076362536-1

Keats, Ezra Jack. Pet Show! ISBN 0-689-71159-X

Keats, Ezra Jack. Whistle for Willie. ISBN 0-439-11423-3

Keller, Holly. A Bed Full of Cats. ISBN 0-15-202262-7

King-Smith, Dick. I Love Guinea Pigs!. ISBN 0-76-36-1435-1

Mayer, Mercer. These Are My Pets. ISBN 0-307-11664-6

Mazer, Anne. The Salamander Room. ISBN 0-679-87134-9

Moore, Inga. Six-Dinner Sid. ISBN 0-671-79613-5

O’Donnell, Elizabeth Lee. I Can’t Get My Turtle to Move. ISBN 978-0688073237

Palmer, Helen. A Fish Out of Water. ISBN 978-0394800233

Rabe, Tish. Oh The Pets You Can Get!. ISBN 0-375-82278-X

Schenk de Regniers, Beatrice. So Many Cats! ISBN 0-89919-700-0

Scruton, Clive. Where Are Mary’s Pets? ISBN 0-7636-0760-6

Voake, Charlotte. Ginger. ISBN 0-7636-0788-6

Wells, Rosemary. McDuff Moves In. ISBN 0-590-03225-9

Wells, Rosemary. McDuff Comes Home. ISBN 0-590-64755-5

Wells, Rosemary. McDuff and the Baby. ISBN 0-7868-2258-9

 

Recordings/CDs

Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs

Dr. Jean’s Nursery Rhymes and Good Ol’ Times

Dr. Jean and Friends


Unit 4-2:  Animal Habitats

Study Focus: Farm (week 1 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to introduce students to farm animals, farmers, and farm life.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that some animals live on farms. Students will recognize that farm workers take care of the animals on the farm. Students will understand that farm animals produce products used by people.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students identify a farm environment?
  2. Can students identify what happens on a farm?
  3. Can students identify different varieties of farm animals?
  4. Can students identify the characteristics of farm animals?
  5. Can students identify some of the products produced on farms?

Guiding Vocabulary: farm, farmer, barn, crop, field, fence, gate, tractor, harvest, silo, bale, plow, produce, veterinarian, farm animals (e.g., horse, cow, chicken, rooster, duck, pig, sheep, etc.)

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)


 

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-13

Identify problems and solutions in stories that are read aloud (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-7-E2)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)


 

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)


 

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Introduction to Farm

Farm Implements

The Farmer

What Farmers Grow

Farm Products

Whole Group Activities

Farm

Brainstorm

ELA 3 ,4, 10, 16, 22, 24, 28

Farm Riddle Game

ELA 22, 23, 24, 27; SCI  2

Farmer in the Dell

ELA 16; M 1, 3; SS 4

Farmer Grows the Corn

ELA 24, 26, 27, 29; M 13; SCI 1, 3, 23

Egg Relay Game

ELA 3, 23, 24, 29; M  2

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you ever been on a farm?

 

Have you ever ridden on a tractor?

Do you know a farmer?

Do you like corn?

Have you ever eaten scrambled eggs?

Storytime

Suggested

alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Farming by Gail Gibbons

 

 

Big Red Barn by Margaret Wise Brown

On A Farm by Susan Canizares & Betsy Waugh

Cock-a-Doodle –Doo by Venice Shone

Milk Makers by Gail Gibbons

Small Group Activities

Types of Farms

ELA 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 14c, 16, 22; SCI 2, 9, 20, 22

 

Tractor Trouble

DR-TA

ELA  4, 6, 9, 11, 12b, 12c, 18, 26; SCI 16

Dramatize Farmer and the Beet

Story Chain

ELA 6, 7, 8, 9, 12a, 13, 23, 24; M 3

Seed Planting

ELA  23, 24;  SCI 1, 3, 8, 20, 23

A Dairy Tasting Party

Learning Log

ELA 5, 8, 12, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21; SCI  3, 6, 22;  SS 2

Music and Movement

gourd shakers; milk carton shakers; juice bottle shakers – fill with cut-up Mardi Gras beads, cover with a piece of cloth and secure with a rubber band

 

 Experiences/

Guest Speakers

a farmer and/or gardener; a veterinarian; field trip to a farm


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Use plastic farm animals, toy barn, and die.  Have students roll die, count the dots and put that number of plastic farm animals in the barn.

 

 

Measurement

Use real horseshoes in different sizes and have students compare sizes of horseshoes.  Have them stack them one on top of the other from largest on the bottom to smallest on top or line them up from left to right smallest to largest.

Geometry

Have students sort large and small plastic farm animals.

Data Collection

BLM Graph:

Prepare small glasses of plain milk, strawberry flavored milk and chocolate flavored milk for each child to taste.  Then graph responses on BLM What flavor of milk do you like?

Patterning

Have students use milk jug caps in different colors to copy, extend, or create patterns.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

a variety of real fruits and vegetables to sort, weigh, measure and examine

seeds and seed packets to match and sort

photographs of farm animals

potting soil and sand for comparison in containers

scale to weigh fruits and vegetables

measuring tape,

mud and grass

a real horseshoe

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

Hot Potato Game;

Duck, Duck, Goose

Farmer in the Dell,

egg relay game using a plastic egg and a spoon

farm animal movements: gallop like a horse; waddle like a duck; sway like a cow; wallow like a pig, etc.

horseshoe game


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

plastic farm animals; a barn; a farmer; a tractor w/ tools; popsicle sticks for fences, corrals, and barns; blue felt or laminated paper for a water source

 

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 9

SS 4

farm puzzles, plastic farm animals for sorting

vegetable lotto game: create lotto boards and cards by gluing clip art or pictures of vegetables onto cardstock, laminate for durability

“Momma-to-baby” animal match game using commercially available cards or make it by gluing pictures of farm animals and their young to cardstock

farm bingo and farm lotto can be made with pictures and cardstock or purchased from a commercial vendor

farm plastic or rubber with a counting mat for animal counters: have students use die, spinners, or numeral cards to determine how many animals to count into a bowl or have students use commercially available patterning cards to copy and extend patterns

eggs to egg carton counting 1-12

Mr. Potato Head people or games

plastic horses with numbered paper red barns for 1-10 counting

3 little pigs props - 3 plastic pigs, Legos® for brick house, sticks for the stick house, and broom straw pieces for straw house for story retelling

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs.

http://www.moomilk.com/index.html

http://www.agclassroom.org/kids/tours.htm

http://www.snaithprimary.eril.net/fodd4.htm

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

farm collage using pictures and clip art of farm-related things such as implements, animals, produce, buildings vegetable prints

milk blowing - pour a little bit of milk on construction paper. Have each child use his/her own drinking straw and blow the milk around the paper making a milk design

corn cob prints

animal stencils and stickers

Kraft sticks for barns and fences

mud painting, feather painting, cotton ball prints, eggshell collage

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

green gerbil bedding, tractor, farm animals, plastic vegetables, mud mixing using potting soil

Water:

ducks on the pond, watering can, blue food coloring, plastic ducks

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Down on Grandpa’s Farm - Raffi

Little White Duck ; Three Little Pigs Blues - Greg & Steve

About the Farm - My Discovery CD

Did you feed my cow? - Ella Jenkins

Bingo, Farmer in the Dell, Old McDonald - Dr. Jean  Nursery Rhymes and Good Ole Times 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

Farm Prop Box: bandanas, apron, farmer’s hat, seed catalogue, tractor steering wheel (real or homemade), gardening gloves, shovel, rake, trowel

Produce stand: vegetable pictures and catalogues, plastic vegetables and fruits, a pan balance, photographs of real vegetables and fruits, a cash register, money, a shopping list with writing implements, and bags to place items bought

 

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

Farmers’ Almanac

grocery advertisements; farm animal puppets

Storytelling Props: 3 plastic pigs, a plastic wolf and “The Three Little Pigs” BLM

 

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as: pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

farm word cards; stamps; stencils; grocery advertisements; Farmers’ Almanac

 


 

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1:  Farm Brainstorming (ELA 3, 4, 10, 16, 22, 24, 28)

 

Materials: computer, chart paper, markers

 

Tell the students, “In this unit, we will be learning about farms.”  Write the word “farm” in the middle of the chart paper.  In response to the statement “Tell me what you know about farms,” have students brainstorm (view literacy strategy descriptions) and then list their responses on the chart.  Using guided discovery, the teacher will ask questions of the students that will lead to information about farms, e.g., “What is the name of the person who works on the farm? What kind of animals live on a farm? What kind of foods are grown on a farm?”  Once the information is gathered, the teacher will show the video clip taken from United Streaming titled, What is a Farm? to the class and lead the class in discussion about farms and farm life.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students in developing a farm vocabulary. If computer or video clip is not available, the teacher may use a general book about farming such as Farming by Gail Gibbons.



Whole Group Activity 2:  Farm Riddle Game   (ELA 22, 23, 24, 27; SCI 2)

 

Materials List:  chart paper or white board, marker, magnetic board, magnetic farm pictures - cow, horse, pig, sheep, farmer, barn

 

Tell the students that they are going to play a farm guessing game.  Read each of the following riddles and encourage the students to guess the correct answer.  When a student provides the correct response, he/she is instructed to hang the appropriate picture on the magnetic board. Write the each animal name on a white board or chart paper as students correctly guess them. Continue playing until all students have provided a correct response.

 

“I am an animal on a farm that has four legs, a long tail, and I produce milk.  Who am I?”

“I am an animal on a farm that lives in a field, eats grass, gallops, and runs fast.  Who am I?”

“I am an animal on a farm that is pink, has a curly tail, and wallows in the mud.  Who am I?”

“I am an animal on a farm that lives in a meadow, has curly fur, and eats grass.  Who am I?”

“I am the worker on the farm that takes care of the animals and the crops.  Who am I?”

“I am the place on the farm where the hay is stored and the tractor is stored.  What am I?”

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who do not respond with correct information by prompting them with leading questions.

