Unit 8-1:  Community

Study Focus:  Transportation (week 2 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to explore the various forms of transportation and the concept of travel.

Student Understandings: Students will understand the meaning of transportation. Students will understand that people travel in different ways. Students will understand that transportation occurs via land, water, and air.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students identify transportation as a way to move from one place to another?
  2. Can students understand that transportation methods vary according to where people live?
  3. Can students recognize an array of transportation vehicles?
  4. Can students select forms of transportation according to the method of travel? (examples- air travel – airplane, hot air balloon; water travel – boat, ship, sailboat; land travel – bus, car, train, bike)

Guiding Vocabulary: transportation, travel, land, water, air, vehicle, map, far, near, vacation, destination, airport, train station, engine, motor, port, dock, transportation modes, such as car, bus, taxi, train, bicycle, boat, ship, airplane, helicopter, etc.

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)


 

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)


 

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)


 

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Ships

Boats

Airplanes

Airports

Going on a Trip

Whole Group Activities

Big City Port 

ELA 8, 9, 11, 14c, 16, 18, 22

The Boat Game

ELA 8, 9, 11, 16, 18, 22, 27; M 10, 13; SS 2

Going on a Trip

ELA 8, 9, 10,14c, 21, 24, 27; M 13; SS 2

If I Could Fly Chart

ELA 8, 9, 10, 14c, 16, 18, 20, 21; M 1; SS 2

Traveling We Will Go

ELA 18, 22, 27, 31; M 13

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you seen a ship?

Have you ridden on a boat?

Have you seen an airplane?

 

Have you ever been to the airport?

Do you have a suitcase?

Storytime

Suggested

alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography

ELA 1a, 1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

The Boat Book

Who Sank the Boat?

Airport

Flying

This is the Way We Go to School

Small Group Activities

Tug Boat Puffs

ELA 3b, 4, 9, 14c; SCI 2, 3

Floating/Sinking Activity

ELA 16;

SCI 2, 3, 6, 10

Patterning Activity

ELA 24; M 11

Airplanes and  Clouds

ELA 14c, 24; M 10, 11

Word Grid

ELA 22, 31

Music and Movement

Horns and bells

 Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Field trip to the airport, field trip to a lake, river, or pond

Invite a boat owner or a boat captain to school


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Construction paper, marker, small cars from block area and masking tape.  Divide paper up with marker like the floor of a parking garage and number each space.  Put corresponding numbers on each car with masking tape and have students drive the cars through the parking garage, parking each car in its correct space.

 

Measurement

Using small plastic boats in the water table or tub, have students push the boats across the water and identify which boat stayed near and which boat moved far away from them.

Geometry

Have students identify different shapes on vehicles from the block center. Ex:  round tire

Data Collection

Wheel Graph BLM

Patterning

Use plastic or wooden thread spools that are shaped like wheels.  Have students dip them in different colors of paint and create wheel patterns.


 

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

feely box with car/truck keys inside

license plates to feel and observe the letters and numbers

maps

horns

a variety of different sizes of cars and trucks with wheels of different sizes and types

brochures of cars/trucks

balance scale for weighing cars and trucks

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

car/truck/bicycle races

bicycle obstacle course

red light/green light game

airplane game or motorboat game using directional hand signals: up, down, left, right, high, low, stop, and go

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10,

11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

atlas, maps, car wash implements, gas station logo signs, long boards/blocks for roadways, paper roadways, plastic garages, roadways, road rugs, a variety of transportation vehicles, blue bodies of water (created from paper or fabric), boats, airport names and photos, space stations, cotton batting for clouds, stop and go signs, local river, lake, or bayou names

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9,10,11,13

SCI 9

SS 4

matching games using road signs created from clipart, boardmaker, or cutouts; gas station or oil company logos matching game; teacher-made license plate matching game (e.g.,. LBG 123 to LBG 123); rubber or plastic vehicle manipulatives to be used for patterning, sorting, or classifying

airplane to cloud number game (Cut out a cloud shape out of a piece of paper. Write the numerals 1-10 on clouds. Place the corresponding number of airplanes on each cloud.)