 

 

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3:  Farmer in the Dell (ELA 16; M 1, 3; SS 4)

 

Materials List:  farmer’s hat, apron, stethoscope, any book, a ball, a ball of yarn, a picture of a piece of cheese

 

Place the props in the middle of the circle and introduce the song, Farmer in the Dell, to the students.  Once the students have demonstrated that they know the song, the game begins.  A student will be selected to begin the game as the farmer and the teacher will hand the farmer’s hat to the student.  The farmer will then begin singing the song and when the verse referring to farmer picks a wife is sung, the farmer will choose another student to play the role of the wife.  The same procedure is to be followed until each of the props has been selected by students playing the appropriate role (e.g., farmer picks the wife (apron), the wife picks the nurse (stethoscope), nurse picks the child (book), child picks the dog (ball), dog picks the cat (ball of yarn), cat picks the rat (cheese), cheese stands alone). List the names of the game participants on the board when completed. Count the number of participants and describe who was first and last. When this activity is complete, place the props in the dramatic play area for the students to use as a retelling activity.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 


Whole Group Activity 4:  Farmer Grows the Corn   (ELA 24, 26, 27, 29; M 13; SCI 1, 3, 23)

 

Materials List:  photographs of a corn field and a farmer

 

Show the photos of a cornfield and a farmer. Discuss cornfields and how corn grows in the dirt. Introduce and teach the song, The Farmer Grows the Corn (to the tune of Farmer in the Dell)  and corresponding movements to the students.

 

The farmer tills the soil (pretend to dig in the dirt)

The farmer tills the soil

Hi, Ho, the Derry-oh

The farmer tills the soil.

 

The farmer plants the corn (pretend to plant seeds in the ground)

The farmer plants the corn

Hi, Ho, the Derry-oh

The farmer plants the corn.

 


 

The farmer waters the corn  (pretend using a hose to water the corn)

The farmer waters the corn

Hi, Ho, the Derry-oh

The farmer waters the corn.

 

The farmer grows the corn (pretend to be a corn stalk growing toward the sky on tip toes)

The farmer grows the corn

Hi, Ho, the Derry-oh

The farmer grows the corn.

 

The farmer picks the corn (pretend pulling the corn off the stalk)

The farmer picks the corn

Hi, Ho, the Derry-oh

The farmer picks the corn.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 


Whole Group Activity 5:  Egg Relay Game (ELA 3, 23, 24, 29; M  2)

 

Materials List:  two plastic eggs, two large spoons, relay race course

 

Introduce the game to the students; mark off the relay race course; and separate the students into two teams.  Organize the two teams into two single-filed lines, each line standing behind the starting line.  An egg and spoon will be handed to the first student in each line with all other students falling into their respective lines.  Announce, “Ready, Set, Go” to initiate the race.  Upon the command of “Go,” the student with the egg/spoon will move as fast as possible to the turn around line (distance to be determined by playing area).  Should a student drop the egg from the spoon, he/she must stop, retrieve the egg, and resume the race from that spot.  Once the student has touched the turn around line with either foot, he/she returns to the original line and passes the egg/spoon to the next student in line.  The student receiving the egg/spoon must stay behind the starting line until the egg/spoon has been exchanged.  The student who has completed the passing of the egg/spoon moves to the end of the line and sits down, moving forward as each student completes his/her turn.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty: controlling the egg/spoon, standing or sitting in line, demonstrating good sportsmanship.

 


 

Small Group Activities

 

Small Group Activity 1: Types of Farms  (ELA 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 14c, 16, 22; SCI 2, 9, 20, 22)

 

Materials List:  Farming by Gail Gibbons (book), chart paper, markers, photographs of farm products or cut-outs of farm products from newspapers, magazines, etc. (e.g., cheese, milk, cows, bread, corn, vegetables, eggs, lettuce, oranges, apples, grain)

 

Refer to the previous readings from Farming in order to discuss the various types of farms (e.g., dairy, grain, fruit, egg and poultry, vegetables, cattle ranches/farms).  The six types of farms will be listed on the chart paper.  A variety of photographs/cut-outs will be shown to the students who, in turn, will sort and place the specific types of farm products under the correct listing of farm types.  Continue the process until each student has had the opportunity to identify and place a farm product on the chart.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who do not recall the previous readings and/or cannot match specific farm products to farm types.

 

 

Small Group Activity 2: Tractor Trouble (ELA 4, 6, 9, 11, 12b, 12c, 18, 26; SCI 16)

 

Materials List:  Tractor Trouble by Ronne Randall (book), chart paper, paint, markers, variety of tractors with wheels

 

Follow a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions). Show the cover of the text and elicit students’ predictions about the story line.  Write their predictions on the board or chart paper. Ask the students, “Do you see two letters that are the same on the cover of the book?  What letters are they?”  Read the story, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions and to check students’ predictions. Ask the students what happened to the animals and tractor.  Indicate to the students that there are words that sound the same on each page.  These are words that rhyme.  With the class, go through the book and find more words that rhyme. As the students identify the rhyming words, the teacher will list them on the chart.  Discuss the tractor and what it is used for on the farm.  Show the students a toy tractor with big wheels.  Discuss how it is able to move through mud without getting stuck.  Roll the tractor in paint and allow the students to make wheel paintings\ on the chart paper.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 3: Dramatize Farmer and the Beet (ELA 6, 7, 8, 9, 12a, 13, 23, 24; M 3)

 

Materials List:  Farmer and the Beet (book) published by Addison-Wesley, five head bands (each with a picture of farm animals depicted in the text), farmer’s hat

 

Read the book to the students and discuss its story line, specifically the sequence in which each farm animal helped the farmer.  The students will role-play the story line, each wearing the head band depicting the specific farm animals identified in the story.  Have students sequence the order of appearance for each animal in the story to create a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions).  As the students arrange themselves in the order of appearance in the story, have them identify their animal and which position they appear in the story. Emphasize ordinal number words such as first, second, third, etc. Repeat this activity until all students have had a turn to participate.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty with the sequencing of numbers or order of appearance of various characters.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4:  Seed Planting (ELA 23, 24; SCI 1, 3, 8, 20, 23)

 

Materials List:  seed packets, popcorn, potting soil, clear cups, spoons, water spray bottle, hand lens

 

The teacher will present a variety of seed packets to the students.  The teacher will sort different types of seeds into clear cups and distribute the cups to the students.  The students will observ, using a hand lens, and then describe the characteristics of the various types of seeds, e.g., large/small, flat/round, color, thin/fat, round/oval.  Once the seeds have been characterized, they will be placed in the science center for further observation.  Each student will use a cup, spoon, potting soil, and popcorn seeds to simulate the planting of seeds.  When the seeds have been planted, the students will use the spray bottle of water to wet the soil and complete the planting process.  The cups of planted seeds will then be placed in the science center or on a window sill.  The teacher should also convey to the students that once seeds have been planted, they need water, sun light, and fresh air in order to grow.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty characterizing the differences between seeds, planting the seeds, or understanding the growth process for plants.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 5:  A Dairy Tasting Party (ELA 5, 8, 12, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21; SCI 3, 6, 22;  SS 2)

 

Materials List:  milk products (e.g., American cheese, milk, yogurt, whipped cream, butter, cottage cheese, ice cream), ditto paper, markers, paper plates, napkins, wet wipes, The Milk Makers by Gail Gibbons (book)

 

Refer to the book, The Milk Makers, and discuss the variety of products that can be made from milk.  Distribute paper plates, napkins, and wet wipes to each student in preparation for the tasting party.  Each student will be given the opportunity to taste each of the milk by-products and discuss the differences in taste, substance, and texture (e.g., cold, bumpy, sweet, sour, wet, smooth, light).  Upon completion of the taste test each student will complete a learning log page (view literacy strategy descriptions). Give each student a piece of blank paper and a marker to record their favorite milk product. Write the student responses to their favorite milk product on their individual learning log pages. These pages will be bound in a class book and placed in the science center for further use and observation.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty in retaining the information read to them earlier, identifying specific characteristics of the milk products, trying new foods, drawing and writing about the foods.

 

 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

 


 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Whole Group Activity 1:  Student responses to the farm brainstorming activity.

 

·         Small Group Activity 5:  Student responses to the learning log page of the Dairy Tasting Party.

 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

 

Addison-Wesley, The Farmer and the Beet, ISBN: 0-201-19053-2

Andreae, Giles and David  Wojtowycz. Cock-a-Doodle-Doo Barnyard Hullabaloo, ISBN: 0-439-20735-5

Baker, Keith.  Big Fat Hen, ISBN 10: 0152013318

Beaton, Claire. How Big is a Pig, ISBN 10: 184148959X

Brown, Margaret Wise.  Big Red Barn, ISBN: 0-673-81703-2

Canizares, Susan.  On a Farm, ISBN: 0-439-15371-9

Carle, Eric. Rooster Off To See the World, ISBN: 0-590-42565-X

Carroll, Kathleen.  One Red Rooster, ISBN: 0-395-60195-9

Cowen-Fletcher, Jane.  Farmer Will, ISBN: 0-7636-0988-9

Cowley, Joy.  Mrs. Wishy Washy, ISBN: 1-55911-205-0

Cowley, Joy.  Mrs. Wishy Washy’s Farm, ISBN: 0-439-67247-3

Crebbin, June.  Cows in the Kitchen, ISBN: 0-439-05650-0

DK Publishing.  My First Farm: Touch and Feel, ISBN: 0-7894-8524-9

Dunn, Judy.  The Little Pig, ISBN: 0-394-88774-3

Fisher Price. Alphabet Farm, ISBN: 0-766-0319-9

Gibbons, Gail.  Farming, ISBN: 0-8234-0797-7

Gibbons, Gail. Pigs, Pig, ISBN: 0-8234-1554-6

Gibbons, Gail.  The Milk Makers, ISBN: 0-590-45964-3

Graboff, Abner.  Old MacDonald Had a Farm, ISBN: 0-8234-0797-7

Harrison, David. When Cows Come Home, ISBN: 0-590-62345-1

Hill, Eric. Spot Can Count, ISBN: 0-14-056864-8

Hill, Eric. Spot Goes to the Farm, ISBN: 0-399-21434-8

Hinkler Books. Look and Learn: Farm, ISBN: 1-7415-7100-6

Hutchins, Pat.  Rosie’s Walk, ISBN: 0-590-41239-6

Kunhard, Edith. I’m Going to Be a Farmer, ISBN: 0-590-25482-0


 

Lakeshore. Visit the Farm, ISBN: 1-58970415-0

Lillie, Patricia. When the Rooster Crowed, ISBN: 0-15-301469-5

Ling, Mary. See How They Grow: Pig, ISBN: 978-07566-3018-8

McQueen, Lucinda.  The Little Red Hen, ISBN 10: 0590411454

Most, Bernard. The Cow That Went Oink, ISBN: 0-590-48620-9

Pearce, Q. L. and W. J. Pearce. In The Barnyard, ISBN: 0-671-68824-3

Randall, Ronne.  Tractor Trouble, ISBN: 1-40547-461-0

Rius, Maria and J. M. Parramo´n. The Countryside, ISBN: 0-8120-3701-4

Scelsa, Greg.  Down on the Farm, ISBN 10: 0916119653

Schwartz, Amy.  Old MacDonald, ISBN: 0-439-17485-6

Schwartz, David. At The Farm, ISBN: 1-57471-220-9

Seibert, Patricia. (Retold version) The Three Little Pigs, ISBN: 1-57768-367-6

Shaw, Nancy.  Sheep in a Jeep, ISBN: 6-395-41105-X

Shone, Venice.  Cock-a-Doodle-Doo: A Day on the Farm, ISBN: 0-590-45425-0

Sloan, Peter and Sheryl.  At the Farm, ISBN: 1-56801-995-5

Speed, Toby.  Two Cool Cows, ISBN: 0-590-67299-1

Sweet, Melissa. Fiddle-I-Fee (adapted version), ISBN: 0-440-84937-3

Tafuri, Nancy. Spots, Feathers, and Curly Tails, ISBN: 0-395-53881-5

Thompson, Carol.  My Big Farm Book, ISBN: 0-448-46534-5

Troll Associates.  The Three Little Pigs, ISBN: 0-89375-463-3

Wellington, Monica. The Sheep Follow, ISBN: 0-590-22365-8

Westcott, Nadine. Skip to My Lou (Adapted version), ISBN: 0-395-61751-0

Whitehead, Pat. Let’s Go to the Farm, ISBN: 0-8167-0378-7

Williams, Sue.  I Went Walking, ISBN 10: 0152007717

Wood, Jakki.  Moo Moo, Brown Cow, ISBN: 0-15-200533-1

 

Recordings/CDs

 

Brighter Visions.  About the Farm.

Dr. Jean.  The Color Farm.

Greg and Steve.  Rockin’ Down the Road.

Greg and Steve. Big Fun.

Greg and Steve. Fun and Games.

Raffi.  Three Little Pigs Blues.

 



Website Resources

 

http://www.explor.com/animals/  

Louisiana Public Broadcasting (LPB) Cyberchannel, http://www.lpb.org/education/cyberchannel.cfm

o   Let’s explore around the Farm

o   Farm Animals: A First Look

o   Apples

 

 

 


 

Unit 4-2:  Animal Habitats

Study Focus:  Farm (week 2 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to introduce students to farm animals and farm life.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that some animals live on farms. Students will recognize that farm workers take care of the animals on the farm. Students will understand that farm animals produce products used by people.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students identify a farm and the farm environment?
  2. Can students identify what happens on a farm?
  3. Can students identify different varieties of farm animals?
  4. Can students identify the characteristics of farm animals?
  5. Can students identify some of the products produced on farms?

Guiding Vocabulary: farm, farmer, barn, crop, field, fence, gate, tractor, harvest, silo, bale, plow, produce, veterinarian, farm animals (e.g., horse, cow, chicken, rooster, duck, pig, sheep, etc.)

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1c

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by identifying and manipulating onset and rime in words with three sounds (onset of the word cake is /k/ and the rime of the word cake is /ake/) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)


 

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-13

Identify problems and solutions in stories that are read aloud (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-7-E2)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)


 

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)


 

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-12

Determine whether one object weighs more or less than another by using a pan balance (PK-CS-I4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Farm Animals

Pigs

Horses

Poultry

Farm Fun

Whole Group Activities

Bingo

ELA 3, 24, 27, 29; M 3, 13

Fig the Pig Rhyme Game

ELA 1c, 27, 29

Horseshoe game

ELA 23, 24; M 4, 5, 6

The Farmer and the Hen game

M 4, 10

Dramatize Mrs. Wishy Washy

DR-TA

ELA 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12a, 12b, 12c, 13, 14c,

 27

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you ever touched a sheep?

 

 

Can you make the sound pigs make?

Have you ever ridden a horse?

Can you crow like a rooster?

Do you like to play in the mud?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Sheep in a Jeep

 

 

Three Little Pigs

Spot Goes to the Farm

One Red Rooster

Mrs. Wishy Washy’s Farm

Small Group Activities

Bags of Wool

ELA 19, 27; M 1, 2, 4

 

Learning Log: This Little Piggy Went to Market

ELA 7, 10, 16, 17, 18, 26; SS 2, 6

I Went Walking

Story Chain

ELA 6, 7, 8, 10, 12a, 22, 25; M 3; SCI 24

Rosie’s Walk

ELA 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 24, 27; M 10, 11

Professor Know-It-All

ELA 4, 10, 21, 22, 26; SCI 2, 20, 22

Music and Movement

gourd shakers; milk carton shakers; juice bottle shakers – fill with cut-up Mardi Gras beads, cover with a piece of cloth and secure with a rubber band

 

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

a farmer and/or gardener, a veterinarian, field trip to a farm


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Use plastic farm animals, toy barn, and die.  Have students roll die, count the dots and put that number of plastic farm animals in the barn.

 

 

Measurement

Use real horseshoes in different sizes and have students compare sizes of horseshoes.  Have them stack them one on top of the other from largest on the bottom to smallest on top.

Geometry

Have students sort large and small plastic farm animals.

Data Collection

BLM Graph:

What is your favorite farm animal?

Patterning

Have students use milk jug caps in different colors to copy, extend, or create patterns.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

a variety of real fruits and vegetables to sort, weigh, measure and examine

seeds and seed packets to match and sort

photographs of farm animals

potting soil and sand for comparison in containers

scale to weigh fruits and vegetables

measuring tape,

mud and grass

a real horseshoe

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

Hot Potato Game;

Duck, Duck, Goose

Farmer in the Dell,

egg relay game using a plastic egg and a spoon

farm animal movements: gallop like a horse, waddle like a duck, sway like a cow, wallow like a pig.

horseshoe game


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10,11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

plastic farm animals; a barn; a farmer; a tractor w/ tools; popsicle sticks for fences, corrals, and barns; blue felt or laminated paper for a water source

 

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

farm puzzles, plastic farm animals for sorting

vegetable lotto game: create lotto boards and cards by gluing clip art or pictures of vegetables onto cardstock, laminate for durability

“Momma-to-baby” animal match game using commercially available cards or make it by gluing pictures of farm animals and their young to cardstock

farm bingo and farm lotto can be made with pictures and cardstock or purchased from a commercial vendor

farm animal counts with counting mats: have students use die, spinners, or numeral cards to determine how many animals to count into a bowl or have students use commercially available patterning cards to copy and extend patterns

eggs to egg carton counting 1-12

Mr. Potato Head people or games

plastic horses with numbered paper red barns for 1-10 counting

3 little pigs props - 3 plastic pigs, Legos® for brick house, sticks for the stick house, and broom straw pieces for straw house for story retelling

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://www.moomilk.com/index.html

http://www.agclassroom.org/kids/tours.htm

http://www.snaithprimary.eril.net/fodd4.htm

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

farm collage using pictures and clip art of farm-related things such as implements, animals, produce, buildings vegetable prints

milk blowing - pour a little bit of milk on construction paper. Have each child use his/her own drinking straw and blow the milk around the paper making a milk design

corn cob prints

animal stencils and stickers

Kraft sticks for barns and fences

mud painting, feather painting, cotton ball prints, eggshell collage

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

green gerbil bedding, tractor, farm animals, plastic vegetables, mud mixing using potting soil

Water:

ducks on the pond, watering can, blue food coloring, plastic ducks


 

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Down on Grandpa’s Farm - Raffi

Little White Duck ; Three Little Pigs Blues - Greg & Steve

About the Farm - My Discovery CD

Did you feed my cow? - Ella Jenkins

Bingo, Farmer in the Dell, Old McDonald - Dr. Jean  Nursery Rhymes and Good Ole Times 

Chicken Dance -  DJ’s Choice Kids’ Fun

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

Farm Prop Box: bandanas, apron, farmer’s hat, seed catalogue, tractor steering wheel (real or homemade), gardening gloves, shovel, rake, trowel

Produce stand: vegetable pictures and catalogues, plastic vegetables and fruits, a pan balance, photographs of real vegetables and fruits, a cash register, money, a shopping list with writing implements, and bags to place items bought

 

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

Farmers’ Almanac

grocery advertisements

Storytelling Props: 3 plastic pigs, a plastic wolf and house blackline masters for story retelling

farm animal puppets

 

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as: pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

farm word cards; stamps; stencils; grocery advertisements; Farmers’ Almanac

 

 


 

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1:  Bingo Is His Name-O   (ELA 3, 24, 27, 29; M 3, 13)

 

Materials List: a set of individual letter cards that spell the name “Bingo” (B, i, n, g, o) with a picture of a dog on the back of each, a single card with a picture of the dog with Bingo written under it (all cards should have a magnetic strip for use on a magnetic board), magnetic board

 

Teach the students the traditional song “Bingo.”  Place the picture of a dog, “Bingo,” with its name written under the picture on the magnetic board. Then place the individual letter cards in the correct order to spell “Bingo,” introducing each letter as it is placed on the board. Have the students practice the song.

 

There was a farmer had a dog,
And Bingo was his name-Oh.
B-I-N-G-O!
B-I-N-G-O!
B-I-N-G-O!
And Bingo was his name-Oh!

 

Choose five students to come up to the board and pick a letter card. Have the students stand in order to spell “Bingo.” All of the students will sing the Bingo song.  As each letter is sung, the student with the letter will hold up his/her card.

 

Next, teach the students how to sing the song, replacing one letter, then two letters, etc., with a clap as indicated below.  The students holding the letters on which a clap is made should flip their cards over to show the picture of Bingo. This will let students know when to clap as the verses are sung. 