transportation lotto or bingo - create a transportation or vehicle bingo or lotto game using boardmaker, diecuts, stickers, or clipart

small plastic airplanes and boats for sorting, pattering, or graphing

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/space/index.html

http://www.chevroncars.com/games/

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

license plate rubbings, different-sized wheels from toy cars and trucks which are to be rolled in paint then on paper, water colors, ship cookie cutter prints on blue painted “water,” train tracks made with popsicle sticks and a train stamped on the track, transportation stickers and stamps or pictures cut from travel brochures, clipart, or travel magazines for collage, boat and airplane stencils and stamps, cotton ball prints with white paint for clouds

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

cars and trucks in wet sand, dump trucks, road signs, popsicle sticks for train tracks

 

 

Water:

boats, sailboats, funnels, sponges, plastic cars, spray bottles, pieces of wood for floating, sailboats and rocks/marbles for displacement investigating

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Riding in my Car, Bicycle Built for Two, Little Red Wagon - Raffi;

Bike - Johnette Downing; Chug a Lugg a Choo Choo - Gregg and Steve

Helicopter, Sail Away Sailboat, I’m a Little Airplane - High Reach Learning

Row, Row, Row Your Boat, I Saw Three Ships by Countdown Kids; A Sailor Went to Sea - Dr. Jean

The Silly Pirate Song - Jack Hartmann

Riding in an Airplane -Raffi

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

Transportation Prop Box: cars and trucks, car wash bucket, sponges, rags, soap bottle, maps, steering wheel, car magazines, funnel, hose, cash register, money, hat, uniform, gas pump, small plastic (unused) gasoline container

Travel Prop Box: travel destination brochures (obtained from hotel lobbies or state rest area welcome stations or a travel agency), head set, pilot hat/suit, steering wheel, seats, blankets, travel bag and/or suitcase, airplane, tickets, money, paper credit cards, clothes

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

Atlas, maps, travel destination brochures, destination word cards, car ads from the newspaper

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools, such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

car, truck, and bus stamps, stencils, word cars; auto magazines; maps; gas station logos; car ads from newspaper, travel brochures, destination cards—mountains, ocean, Walt Disney World, New York City, beach, etc.

 

 


 

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Big City Port (GLEs: ELA 8, 9, 11, 14c, 16, 18, 22)

 

Materials List: Big City Port (book), chart paper, markers, picture of a port

 

Read the book and discuss the ships and activities associated with a big city port.  Create a graphic organizer  (view literacy strategy descriptions) by writing “Big City Port” in the middle of the large chart paper and include a picture of a port.  Ask students to give you examples of ships or activities that occur in a big city port and record student responses on the chart.   Refer to book when needed.  Post the chart paper in a place where students can refer back to it.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2:  The Boat Game (GLEs: ELA 8, 9, 11, 16, 18, 22, 27; M 10, 13; SS 2)

 

Materials List:  Ships and Boats (book), chart paper, markers, large pictures labeled with the names of each - boat, sailboat, canoe, motorboat, tugboat, fishing boat, and a ship for students to hold as the song is sung

 

Read the book and discuss the variety of boats and ships as well as the manner in which they are powered (e.g., sails, people, engines).  Make a list of responses on the chart paper.  Say “We’re going to learn a boat song.  We’re also going to use the names of the boats and ships that you have named.” Distribute pictures with the words labeled (see material list) to students to hold up as the verse is sung. Sing the following song enough times for each student to have a turn to hold a picture card.  While you sing, make the sounds associated with each task and move your hands and arms to demonstrate the movements indicated:  

 

(tune of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat”)

 

Row, Row, Row your boat gently down the stream,

Merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.

 

Sail, Sail, Sail your sail boat slowly on the lake,

Merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.

 

Paddle, paddle, paddle your canoe quickly down the bayou,

Merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.

 

Zoom, zoom, zoom in your motor boat quickly across the lake,

Merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.

 

Push, push, push goes the tugboat all around the river,

Merrily, merrily, merrily life is but a dream.

 

Fish, fish, fish on your fishing boat all around the marsh,

Merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.

 

Cut, cut, cut speeds the ship through the ocean deep,

Merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3:  Going on a Trip (GLEs: ELA 8, 9, 10, 14c, 21, 24, 27; M 13; SS 2)

 

Materials List:  Going on an Airplane (book), a suitcase with items to be taken on a trip (e.g., toothbrush/toothpaste, shoes, clothing)

 

Read the book and discuss traveling on an airplane, the preparation needed to travel, and the items needed for the trip.  Show the students the suitcase and display the items that you have packed.  Teach the following song to the tune of Row, Row, Row Your Boat:

 

Pack, pack, pack your bag

Pack your bag today.