 

(All letters are shown)

There was a farmer had a dog,
And Bingo was his name-Oh.
B-I-N-G-O!
B-I-N-G-O!
B-I-N-G-O!
And Bingo was his name-Oh!

(Student holding B flips his/her card over)
There was a farmer had a dog,
And Bingo was his name-Oh.


 

CLAP-I-N-G-O!
CLAP-I-N-G-O!
CLAP-I-N-G-O!
And Bingo was his name-Oh!

(Students holding B and I flip their cards over)

There was a farmer had a dog,
And Bingo was his name-Oh.
CLAP, CLAP-N-G-O!
CLAP, CLAP-N-G-O!
CLAP, CLAP-N-G-O!
And Bingo was his name-Oh!

(Students holding B, I, and N flip their cards over)
There was a farmer had a dog,
And Bingo was his name-Oh.
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP-G-O!
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP-G-O!
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP-G-O!
And Bingo was his name-Oh!

(Students holding B, I, N, and G flip their cards over)
There was a farmer had a dog,
And Bingo was his name-Oh.
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP-O!
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP-O!
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP-O!
And Bingo was his name-Oh!

(Students holding B, I, N, G, and O flip their cards over)
There was a farmer had a dog,
And Bingo was his name-Oh.
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP
CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP, CLAP
And Bingo was his name-Oh!

 

Following the activity, reinforce the sequential order of the letters by asking the students which letter in the word “Bingo” is first, second, third, fourth, and last.  Place the letters on the magnetic board as the students identify the letters in the correct order.

 

Accommodations: Assist students who have difficulty identifying the letters in the word “Bingo” and with sequential ordering of the letters.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2:  Fig the Pig (ELA 1c, 27, 29)

 

Materials List:  Create a file folder game that uses a laminated window on the front of an 8x10 manila filing folder.  Cut the outline of a pig from the front of the folder so that the clear, laminated window reveals the figure of the pig.  Staple the sides of the folder together to form a pocket with an opening at the top.  Fill the folder with assorted colors of construction paper.

 

Introduce the Fig the Pig color game (similar to Scat the Cat) to the students.  Fill the laminated folder with assorted colors of construction paper with the window of the pig in front.  When the teacher and students have completed reciting the rhyme, the teacher shows a colored piece of construction paper through the window on the front of the folder and says, “Yellow!”  The students will follow in kind, saying “Yellow” in unison.  Continue the process until all colors have been identified.

 

I’m Fig the Pig,

I’m chubby and big,

And I can change my color

With a jiggity-jig!

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who do not recognize the colors or have difficulty in reciting the rhyme.

 

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3:  Horseshoe Game   (ELA 23, 24; M 4, 5, 6)

 

Materials List:  rubber horseshoes, horseshoe posts, 1 dice

 

Organize the students into two teams.  Each team will stay in their respective lines with the first student in line standing, the others sitting.  The teacher will roll the dice, and the class will identify the number of dots on the dice, e.g., up to six.  The first student in line will then throw the number of horseshoes identified on the dice at the horseshoe post.  When the students have thrown the correct number of horseshoes, they will move to the back of the line and sit with the others.  Continue this process until each student has had the opportunity to throw the horseshoes. Additional questions to ask: Who threw more horseshoes? Who threw less horseshoes? Which side had more or less horseshoes? When this activity is complete, place the props in the dramatic play area for the students to use as a retelling activity.

 

Accommodations:  If the activity is too lengthy, introduce it as a whole group activity and provide opportunities for the students to use the activity during center times.

 

Whole Group Activity 4:  The Farmer and the Hen Game (M 4, 10)

 

Materials List:  numbered cards 1-10, two baskets each holding 10 plastic eggs

 

Organize the students into two lines.  One student from each team will begin the game playing the role of the hen.  These two students will sit across the play area from the rest of the students at a point designated by an X on the floor.  Each of the two hens will have 10 eggs placed in front of them.  The first student in line will play the role of the farmer and will stand in the front of the line with an empty basket. The teacher will show a number card to the class.  The class will verbally identify the number.  Once the number has been identified, the farmer will run to the hen with the basket.  Both the farmer and the hen will pick up the number of eggs identified and place them in the basket.  The farmer shows the basket to the teacher for evaluation.  Once the teacher has determined that the number of eggs in the basket is correct, the teacher reinforces the performance and hands the basket back to the farmer.  The farmer empties the eggs from the basket and places the basket back on the X.  The farmer then becomes the new hen, sits and waits for the next farmer to come.  The old hen returns to the line and hands the basket to the next student in line who becomes the new farmer. 

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty identifying the correct number of eggs or those who have difficulty understanding the changing of roles, e.g., farmer and hen counting eggs, farmer shows basket to teacher, farmer returns basket to X, farmer becomes new hen, old hen returns to line, new farmer.  If the activity is too lengthy, introduce it as a whole group activity and provide opportunities for the students to use the activity during center times or outdoor times.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5:  Dramatize Mrs. Wishy Washy    (ELA 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12a, 12b, 12c, 13, 14c, 27)

 

Materials List:  Mrs. Wishy Washy by Joy Cowley (book), a plastic wash tub, a plastic cow, a plastic pig, a plastic duck, a soft bristle scrubber, dry erase board and markers

 

Use a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions). Show the cover of the book to the class and ask the students to predict what they think the story line will be.  Write students’ predictions on the board. The story props will be placed in front of the students.  The teacher will then read the story.  As the teacher retells the story, the students will act out each scene using the props. The teacher will pause periodically to check students’ predictions and ask simple questions regarding the story line. Once the story has been acted out by the students, the teacher will lead a discussion that addresses the sequence in which the animals appear; e.g., the cow came first, the pig came second, etc. Place the props in the book center for the students to use as they retell the story during centers.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

Small Group Activities

 

 

Small Group Activity 1:  Bags of Wool (ELA 19, 27; M 1, 2, 4)

 

Materials List:  small lunch brown paper bag for each student, 10 cotton balls for each student, paper and marker for each student

 

Teach the nursery rhyme, Baa, Baa Black Sheep.  The students and teacher will repeat the rhyme.  Each student will be handed a brown bag and 10 cotton balls.  The students will be instructed to fill their bags with “wool” (cotton balls).  Allow the students a chance to explore this activity by self-selecting the number of cotton balls they will put in their respective bags (i.e., from 1-10).  The teacher will circulate and engage each student in discussion about how many cotton balls they used, why that number, etc.  Each student will draw a cotton ball and then write the number of cotton balls they used on a piece of paper inside the drawn cotton ball.  Each student will then show their written number and tell it to the group. 

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty counting or writing the numbers.

 

 

Small Group Activity 2:  This Little Piggy Went to the Market (ELA 7, 10, 16, 17, 18, 26; SS 2, 6)

 

Materials List:  paper and markers for each student

 

Teach the nursery rhyme, This Little Piggy Went to Market.  Have students repeat the nursery rhyme with the teacher.  Discuss the rhyme and its meaning. Ask questions about what could be bought at a market. Once the students have demonstrated that they know the rhyme, they will repeat the rhyme inserting a new place that Little Piggy could visit (e.g., playground, Disney World, beach, etc.) and then continue the rhyme as before. Have students complete a learning log page (view literacy strategy descriptions) by drawing a picture of Little Piggy visiting his new destination. Take dictation from students telling where Little Piggy is visiting on their learning log page. Compile the pages into a class book to be placed in the Book center of the classroom.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty in choosing places to visit or gluing the cut-outs on the paper.

 

 


Small Group Activity 3: I Went Walking   (ELA 6, 7, 8, 10, 12a, 22, 25; M 3; SCI 24)

 

Materials List:  I Went Walking by Sue Williams (book), story props (e.g., cut-outs for each animal depicted in the text)

 

Read the book to the class, pausing where appropriate for questions and comments.  Following a discussion of the story line, include questions about where students have gone walking. Distribute story props to each student.  Have the students retell the story using the story props by creating a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions). As the students stand with their animals, encourage them to orally identify their character and the order in which the animal appeared in the story.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty playing well with others and waiting their turn to use their selected story prop; sequencing the order of appearance of each animal.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4: Rosie’s Walk (ELA 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 24, 27; M 10, 11)

 

Materials List:  Rosie’s Walk by Pat Hutchins (book), cut-outs of Rosie, student-made depiction of haystacks, paper, yellow and brown crayons

 

Read the story and lead a discussion about Rosie’s adventures including questions about directional words.  Each student will be given a piece of paper and one yellow crayon and one brown crayon to be used to draw a haystack.  Upon completion of their drawing, the students will use their Rosie picture to tell the story in keeping with the teacher’s use of directional words (e.g., Rosie under the haystack, Rosie on top of the haystack).

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty creating a haystack; understanding the directional words.

 

 

Small Group Activity 5:  Professor Know-it-All (ELA 4, 10, 21, 22, 26; SCI 2, 20, 22)

 

Materials List:  Professor Know-it-All hat or crown, markers, chart paper

 

Culminate the unit on animal habitats with a comprehensive discussion of all concepts used to address farming.  Following this review, each student will be given an opportunity to play the role of professor know-it-all (view literacy strategy descriptions) by wearing the designated hat or crown and stating a specific farm fact that he or she has learned.  The teacher will compile their responses into a Farm Facts chart to be displayed in the science center.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty being specific about what they have learned.

 

 


Sample Assessments

 

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Small Group Activity 2:  The teacher will document the student responses to the learning log  page, “This Little Piggy Went to . . . “

 

·         Small Group Activity 5:  The teacher will document the students’ responses to “Professor Know-it-All” farm facts.