Whatcha gonna pack inside

Before you fly away? 

 

Insert student’s name three times (e.g., Sally, Sally, Sally)

Watcha gonna pack?

 

Student Response:

I’m gonna pack my insert item  (e.g., toothbrush)

Before I fly away.

 

 

 

Repeat prompt and response until all students have had an opportunity to respond.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4:  If I Could Fly Chart   (GLEs: ELA 8, 9, 10, 14c, 16, 18, 20, 21; M 1; SS 2)

 

Materials List: First Flight (book), pictures of an airplane, space shuttle, hot air balloon, helicopter, jet

 

Read the book and discuss the concept of flying with the students and that people use air transportation to travel to places faster than by other ways of transportation. Ask the students to generate a list of other types of air transportation. Have the photographs of the other methods ready to show as the list is generated. Use the following rhyme with the students:

 

Up, up and away.

How will you fly away today?

 

Call on individual students to choose a picture of a mode of air transportation with the following response:

 

Up, up and away.

___________ (student’s name) will take

a(an) _________________ (jet, airplane, etc.) today.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5:  Traveling We Will Go (GLEs: ELA 18, 22, 27, 31; M 13)

 

Materials List:  cut-outs or photographs of airplanes, boats, bicycle, car, truck, bus, train; chart paper, markers

 

Briefly review land, sea, and air transportation.  Refer to previously taught lessons if needed. Write land, sea, and air with corresponding pictures on columns on the chart paper.  Have students identify as many modes of transportation as they can.  Categorize the various modes of transportation within the appropriate column on the chart.  When the chart is complete, place cut-outs or photographs of the various modes of transportation in the middle of the circle rug.  Teach the students the following song to the tune of “Farmer in the Dell”:

 


 

A travelling I will go,

A travelling I will go,

Hi, ho the derry-o,

A travelling I will go.

 

____________ (student’s name) will go by ______________ (mode of transportation)

____________ will go by ____________

Hi, ho the derry-o,

____________ will go by ____________.

 

Once the song has been learned, have each student stand in the front of the class holding the cut-out/photo of their choice.  The class will then sing the song together using the chosen student’s name and mode of transportation.  Repeat until all students have had the opportunity to participate. 

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activities

 

 

Small Group Activity 1:  Tugboat Puffs    (GLEs: ELA 3b, 4, 9, 14c; SCI 2, 3)

 

Materials List:  Little Toot (book), 26 cut-outs of a tugboat with an upper and lower case letter written on the boat (e.g., Aa, Bb), 26 cut-outs of white puffs of smoke with an upper an lower case letter written on the puff (e.g., Aa, Bb), dry erase board, dry erase markers

 

Read the book, pausing to discuss tugboats and the manner in which they operate on a river. Discuss the manner is which tugboats push and pull other ships on rivers and harbors. Discuss the manner in which the smoke comes out of the chimney of the boat.  This is referred to as a ‘puff’ of smoke.  Introduce the matching game called “Tugboat Puffs”.  Display the boats and the puffs in the circle area.  Instruct the students that they will take turns matching the alphabet letters written on the puffs with the same alphabet letters written on the boats. Continue around the circle until all students have had a turn and when all letters have been matched. Allow the students to write a letter of their choice on the dry erase board.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who are unable to find a match, and/or limit the number of tugboats and puffs according to the students’ abilities.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity #2:  Floating and Sinking Activity (GLEs: ELA 16, SCI 2, 3, 6, 10)

 

Materials List:  a large plastic bowl filled ¾ with water, a cork, a shirt button, a piece of Styrofoam, a pencil, a rock, a piece of paper, a paper clip, a feather, a piece of wood, a popsicle stick, chart paper, markers

 

Discuss the concepts of sinking and floating with the students.  Write the two concepts, Sink and Float, on the chart at the top. Display the items listed above in the circle area.  Have the students predict which items will sink and which will float.  Place each item on the chart under the column as the students have predicted.  Then place each item in the water, one at a time to see which sink and which float.  Check the chart to see

how well the students predicted.  Make corrections on the chart as needed.  Conclude by asking the students to name other items and predict whether they would sink or float.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 3:  Patterning Activity (GLEs: ELA 24; M 11)