 

 

Resources

Children’s Books

 

Addison-Wesley, The Farmer and the Beet, ISBN: 0-201-19053-2

Andreae, Giles and David  Wojtowycz. Cock-a-Doodle-Doo Barnyard Hullabaloo, ISBN: 0-439-20735-5

Baker, Keith.  Big Fat Hen, ISBN 10: 0152013318

Beaton, Claire. How Big is a Pig, ISBN 10: 184148959X

Brown, Margaret Wise.  Big Red Barn, ISBN: 0-673-81703-2

Canizares, Susan.  On a Farm, ISBN: 0-439-15371-9

Carle, Eric. Rooster Off To See the World, ISBN: 0-590-42565-X

Carroll, Kathleen.  One Red Rooster, ISBN: 0-395-60195-9

Cowen-Fletcher, Jane.  Farmer Will, ISBN: 0-7636-0988-9

Cowley, Joy.  Mrs. Wishy Washy, ISBN: 1-55911-205-0

Cowley, Joy.  Mrs. Wishy Washy’s Farm, ISBN: 0-439-67247-3

 

Crebbin, June.  Cows in the Kitchen, ISBN: 0-439-05650-0

DK Publishing.  My First Farm: Touch and Feel, ISBN: 0-7894-8524-9

Dunn, Judy.  The Little Pig, ISBN: 0-394-88774-3

Fisher Price. Alphabet Farm, ISBN: 0-766-0319-9

Gibbons, Gail.  Farming, ISBN: 0-8234-0797-7

Gibbons, Gail. Pigs, Pig, ISBN: 0-8234-1554-6

Gibbons, Gail.  The Milk Makers, ISBN: 0-590-45964-3

Graboff, Abner.  Old MacDonald Had a Farm, ISBN: 0-8234-0797-7

Harrison, David. When Cows Come Home, ISBN: 0-590-62345-1

Hill, Eric. Spot Can Count, ISBN: 0-14-056864-8

Hill, Eric. Spot Goes to the Farm, ISBN: 0-399-21434-8

Hinkler Books. Look and Learn: Farm, ISBN: 1-7415-7100-6

Hutchins, Pat.  Rosie’s Walk, ISBN: 0-590-41239-6

Kunhard, Edith. I’m Going to Be a Farmer, ISBN: 0-590-25482-0

Lakeshore. Visit the Farm, ISBN: 1-58970415-0

Lillie, Patricia. When the Rooster Crowed, ISBN: 0-15-301469-5

Ling, Mary. See How They Grow: Pig, ISBN: 978-07566-3018-8

McQueen, Lucinda.  The Little Red Hen, ISBN 10: 0590411454

Most, Bernard. The Cow That Went Oink, ISBN: 0-590-48620-9

Pearce, Q. L. and W. J. Pearce. In The Barnyard, ISBN: 0-671-68824-3

Randall, Ronne.  Tractor Trouble, ISBN: 1-40547-461-0

Rius, Maria and J. M. Parramo´n. The Countryside, ISBN: 0-8120-3701-4

Scelsa, Greg.  Down on the Farm, ISBN 10: 0916119653

Schwartz, Amy.  Old MacDonald, ISBN: 0-439-17485-6

Schwartz, David. At The Farm, ISBN: 1-57471-220-9

Seibert, Patricia. (Retold version) The Three Little Pigs, ISBN: 1-57768-367-6

Shaw, Nancy.  Sheep in a Jeep, ISBN: 6-395-41105-X

Shone, Venice.  Cock-a-Doodle-Doo: A Day on the Farm, ISBN: 0-590-45425-0

Sloan, Peter and Sheryl.  At the Farm, ISBN: 1-56801-995-5

Speed, Toby.  Two Cool Cows, ISBN: 0-590-67299-1

Sweet, Melissa. Fiddle-I-Fee (adapted version), ISBN: 0-440-84937-3

Tafuri, Nancy. Spots, Feathers, and Curly Tails, ISBN: 0-395-53881-5

Thompson, Carol.  My Big Farm Book, ISBN: 0-448-46534-5

Troll Associates.  The Three Little Pigs, ISBN: 0-89375-463-3

Wellington, Monica. The Sheep Follow, ISBN: 0-590-22365-8

Westcott, Nadine. Skip to My Lou (Adapted version), ISBN: 0-395-61751-0

 

Whitehead, Pat. Let’s Go to the Farm, ISBN: 0-8167-0378-7

Williams, Sue.  I Went Walking, ISBN 10: 0152007717

Wood, Jakki.  Moo Moo, Brown Cow, ISBN: 0-15-200533-1

 

 

Recordings/CDs

 

Brighter Visions.  About the Farm.

DJ’s Choice Kids’ Fun  

Dr. Jean.  The Color Farm.,

Dr. Jean, Nursery Rhymes and Good Ole Times,  Bingo, Farmer in the Dell, Old McDonald

Greg and Steve.  Rockin’ Down the Road.

Greg and Steve.  Big Fun.

Greg and Steve.  Fun and Games.

Greg and Steve.  Playing Favorites.

Palmer, Hap and Martha. Witches Brew.

 

Website Resources

 

Louisiana Public Broadcasting (LPB) Cyberchannel, http://www.lpb.org/education/cyberchannel.cfm

o   Let’s explore around the Farm

o   Farm Animals:  A First Look

o   Apples


Unit 4-3:  Animal Habitats

Study Focus:  Zoo (week 1 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to introduce students to the purposes of zoos, the jobs of zoo keepers, and the animals that often live in zoos.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that animals live in zoos and people visit zoos. Students will understand that zoo keepers take care of the animals in the zoo.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students identify a zoo environment?
  2. Can students identify what happens in zoos?
  3. Can students identify different varieties of zoo animals?
  4. Can students identify the characteristics of zoo animals?

Guiding Vocabulary: zoo, zookeeper, habitat, cages, reptile, amphibian, mammal, bird, nocturnal, wild, endangered, diet, carnivore, herbivore, and omnivore, observer, biologist, veterinarian

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)


 

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)


 

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)


 

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 

 


 

 Study Focus

 

What Is a Zoo?

Who works in a Zoo?

Big Cats

Elephants

 

Monkeys

 

Whole Group Activities

Zoo by Gail Gibbons

Brainstorm

ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14c, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 20, 22; SS 2

I Want to be a Zookeeper by Dan Liebman

ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 20, 22; SS 2

Lion Vs. Tiger by Isabel Thomas

Graphic Organizer

ELA 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14c, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28,  29; SCI 20, 22; SS 2

Elephant (Watch Me Grow) by DK Publishing

ELA 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; M 6; SCI 20, 22; SS 2

Little Monkey Lost by Keith DuQuette

Story Chain

ELA 4,5,6,8,9,10,11,

12b,14c,16,18,21,22,26,

27,28, 29; SCI 20,22; SS 2

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you ever been to a zoo?

Would you like to work in a zoo?

Do you like tigers?

Would you ride an elephant?

Do you like monkeys?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Going to the Zoo by Tom Paxton

 

 

Zoo Looking by Mem Fox

Who is the Beast? by Keith Baker

The Happy Hippopotami by Bill Martin, Jr.

Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed by Eileen Christelow

Small Group Activities

RAFT – Zoo Animals

ELA 15,19,20,21,22,

23,24,26; SCI 20

Graph:

Would You Like to Be a Zookeeper?

ELA 9,11,14,23,24, 31; M 2,5,12; SS 3

Torn paper Tigers 

Patterning

ELA 21,22,23,24,26; M 8,10,11,13

Counting zoo animals

ELA 21,22,23,24,26; M 1,2,4,11

Monkey Bread

ELA 21,22,23,24,26; M 2,8,10,11; SCI 3,7

Music and Movement

African, Asian, and South American instruments such as maracas, bongo drums, and rainsticks

 

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

zoo docents(volunteers) visit the school; zoo field trip (use the BLM zoo animal checklist: duplicate for each student, put them on clipboards and provide crayons for students to check off each animal as they find them at the zoo)


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Use strawberry baskets for cages, small plastic zoo animals and spinner or die.  Have students put the number of animals in a cage according to the spinner or die toss.

 

 

Measurement

Print out animal track pictures from http://www.bear-tracker.com/  or similar website. Encourage students to compare size of tracks and span of tracks to determine which animals are larger and smaller.

Geometry

Provide construction paper geometric shapes and paper plates for students to make shapes of animals. Have students use the paper plates for the animal bodies.  Plates can also be cut in half to introduce that concept.

Data Collection

BLM Graph: Have you ever been to the zoo?

Patterning

Have students copy, extend or create patterns with plastic zoo animals

Science

SCI 1,2,3,4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11

SS 4

learning logs and  writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

wild animal puzzles

wild animal memory game

check with local pet stores or snake owners to obtain a snake skin for students to observe

feathers for observation

 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

feed the animals bean bag toss: tape pictures of animals to shoe boxes then have students “feed” the animals by tossing bean bags into the boxes

move like the animals: create cards with pictures of animals; have students take turns drawing a card and moving like that animal

monkey see, monkey do: students take turns making movements and the rest of the group copies the movement

 


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

wild animals and items to create animal habitats such as blue and green felt for water and grass, plastic trees, and decorative rocks

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, , 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

wild animal counters and counting mats - have students use a die or spinner to determine the number of animals to place on the counting mat, or label each counting mat with a numeral 1 – 10 and have students count out the corresponding number on the mat

strawberry baskets for sorting and counting animal counters (use die, spinner or numeral cards to determine number)

wild animal puzzle

wild animal matching

wild animal patterning

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs.

http://pbskids.org/mamamirabelle/funstuff_friends.html

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/animal-adventure/index.html

http://www.hoglezoo.org/kids/

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/animal-adventure/games/game_animal_spot.html

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

animal print fabric and paper, wiggle eyes, Easter grass, twigs, string, yarn, etc. for zoo collages

box sculpture animals

paper plate lions

animal sponge prints

 

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

zoo animals that live on land

small trees and jeeps

 

Water:

zoo animals that live in water

 

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Going to the Zoo - Raffi

Zebras, Monkey See Monkey Do, Dark in the Jungle, Wild and Wooley - Johnette Downing:

Monkeys and the Alligator, Tarzan, Elephant Song, The Cool Bear Hunt, The Alligator Chant – Dr. Jean

Animal Action - Greg and Steve

3 Elephants – Jack Hartman


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

small stuffed animals and boxes for students to create a zoo

zookeeper props such as khaki colored caps or safari hats

clipboards and pencils

pretend binoculars or teacher made ones created from cardboard tubes taped together

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

magazines such as Ranger Rick, Zoo Books, or Your Big Backyard

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as: pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers

zoo animal word cards: take pictures of wild animals (clip art, magazine pictures, photos) and put them on strips of card stock, print the name of the animal on the card next to or above the picture, laminate for durability.