 

Materials List:  airplane cut-outs or rubber counting airplanes, a bag of cotton balls, crayons, strips of paper for each student

 

Discuss AB patterns.  Show the students a physical pattern using a boy-girl’ pattern as an example of AB patterning.  Allow the students to manipulate the airplanes and the cotton balls.  When they have finished, tell the students that they  will now create an AB pattern using the airplanes and the cotton balls.  As an extension of this activity, give each student two crayons of their choice and a strip of paper.  Using these tools, the students will make their own AB patterns using the two colors of the crayons and drawing circles to represent clouds.  Encourage the students to share their work with their classmates, one at a time.  Allow each student the opportunity to discuss their work.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who do not understand AB patterns.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4:  Airplanes and Clouds (GLEs: ELA 14c, 24; M 10, 11)

 

Materials List:  The Little Book of Planes (book), rubber counting airplanes or airplane cut-outs for each student, cotton batting cut in the shape of a cloud with a slit in the middle for each student, markers, paper, crayons

 

Read the book to the students and discuss how planes are able to fly into the sky, into the clouds.  Have each student hold their own cloud and their own plane.  Instruct them to follow your positional commands, e.g., pass the plane through the cloud, around the cloud, over the cloud, under the cloud, next to the cloud, above the cloud.  Once all of the positional commands have been completed, allow each student to demonstrate each

 

of the commands in front of the class.  Then, distribute markers, crayons, and paper to each student and instruct them to draw an airplane and cloud depicting one of the positional commands.  Compile the students’ work that identifies the positional commands into a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions).  Place the learning log journal in the science center.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 5:  Word Grid (GLEs: ELA 22, 31)

 

Materials List:  word grid chart, markers

 

Review the concepts used throughout the Transportation Unit.  Discuss the various forms of transportation; e.g., car, truck, airplane, bike, sailboat, ship, train, tugboat and the concepts that accompany the previous activities, e.g., cars and motors, airplanes with wings, boats and ships on the water, trains on a track, bikes on the road.  Show the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) to the students and encourage the students to assist with the completion of the word grid by placing either a Y for yes or an N for no to indicate appropriate matching of mode of transportation to descriptors.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty remembering modes of transportation and their associated characteristics.

 

 

 Wheels

 

Wings

 

Motor

2 Doors

 

Track

 

Water

 

 

Car

 

 

 

 

 

 

Truck

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Airplane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bike

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sailboat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ship

 

 

 

 

 

 

Train

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tugboat

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Y = yes        N = no    or you can put a happy/sad face

 

 

 

Sample Assessments

 

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Small Group Activity 4:  The teacher will observe and document the students’ responses to the learning log journal.

·         Small Group Activity 5:  The teacher will observe and document the students’ response to the word grid.

 

 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

 

Allen, Pamela.  Who Sank the Boat?, ISBN:  0-440-84438-X

Baer, Edith.  This is the Way We Go to School, ISBN: 0-590-43162-5

Barbot, Daniel.  A Bicycle for Rosaura, ISBN: 0-395-78158-2

Barton, Byron.  Airport, ISBN: 0-06-443145-2

Benjamin, Cynthia.  I Am a Pilot, ISBN: 0-8120-6407-0

Berenstain, Stan and Jan.  Bears on Wheels, ISBN: 0-394-90967-4

Berenstain, Stan and Jan.  The Berenstain Bears and the Big Road Race, ISBN: 0-394-89134-1


 

Berger, Samantha and Pamela Chanko.  The Boat Book, ISBN: 0-439-08125-4

Boyd, Patti.  Oh, So Noisy!, ISBN:  0-448-40538-5

Bridwell, Norman.  Clifford Takes a Trip, ISBN: 0-590-44260-0

Brown, Janet Allison. Vehicles: A First Vehicles Book, ISBN: 1-40545-361-3

Brown, Margaret Wise.  Red Light, Green Light, ISBN: 0-590-44558-8

Bruna, Dick.  Miffy Goes Flying, ISBN: 0-8431-1535-1

Burton, Virginia Lee.  Choo Choo: The Runaway Engine, ISBN: 590-04436-2

Burton, Virginia Lee.  Choo Choo:  The Story of a Little Engine Who Ran Away, ISBN: 0-395-17684-0

Calmenson, Stephanie.  Engine, Engine, Number Nine, ISBN: 0-590-26820-1

Calmenson, Stephanie.  Roller Skates!, ISBN: 0-590-45716-0

Cammell, Sandra.  Row Your Boat, ISBN: 0-7901-0580-2

Canizares, Susan and Daniel Moreton.  Wheels, ISBN: 0-439-08123-8

Chewning, Randy.  You Can Name 100 Trucks, ISBN: 0-590-46302-0

Cobb, Annie.  Wheels!, ISBN: 0-679-86445-8

Conrad, Lynn.  All Aboard Trucks, ISBN: 0-448-19094-X

Cowley, Joy.  To Town,  ISBN: 1-55911-262-X

Crampton, Gertrude.  Scuffy The Tugboat, ISBN: 0-307-02046-0

Crews, Donald.  Flying, ISBN: 0-590-46364-0

Crews, Donald.  Sail Away, ISBN: 0-590-85911-0

Crews, Donald.  Truck, ISBN: 0-673-81693-1

Crews, Donald.  Freight Train, ISBN: 0-590-42694-X

Crews, Donald.  School Bus, ISBN: -590-44153-1

Crews, Donald.  Harbor, ISBN: 0-688-00861-5

Cutting, Jillian.  The School Bus, ISBN: 0-7802-6408-8

Delgado, Eduard and Francesc Rovira.  Alex’s Adventures at the Harbor, ISBN: 0-517-60673-9

Disney.  Things that Go, ISBN: 0-5008-60149-4

Dodds, Dayle Ann.  Wheel Away!, ISBN: 0-590-43831-X

Fowler, Richard. Mr. Little’s Noisy Car, ISBN: 0-448-18977-1

Gibbons, Gail. Bicycle Book, ISBN: 13-978-0-8234-1408-6

Graham, Margaret Bloy.  Benjy’s Boat Trip, ISBN: 0-06-022092-9

Gramatky, Hardie.  Little Toot, ISBN: 0-448-34301-0

Hooker, Yvonne.  Wheels Go Round, ISBN: 0-448-21030-4

Johnston, Faith.  Lion’s Limousine, ISBN: 0-7327-1953-4

Kingsland, Robin.  Bus Stop Bop, ISBN: 0-670-83919-1


 

Kovalski, Maryann.  The Wheels On the Bus, ISBN: 0-440-84409-6

Lippman, Peter.  Busy Trains, ISBN: 0-394-83747-9

Maestro, Betsy and Ellen DelVecchio.  Big City Port, ISBN: 0-590-41577-8

Mathieu, Joe.  Big Joe’s Trailer Truck, ISBN: 0-394-82925-5

McNaught, Harry.  The Truck Book, ISBN: 0-394-83621-9

McNeil, Florence and David McPhail.  Sail Away, ISBN: 1-55143-147-5

McPhail, David.  First Flight, ISBN: 0-316-56332-3

Merriam, Eve.  Train Leaves the Station, ISBN: 0-440-84939-X

Mitton, Tony and Ant Parker.  Terrific Trains, ISBN: 0-439-25420-5

Morris, Ann.  On the Go, ISBNN: 0-590-45995-3

Muntean, Michaela.  The Very Bumpy Bus Ride, ISBN: 0-8193-1079-4

Muntean, Michaela.  Bicycle Bear Rides Again, ISBN: 0-8193-1193-6

Murphy, Stuart J., Beep Beep, Vroom Vroom! ISBN: 0-06-446728-7

Neitzel, Shirley.  I’m Taking a Trip on My Train, ISBN: 0-439-16487-7

Piper, Watty.  The Little Engine That Could, ISBN: 0-448-40520-2

Potter, marian.  The Little Red Caboose.