 

Whole Group Activities

Whole Group Activity 1: What is a Zoo? (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14c, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 20, 22; SS 2)

 

Materials List: What Is a Zoo? (book) by Gail Gibbons; Going to the Zoo (song) by Raffi , chart paper graphic organizer and 2 different colored markers

 

 

Play and sing Going to the Zoo from the Raffi CD Singable Songs for the Very Young. Encourage students to move like the animals in the song.

 

Begin a graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions) in the form of a KWL chart by writing “What we KNOW about the zoo” at the top of the chart paper. Have students tell what they know about the zoo while you write their ideas on the chart. Post this chart on the wall or board where it is accessible for additions. On a new piece of chart paper write “What we WONDER about the zoo” at the top of the paper. Ask students to think of things they wonder about the zoo or questions they have about the zoo. Write student responses on this chart paper.

 

Introduce the book, What Is a Zoo? by Gail Gibbons, by showing its cover and title. Read the book aloud, pointing to the words and pausing for comments and questions where appropriate.

 

Following the reading, ask students if they found out something new from the book. Refer to the WONDER chart to see if students’ questions were answered. Guide students to see that their questions were answered by the book and now their new knowledge can be recorded on a new chart. At the top of a new piece of chart paper write “What we LEARNED about the zoo” and have students tell you what they learned about the zoo from the book. Review all three parts of the KWL before posting them in a place where students can refer back to them throughout the unit.

 

Close by singing “Going to the Zoo” again.

 

Accommodations: Assist students in identifying what they know about the zoo and verbalizing that knowledge.

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Who Works in a Zoo? (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 20, 22; SS 2)

 

Materials List: I Want to be a Zookeeper by Dan Liebman (book), Hear the Animals (song), props for dressing like a zookeeper-cap, apron, push broom, pail, scrub brush

 

Dress in the zookeeper apron and cap and have the other props handy.

 

Open with the song, Hear the Animals:        

                                   (tune: She’ll be Coming ‘Round the Mountain)

 

                                    You can hear the lions roaring at the zoo,

                                    ROAR! ROAR!

                                    You can hear the lions roaring at the zoo,

                                    ROAR! ROAR!

                                    You can hear the lions roaring.

                                    You can hear the lions roaring.

                                    You can hear the lions roaring at the zoo,

                                    ROAR! ROAR!

                                                           

                                   


 

Repeat the following stanzas in the same pattern:

                                   

You can hear snakes hissing… SSSS! SSSS!

                                    You can hear bears growling… GROWL!

                                    You can hear zebras braying… HEEHAW!

                                    You can hear monkeys chattering… OOHOOHAHA!        

                                    You can hear tigers growling… GRRR!

 

Make the song longer or shorter to fit the needs of your class. Encourage students to verbally and physically imitate the animals in the song.

 

After the song, show students the zookeeper props and ask them why they think you are dressed like that and why you are carrying these things. Lead them to recognize the props as things a zookeeper might need. Ask students what kinds of jobs they believe the zookeepers do in the zoo. List the student responses on a chart paper or board.

 

Introduce the book by displaying the cover and title I Want to be a Zookeeper by Dan Liebman. Read the story, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions. Read aloud the student generated list and ask students if they learned new information from the story and ask them to share that new information.

 

Accommodations: Provide extra support to students having difficulty expressing their knowledge of zookeepers.

 

Venn DiagramWhole Group Activity 3: Big Cats (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14c, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 20, 22; SS 2)

 

Materials List: Lion Vs. Tiger by Isabel Thomas(book), graphic organizer drawn on chart paper (see illustration below),  L-I-O-N (song), pictures of lions, tigers, and other big cats, Lions  and Tigers BLM, scotch tape

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open with the song, L-I-O-N

                                (tune: Bingo)

 

I know an animal who lives in a zoo

And lion is his name-o.

L-I-O-N, L-I-O-N, L-I-O-N

And lion is his name-o!

 

Repeat the song using T-I-G-E-R in place of L-I-O-N.

 

Show students the pictures of lions, tigers and other big cats. Discuss the characteristics of each animal. Point out ways they are different and alike throughout your discussion.

 

Introduce the book, displaying the cover and reading the title Big Cats by Seymour Simon. Read it aloud to students, pausing where appropriate for questions and comments. Show students the Venn diagram graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions). Explain that you have some facts about lions and some facts about tigers and some facts about both lions and tigers written on slips of paper and you need their help figuring out where

the facts belong. Call up students to pull a fact slip out of a container where you previously put them. Read the fact aloud and ask students if this fact is about lions, about tigers, or about both. Tape the fact slip in the correct part of the Venn diagram. Repeat in the same way until all the facts have been placed on the diagram, then review the diagram with the students. Point out that using the diagram helps us see how lions and tigers are the same and how they are different from one another.

 

Close by singing “L-I-O-N” and/or “T-I-G-E-R.”

 

Accommodations: Give oral prompts to students having difficulty identifying to which animal the facts can be attributed.

 

Whole Group Activity 4: Elephants (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; M 6; SCI 20, 22; SS 2)

Materials List: Elephant (Watch Me Grow) by DK Publishing (book), Elephants (song from Dr. Jean and Friends CD), chart paper with a large outline drawing of an elephant, measuring tape

 

Open with the song, Elephants, from Dr. Jean and Friends CD.

 


 

Elephants

Elephants walk like this and that.
They're terribly big and terribly fat.
They have no hands, they have no toes.
But goodness, gracious, what a nose!

 

Introduce the book, displaying the cover and reading the title Elephant (Watch Me Grow) by DK Publishing. Read the book aloud to the students, pausing for questions and comments where appropriate. Ask students to recall elephant facts from the book and write them on the elephant chart. Discuss the size of an elephant. Adult elephants can reach seven and a half feet tall. Use the measuring tape to show students how tall some elephants can grow to be.

 

Close with the Elephants song.

 

Accommodations: Give multiple concrete examples of the size of an elephant: have students pace off the distance or have students lay head to toe on the floor to demonstrate a relative comparison of how tall an adult elephant can grow to be.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5: Monkeys (GLEs: ELA 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 14c, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 20, 22; SS 2)

 

Materials List: Little Monkey Lost (book) by Keith DuQuette, Five Little Monkeys (song) from Dr. Jean and Friends CD,  chart titled “Who Did Little Monkey Meet?”

 

Open with the song Five Little Monkeys from Dr. Jean and Friends CD.

 

Ask students if they have ever seen a monkey. Discuss where they saw monkeys and what they know about monkeys. Ask them if all monkeys are the same. Tell them that the story you are about to read is about a little monkey who gets lost and meets lots of different kinds of monkeys. Read the book, pausing for questions and comments. Point out the chart and read the question, “Who Did Little Monkey Meet?” Create a modified story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) by having groups of students take turns recalling, in sequence, each group of monkeys they met. Ask one student in each group to verify that his/her group got the sequence correct. Ask students if all the monkeys are the same. Lead students to identify some of the differences they saw in the monkeys in the story.

 

Close by reviewing the list of things little monkey learned from all the other monkeys.

 

Accommodations: Prompt students having difficulty recalling the sequence of the monkeys as they appear in the story.

 

Small Group Activities

 

Small Group Activity 1: Zoo Animals (GLEs: ELA 15, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26; SCI 20)

 

Materials List: pictures of a wide variety of animals commonly seen in zoos; crayons, markers, or colored pencils; teacher-made word/picture cards of zoo animals

 

Display the animal pictures in the center of the table. Tell students they are to choose an animal they would like to be and make a sign that will tell zoo visitors about themselves. Invite students to look at the pictures and choose one they would like to be for this modified RAFT

(view literacy strategy descriptions).

 

For this RAFT, students will do the following:

                        R – Take on the Role of the Zoo Animal

                        A – Write/Draw a sign for the Audience of Zoo Visitors

                        F – The Form is a Zoo Sign

                        T – The Topic is Name, Drawing and Fact about the Animal

 

Give each student a piece of paper for their sign. Have students who are able to do so, write their first names on the back of the paper. Write the first names of students who are not yet able to write their own names. Have students draw a picture of the animal they chose on the front of the paper. Students may also copy the name of the animal chosen from the word/picture cards, if they are able. Encourage students to think of at least one fact they know about their animal. Have students dictate the name of the animal they are pretending to be and one or more fact they know about the animal. Write each student’s dictation on his/her Zoo Sign.

 

Gather all the Zoo Signs for a zoo bulletin board and/or assemble them into a class book. At the next group gathering, take a moment to share the Zoo Signs with the class before displaying or putting them into a book for the science or library center.

 

Accommodations: Give oral or visual prompts to students having difficulty identifying favorite animal. Provide informational books for students to locate facts about the animals they chose.

 


Small Group Activity 2: Would You Like to be a Zookeeper? (GLEs: ELA 9, 11, 23, 24, 31; M 2, 5, 12; SS 3)

 

Materials List: teacher-made graph (see illustration); individual student photos

 

Would You Like to be a Zookeeper? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes

No


Prepare the graph on poster board or chart paper. Laminate for durability. Make graph markers for each student using photos of each student sized to approximately 2 x 3 inches. Laminate and cut apart the photos so they can be reused for other activities.

 

Invite students to put their photo on the graph. Read the question to students, then assist them in taping their photo in the column according to their response to the question.

 

At the next circle gathering, review the graph. Ask students which response has more and which has fewer pictures. Ask students to explain why they think one has more or fewer photos. Then count the actual number of photos in each column and discuss which number is more or less.

 

Accommodations: Assist students having difficulty placing a marker on the graph. Assist students in counting and identifying the correct number of markers in each column of the graph.

 


Small Group Activity 3: Torn Paper Tigers (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 26; M 8, 10, 11, 13)

 

Materials List: orange and green construction paper; black crayons; glue; pictures of tigers

 

Prior to the activity, cut the orange construction paper as follows:

1 half sheet per student

2 quarter sized sheets per student

 

Display the pictures of the tigers. Explain to students they are going to make their own tiger picture. Show students how to tear around the edges of the half sheet of orange construction paper into a rectangle shape. This is the body of the tiger. Show students how to tear the smaller, quartered pieces of orange paper into legs, a tail, and a head for their tiger body. Assist students in assembling and gluing their tiger parts on the green construction paper. Give each student a black crayon to draw stripes on their tiger. Encourage them to notice that the stripes are in an AB pattern: orange, black, orange, black…. Help students use crayons or markers to add eyes, nose, and whiskers to their tigers too. The end products of this activity should not be identical to one another. Allow students to try making their tigers look like individual works.