Priddy Books.  My Big Train Book, ISBN: 0-312-49186-7

Rey, Margret and H.A.  Curious George Takes a Train, ISBN: 0-618-06567-9

Rey, H.A.  Curious George Rides a Bike, ISBN: 0-395-16964-X

Rockwell, Anne.  Cars, ISBN: 0-8085-7279-2

Rogers, Fred.  Going on an Airplane, ISBN: 0-399-21633-2

Royston, Angela.  Ships and Boats, ISBN: 0-689-71566-8

Royston, Angela.  Diggers and DumpTrucks, ISBN: 0-689-71516-1

Scarry, Richard.  Things That Go, ISBN: 0-307-11817-7

Shaw, Nancy.  Sheep in a Jeep, ISBN: 0-395-41105-X

Shaw, Nancy.  Sheep on a Ship, ISBN: 0-440-84992-6

Siebert, Diane.  Train Song, ISBN: 0-06-443340-4

Slater, Teddy.  I Want to Be a Pilot, ISBN: 0-307-131254-4

Sloan, Peter and Sheryl Sloan.  The Car Ride, ISBN: 1-56801-983-1

Smith, Jessie.  Going Places, ISBN: 0-307-10057-X

Steers, Billy.  The Little Book of Planes, ISBN: 0-375-80219-3

Sturges, Philemon.  I Love Trains! ISBN: 0-439-41805-4

Sturges, Philemon.  I Love Trucks! ISBN: 0-06-443758-2

Wickstrom, Sylvie Kantorovitz.  Wheels on the Bus, ISBN: 0-517-57645-7

Wolcott, Patty.  Double-Decker, Double-Decker, Double-Decker Bus, ISBN: 0-679-81930-4

 

Recordings/CDs

 

The Countdown Kids.  Mommy and Me: Rock-a-Bye Baby, Madacy Entertainment.

Downing, Johnette.  Fins and Grins, Wiggle Worm Records.

Downing, Johnette.  From the Gumbo Pot: Stirring Up Tasty Tunes, Wiggle Worm Records.

Downing, Johnette.  Music Time, Wiggle Worm Records.

Dr. Jean.  Rockin’ Rhymes and Good Ol’ Times.

Greg and Steve.  We all Live Together, Youngheart Records.

Greg and Steve.  On the Move, Youngheart Records.

Greg and Steve.  Playing Favorites, Youngheart Records.

Hartman, Jack. Hip-Hop Alphabet Bop 2. Hop 2 It Music,

Hartman, Jack.  Language Play and Listening Fun for Everyone! Hop 2 It Music.

Hartman, Jack.  Rhyming To Read, Hop 2 It Music.

Hartman, Jack.  Word Fiesta: It’s a Word Party!, Hop 2 It Music.

Hartman, Jack.  Math All Around Me, Hop 2 It Music.

High Reach Learning. Terrific Transportation Tunes

Raffi.  Bananaphone, Shokrline Records.

Raffi.  Singable Songs for the Very Young.

Raffi.  More Singable Songs.

Raffi. One Light One Sun.

 

 

Website Resources

 

Louisiana Public Broadcasting (LPB) United Streaming- Cyberchannel; Away We Go: All About Transportation;


Unit 8-2:  Community

Study Focus:  Community Workers (week 1 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to introduce students to the concept of work and the many jobs people do in the community.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that people do jobs in our community. Students will understand that workers help provide goods and services that we all need. Students will understand that workers are usually paid for their services. Students will understand that there are many kinds of jobs and workers.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students recognize the concepts of jobs and work?
  2. Can students understand that workers provide the goods and services people need?
  3. Can students understand that people usually work in exchange for money, goods, or services?
  4. Can students identify a variety of jobs people do in their community?

Guiding Vocabulary: community, workers, work, career, goods, services, money, jobs such as policeman, fire fighter, grocer, hair stylist, mail carrier, etc. (adapt list according to the surrounding community)

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)


 

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-13

Identify problems and solutions in stories that are read aloud (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-7-E2)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)


 

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)


 

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-3

Identify community workers and their jobs  (PK-CSS-C1) (C-1D-E3) (C-1D-E4)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)


 

 Study Focus

 

Who are Workers?

Police Officers

Firefighters

Mail Carriers

Hair Stylists & Barbers

Whole Group Activities

KWL:

Jobs People Do

ELA 3b, 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 9, 10, 11, 14c, 16, 21, 29, SS 2, 3

Brainstorm & Discussion:

I Want to be a Police Officer

ELA 4, 5d, 9, 16, 21, 29, SS 2, 3

Brainstorm & Discussion:

I Want to be a Firefighter

ELA 4, 9, 12b, 12c, 16, 21, 29, SS 2, 3

Story Chain

A Day with a Mail Carrier

ELA 4, 9, 12a, 14c, 16, 21, 29, SS 2, 3

DR-TA

Luke’s First Haircut

ELA 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b, 12c, 13, 14, 29, SS 2, 3

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Do you like to be a helper?