 

Accommodations: Assist students having difficulty with tearing paper by providing thinner paper such as colored copy paper for tearing.

 

Small Group Activity 4: Counting Zoo Animals (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 26; M 1, 2, 4, 11)

 

Materials List: small toy animals or animal erasers, number cards, Zoo Animal BLM counting mats for each student

 

Prior to the activity, print out enough copies of the BLM counting mat for each student to have one. For durability, laminate the mats.

 

Give each student at least 10 small toy animal counters and a counting mat. Have students look at the number card you are holding up, then count out that number of animals onto the mat. Continue this procedure for each number card. Increase or decrease difficulty by changing the number cards: lower (1 – 5) and fewer number cards for less skilled students; higher (6 or higher) number cards to challenge more advanced students. To create even more challenge, create simple adding and subtraction stories for students to represent on the counting mats.

 

Observe and document student skills in counting objects, association of sets to numbers, and number recognition.

 

Accommodations: Use lower numbers for students with less number experience and higher numbers for those who are ready to identify and count higher numbers.

 

 

Small Group Activity 5: Monkey Bread (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 26; M 2, 8, 10, 11; SCI 3, 7)

 

Materials List: one can of refrigerator biscuits for every 10 students, cinnamon sugar mixture, ½ cup of margarine (melted), cupcake liners, muffin tins, clean scissors, 2 small bowls, oven

 

Always check for any food allergies before any cooking activity.

 

Teacher preparation: Preheat oven to the temperature specified on the biscuit cans. Put the melted margarine in one bowl and the cinnamon sugar mixture in the other bowl. Clean a pair of student scissors. Put cupcake liners into the muffin tins (one per student).

 

Have students wash hands before coming to the center. Talk about how monkeys eat by using their fingers to pick things apart and eating it with their fingers. Tell students they are going to make their own Monkey Bread snack. Help each student use the scissors to cut their biscuit into 4 smaller pieces. The student will roll each piece of dough into a ball, drop each ball into the margarine, sprinkle the balls with cinnamon sugar, and put all 4 balls into one of the cupcake liners in the muffin tin.

 

After each student has made his/her Monkey Bread, take the muffin tins to the oven and bake for 8 – 10 minutes or until golden brown. Let cool then students may eat their Monkey Bread.

 

Accommodations: Assist students with cutting and rolling the dough into the correct size and shape.

 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

·    Small Group Activity 1: RAFT Zoo Signs

 

·    Small Group Activity 4: Counting Zoo Animals

 

 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

 

Baker, Keith. Who Is the Beast?. ISBN 978-0152001223

Bullock, Linda. Living On the Savannah. ISBN 978-0516273273

Cannon, Janell. Stellaluna ISBN 0-15-280217-7

Cannon, Janell. Verdi. ISBN 978-3551514974

Capucilla, Alyssa. Inside a Zoo in the City. ISBN 0-439-22317-2

Cherry, Lynne. The Great Kapok Tree. ISBN 0-15-202614-2

Christelow, Eileen. Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed. ISBN 978-0618836826

DK Publishing. Elephant (Watch Me Grow). ISBN 978-0756611552

DK Publishing. Zoo Animals. ISBN 0-689-71406-8

DuQuette, Keith. Little Monkey Lost. ISBN 978-0399242946

Fraser, Mary Ann. Where Are the Night Animals? ISBN 978-0064451765

Fox, Mem. Zoo Looking. ISBN 0-590-29901-8

Gelman, Rita. I Went to the Zoo. ISBN 0-590-45883-3

Gibbons, Gail. Zoo. ISBN 978-0874992106

Jorgensen, Gail. Crocodile Beat. ISBN 0-590-22659-2

Krebs, Laurie. We All Went On A Safari. ISBN 0-439-63826-7

Liebman, Dan. I Want to be a Zookeeper. ISBN 1-55297-697-1

Lopshire, Robert. Put Me in the Zoo. ISBN 0-375-87520-4

Martin, Jr., Bill. The Happy Hippopotami. ISBN 978-0152333829

Martin, Jr., Bill. Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? ISBN 0-590-45409-9

Martin, Jr., Bill. Brown Bear, Brown Bear What Do You See? ISBN 978-0805047905

Paxton, Tom. Going to the Zoo. ISBN 978-0688138004

Riley, Linda. Elephants Swim. ISBN 0-395-93489-3

Rockwell, Anne. Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? ISBN 978-0064452007

Schwartz, David. At the Zoo. ISBN 1-57471-217-9

Slater, Teddy. Stay in Line. ISBN 0-590-22713-0

Stimson, Joan. Swim Polar Bear, Swim! ISBN 0-590-59601-2

Thomas, Isabel. Lion Vs. Tiger. ISBN 978-1410923981

 

Cds/Recordings

 

Dr. Jean Feldman. Dr. Jean and Friends

Dr. Jean Feldman. Sings Silly Songs

Greg and Steve, Kids In Motion

Jack Hartman, Rhyming to Read

Johnette Downing, Wild and Wooley Wiggle Songs

Raffi. Singable Songs for the Very Young

 


Unit 4-3:  Animal Habitats

Study Focus:  Zoo (week 2 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to introduce students to the purposes of zoos, the jobs of zoo keepers, and the animals that often live in zoos.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that animals live in zoos and people visit zoos. Students will understand that zoo keepers take care of the animals in the zoo.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students identify a zoo environment?
  2. Can students identify what happens in zoos?
  3. Can students identify different varieties of zoo animals?
  4. Can students identify the characteristics of zoo animals?

Guiding Vocabulary: zoo, zookeeper, habitat, cages, reptile, amphibian, mammal, bird, nocturnal, wild, endangered, diet, carnivore, herbivore, and omnivore, observer, biologist, veterinarian

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)


 

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)


 

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Zebras and Giraffes

Reptiles and Amphibians

Going on a Bear Hunt

Nocturnal Animals

Animal Habitat Sort

Whole Group Activities

Living on the Savannah by Linda Bullock

Graphic Organizer

ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 5d, 6, 9, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 29, 31, SCI 22

Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? By Anne Rockwell

ELA 4, 5a, 6, 9, 12b; SCI 22

Graphing:

What kind of bear would you hunt?

ELA 21, 24, 27, 28, M 10, 12, 13 SCI 15

Where are the Night Animals? By Mary Ann Fraser

ELA 9, M 7, SCI 22

Word Grid

 

ELA 21, 24, 29, SCI 5, 9

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27;  SS 4, 5, 7

Do you like zebras?

Do you like snakes?

Do you like bears?

Do you like bats?

Would you like to live in the zoo?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography.  

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

We All Went on a Safari by Laurie Krebs

 

 

Verdi by Janell Cannon

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?

By Eric Carle

Stellaluna by Janell Cannon

Put Me in the Zoo by Robert Lopshire

Small Group Activities

AB patterns:

Animal stripes

ELA 24, M 13

Learning Log:

___ lives in an alligator hole.

ELA 3a, 3b, 11, 19, 24, SCI 22

Bear Claw snacks

ELA 24, SCI 3, 7, 18, 21

Torn paper bats

ELA 23, 24, M 7, 10, 11

Animal Habitat sort

Professor KIA

M 9, SCI 1, 20, 22

Music and Movement

zebra dancing (black and white ribbons)

Going on a Bear Hunt song/chant

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

zoo docents (volunteers)  visit the school; Zoo field trip (use the BLM zoo animal checklist: duplicate for each student, put them on clipboards and provide crayons for students to check off each animal as they find them at the zoo)


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Use strawberry baskets for cages, small plastic zoo animals, spinner or die and tickets.  Have students spin spinner and put the correct number of tickets in front of each animal cage for admission to that exhibit.

Measurement

Use different size zoo animals such as giraffes and compare the length of their necks.

Geometry

Paper plate, scissors, and geometric shapes.  Cut paper plate in a 1” spiral.  Have students identify shapes as they glue them onto their snake.

Data Collection

BLM Graph:

What is your favorite zoo animal?

Patterning

Trace the outline of a zebra and cut out, marble or small rubber ball, black paint, and magnifying glass.  Let children marble paint zebras then examine to see if any stripe patterns are alike using magnifying glasses.

Science

SCI 1,2,3,4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11

SS 4

learning logs and  writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

wild animal puzzles

wild animal memory game

check with local pet stores or snake owners to obtain a snake skin for students to observe

feathers for observation

 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

feed the animals bean bag toss: tape pictures of animals to shoe boxes, then have students “feed” the animals by tossing bean bags into the boxes

move like the animals: create cards with pictures of animals; have students take turns drawing a card and moving like that animal

monkey see, monkey do: students take turns making movements, and the rest of the group has to copy the movement

 


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

wild animals and items to create animal habitats such as blue and green felt for water and grass, plastic trees, and decorative rocks

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 3

SCI 9

SS 4

wild animal counters and counting mats - have students use a die or spinner to determine the number of animals to place on the counting mat, or label each counting mat with a numeral 1 – 10 and have students count out the corresponding number on the mat

strawberry baskets for sorting and counting animal counters (use die, spinner or numeral cards to determine number)

wild animal puzzle

wild animal matching

wild animal patterning

 

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://pbskids.org/mamamirabelle/funstuff_friends.html

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/animal-adventure/index.html

http://www.hoglezoo.org/kids/

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/animal-adventure/games/game_animal_spot.html

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

animal print fabric and paper, wiggle eyes, Easter grass, twigs, string, yarn, etc. for zoo collages

box sculpture animals

paper plate lions

animal sponge prints

 

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

zoo animals that live on land

small trees and jeeps

 

Water:

zoo animals that live in water

 

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Going to the Zoo - Raffi

Zebras, Monkey See Monkey Do, Dark in the Jungle, Wild and Wooley - Johnette Downing:

Monkeys and the Alligator, Tarzan, Elephant Song, The Cool Bear Hunt, The Alligator Chant – Dr. Jean

Animal Action - Greg and Steve

3 Elephants – Jack Hartman


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

small stuffed animals and boxes for students to create a zoo

zookeeper props such as khaki colored caps or safari hats

clipboards and pencils

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

 

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as: pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers

zoo animal word cards: take pictures of wild animals (clip art, magazine pictures, photos) and put them on strips of card stock, print the name of the animal on the card next to or above the picture and laminate for durability.

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Zebras and Giraffes (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 5d, 6, 9, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 29, 31; SCI 22)

 

Materials List: Living on the Savannah (book) by Linda Bullock, comparison graphic organizer such as a Venn diagram drawn on chart paper using 2 different colored markers, pictures of zebras and giraffes, Zebras (song) from Wild and Woolly Wiggle Songs by Johnette Downing

 

Open with Zebras from Wild and Wooley Wiggle Songs by Johnette Downing

 

Display the book, Living on the Savannah, pointing to the title as it is read aloud. Ask students what they think this story may be about. Discuss the illustrations and how the text tells the story while the illustrations are the pictures. Read the book, being sure to point to the text as it’s read and pausing where appropriate to allow for comments and questions. Display the pictures of the zebras and giraffes and lead a brief discussion of each animals’ characteristics: physical descriptions, diet, names of the young, etc.

 

Lead students in completing a graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions) in the form of a Venn diagram comparing zebras and giraffes.

 

Review the completed Venn diagram and close with Zebras song.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Reptiles and Amphibians (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 6, 9, 12b; SCI 22)

 

Materials List: Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? (book) by Anne Rockwell; pictures/posters of amphibians such as frogs, toads, and salamanders; pictures/posters of reptiles such as alligators, crocodiles, turtles, lizards, etc.

 

Open with the following poem:

                        If you should meet a crocodile,

                        Don’t take a stick and poke him.

                        Ignore the welcome of his smile,

                        Be careful not to stroke him,

                        For as he sleeps upon the Nile,

                        He gets thinner and thinner.

                        And whenever you meet a crocodile,

                        He’s looking for his dinner.

 

Display the book, Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? Read the title and ask students what they believe the story will be about. Read the book, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions. Display pictures/posters of amphibians and reptiles. Discuss the different animals: habitats, diet, habits, etc.

 

Close with the opening poem.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: Going on a Bear Hunt (GLEs: ELA 21, 24, 27, 28; M 10, 12, 13; SCI 15)

 

Materials List: Music CD Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs by Jean Feldman; pictures or plastic figurines of various kinds of bears (possible choices of bears may include grizzly, black, and polar); What Kind of Bear Would You Hunt? BLM, Bear Hunt BLM graph response sheet

 

Tell students that today our class will go on a pretend bear hunt. Tell them there are several kinds of bears that might be found on a bear hunt. Display the pictures or figurines of bears and briefly discuss with students facts about the bears: name, habitat, diet, etc.

 

Lead the class in singing/acting out The Cool Bear Hunt from Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs. After the song, ask students to respond to the graph question: What Kind of Bear Would You Hunt?

 

 


 

Whole Group Activity 4: Nocturnal Animals (GLEs: ELA 9; M 7; SCI 22)

 

Materials List: Where are the Night Animals? by Mary Ann Fraser (book); pictures/figurines of nocturnal animals such as bats, raccoons, opossums, owls, etc.

 

Open with the following poem:

                        There was a little boy went into a barn

                        And lay down on some hay.

                        An owl came out and flew about,

                        And the little boy ran away.

 

Read book, pausing for questions and comments where appropriate. Display and discuss pictures/figurines of nocturnal animals.

 

Close with the opening poem.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5: Animal Habitats (GLEs: ELA 21, 24, 29; SCI 5, 9)

 

Materials List: Singable Songs CD by Raffi; pictures of the following habitats: desert, jungle, grass lands, polar, and forest; word grid poster featuring the listed habitats; pictures of animals (should be at least one from each habitat)

 

Open with Going to the Zoo song from Singable Songs by Raffi

 

Discuss the different habitats and animals that have been covered during the previous 2 weeks. Refer to the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) showing the different habitats listed across the top and the animals down the side of the word grid. Guide students as they determine which habitats each animal lives in and mark the word grid accordingly.


 

 

Desert

Jungle

Grass lands

River or lake

Polar

Forest

Lizard 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tiger

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lion 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bear

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deer 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giraffe            

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monkey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frog       

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owl       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review the word grid and allow time for students to discuss/add any other animals they wish. Place word grid in an accessible area with additional animal pictures so students can continue to sort and classify animals by habitat.

 

Close with Going to the Zoo song.

 

Small Group Activities

 

Small Group Activity 1: AB patterns: Animal stripes (GLEs: ELA 24; M 13)

 

Materials List: black and orange finger paint, finger paint paper (optional: cut paper into large tiger shapes); smocks; pictures of real tigers

 

Explain that the tigers’ stripes help them hide and sneak up on their prey as they are hunting for food in the jungle. Have students put on paint smocks to protect clothing. Display tiger pictures and explain that they are to paint black and orange stripes with the finger paint. As students are painting, encourage them to notice that the stripes are in a pattern of black, orange, black, orange.  After the paintings have dried, use them to create a display of student art work.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 2: Learning Log: ____ lives in an alligator hole.  (GLEs: ELA 3a, 3b, 11, 19, 24; SCI 22)

 

Materials List: Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? (book), blank paper, crayons/colored pencils/markers

 

Display and remind students of the story read at whole group time, Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? Give students a piece of blank paper and ask each to write his/her name. Ask students to draw a picture of what they remember lives in alligator holes and to orally describe what they drew on the learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions) page and write their responses in the blank provided on the page. Bind the pages together to create a class book. After sharing the class book with the class, place the completed book in the library or science center.

 

Accommodations: Encourage students who are hesitant or unsure of their drawing/writing skills. Provide pictures or the book illustrations to assist students who can’t remember the animals in the story.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 3: Bear Claw Snacks (GLEs: ELA 24; SCI 3, 7, 18, 21, )

 

Materials List: canned biscuit dough (one biscuit per student); cinnamon sugar mixture in a bowl or shaker, melted margarine, pastry brush, cookie sheet; aluminum foil cut into approximately 5 inch squares (one per student); permanent marker

 

Check for potential allergy problems before doing this activity.  Have each student wash his/her hands before coming to the center.

 

Explain that they are going to make a bear claw snack today. Give each student a piece of aluminum foil with his/her name written in permanent marker on it. Put a canned biscuit in the center of the foil square and have each student press his/her fist into the biscuit making a paw print-like impression. Have each child use the pastry brush to brush his/her bear claw with melted butter. Then have each child sprinkle his/her bear claw with cinnamon sugar. Bake according to directions on the biscuit cans. Serve baked bear claws as a snack.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4: Torn Paper Bats (GLEs: ELA 23, 24; M 7, 10, 11)

 

Materials List: 9x12 inch black and brown constructions paper; Bat Pattern BLM; glue; scissors; pictures of real bats

 

Duplicate the Bat Pattern BLM for each student. Cut black and brown construction paper into half sheets.

 

Display bat pictures and allow each student to choose a color for his/her bat. Have students tear construction paper into small pieces then glue the pieces to the Bat Pattern BLM. After students have covered their bat with torn paper, let them dry. Later students may use scissors to cut out their bat.

 

 

Small Group Activity 5: Animal Habitat Sort (GLEs: M 9; SCI 1, 20, 22)

 

Materials List: Pictures of the following habitats: desert, jungle, grass lands, polar, and forest; 5 boxes/baskets or trays (one per habitat); pictures or figurines of animals from each of the 5 habitats

 

Attach habitat pictures to the outside of the boxes/baskets or place them in the trays. Have students take turns being professor know-it-all (view literacy strategy descriptions) and sort the animal pictures or figurines according to the habitats they live in. Observe and discuss with students why animals live in certain habitats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sample Assessments

 

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

·         Small Group Activity 2: Learning Log pages

 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

 

Baker, Keith. Who Is the Beast?. ISBN 978-0152001223

Bullock, Linda. Living On the Savannah. ISBN 978-0516273273

Cannon, Janell. Stellaluna ISBN 0-15-280217-7

Cannon, Janell. Verdi. ISBN 978-3551514974

Capucilla, Alyssa. Inside a Zoo in the City. ISBN 0-439-22317-2

Cherry, Lynne. The Great Kapok Tree. ISBN 0-15-202614-2

Christelow, Eileen. Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed. ISBN 978-0618836826

DK Publishing. Elephant (Watch Me Grow). ISBN 978-0756611552

DK Publishing. Zoo Animals. ISBN 0-689-71406-8

DuQuette, Keith. Little Monkey Lost. ISBN 978-0399242946

Fraser, Mary Ann. Where Are the Night Animals? ISBN 978-0064451765

Fox, Mem. Zoo Looking. ISBN 0-590-29901-8

Gelman, Rita. I Went to the Zoo. ISBN 0-590-45883-3

Gibbons, Gail. Zoo. ISBN 978-0874992106

Jorgensen, Gail. Crocodile Beat. ISBN 0-590-22659-2

Krebs, Laurie. We All Went On A Safari. ISBN 0-439-63826-7

Liebman, Dan. I Want to be a Zookeeper. ISBN 1-55297-697-1

Lopshire, Robert. Put Me in the Zoo. ISBN 0-375-87520-4

Martin, Jr., Bill. The Happy Hippopotami. ISBN 978-0152333829

Martin, Jr., Bill. Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? ISBN 0-590-45409-9

Martin, Jr., Bill. Brown Bear, Brown Bear What Do You See? ISBN 978-0805047905

Paxton, Tom. Going to the Zoo. ISBN 978-0688138004

Riley, Linda. Elephants Swim. ISBN 0-395-93489-3

Rockwell, Anne. Who Lives in an Alligator Hole? ISBN 978-0064452007

Schwartz, David. At the Zoo. ISBN 1-57471-217-9

Slater, Teddy. Stay in Line. ISBN 0-590-22713-0

Stimson, Joan. Swim Polar Bear, Swim! ISBN 0-590-59601-2

Thomas, Isabel. Lion Vs. Tiger. ISBN 978-1410923981

 

 

CDs/Recordings

 

Dr. Jean Feldman. Dr. Jean and Friends

Dr. Jean Feldman. Sings Silly Songs

Greg and Steve, Kids In Motion

Jack Hartman, Rhyming to Read

Johnette Downing, Wild and Wooley Wiggle Songs

Raffi. Singable Songs for the Very Young