Do you know a police officer?

Do you know a firefighter?

Do you know a mail carrier?

Do you know a hair stylist?

Storytime

Suggested

alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography

ELA 1a, 1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Franklin’s Neighborhood

My Friend the Police Officer

Clifford, The Firehouse Dog

Dear Juno

Mommy’s At Work

Small Group Activities

Whose Tools?

Word Grid

ELA 4, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29, SCI 5, SS 2, 3

Finger print fun

ELA 15, 20, 21, 24, SCI 3, 4, 8, 11, SS 2, 3

Which is Heavier?

ELA 21, 22, 24, 29, M 6, SCI 2, 3, 4, 11, 12

A Letter to …

Learning Log

ELA 3b, 4, 9, 10, 11, 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 26

Long, longer, longest,

Seriating

ELA 24, M 3, 6

Music and Movement

A variety of bells for different sounds; bean bag games

Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Visit a fire station or post office.

Invite workers to come visit and share.


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Using restaurant order pad sheets, write numerals on each sheet. Have students count out number of pennies needed to pay the bill.

 

Measurement Mat

Compare different size coins and sort them into small, medium and large sizes.

Geometry

Have students empty a cup of pennies onto a tray and sort them into two stacks: those that landed face up (front)  and those that landed face down (back). 

Data Collection

BLM Money graph

Gather real coins if possible, children will sort coins into the correct columns on the graph then they will tally below how many of each coin they have.  If real coins are not available, use pictures provided on BLM.

Patterning

Have students use coins to copy, extend or create patterns

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

 

 

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

pulley and bucket - attach a clothesline pulley to a shelf. Cut a length of cord/rope long enough to loop over the pulley and drop to the floor on either side of the pulley. Tie one end of the cord/rope to the handle of a bucket. Provide cargo such as small blocks, rocks, or wooden cubes for students to load into the bucket, then use the rope to lift the bucket via the pulley. Discuss how the pulley makes the work easier and how some workers might use pulleys to help them lift heavy loads.

make fingerprints and examine them with magnifying glasses

grow “hair” by planting rye grass seed in disposable cups with faces drawn or pasted on them

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

play “A Tisket, A Tasket” circle game (similar to Duck, Duck, Goose)

hammering with golf tees and Styrofoam

walking a balance beam


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10,11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

SS 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

add accessories such as community worker people, pretend buildings, and signs for community workers

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9,10,11,13

SCI 9

SS 4

cookie patterning using cut-out pictures of cookies

match tools with outlines of the tools made on large sheets of paper (laminate for durability)

coupon clipping (fine motor)

coupon or label sorting: by coupon amount, same product, category of product, etc.

cereal box matching: cut out the fronts of several different kinds of cereal and have students match them

yarn braiding

locks and keys

junk mail sorting

weighing boxes for the post office

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://www.fisher-price.com/us/littlepeople/clubhouse/games.asp?section=door&gameID=LP_WhosattheDoor

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

comb painting

container construction: use grocery “trash” such at empty boxes and labels to create 3-D sculpture

junk mail collage

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

combs for creating textures in sand

Water:

clear plastic tubing and a variety of containers

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Volume 3: Community Workers - High Reach Singalong Songs

Pizza Hut – Dr. Jean


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

add props for students to pretend to be community workers

set up a hair salon area or a grocery store as an alternate dramatic play center

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

make environmental print books from food labels such as cereal, familiar restaurants, etc.

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools, such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

add props to make a pretend office or post office: envelopes, stickers for stamps, mailbox, telephone, scales, and boxes of varying sizes and weights

 

Whole Group

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Who are workers? (GLEs: ELA 3b, 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 9, 10, 11, 14c, 16, 21, 29, SS 2, 3)

 

Materials List:  Jobs People Do (book), chart paper, 3 different colored markers

 

Prior to the lesson, attach 3 sheets of chart paper to the board.

 

Create a graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions) in the form of a KWL chart. Open by writing the words “Community Workers” at the top of the first sheet of chart paper. Identify each letter as it is written, then read the words. Ask students, “Who are community workers?” Write student responses on the chart paper. This is the “K” part of the chart. Write, “I Wonder…” at the top of the second sheet of poster board, reading aloud as it is written. Ask students if they ever wonder about some of the jobs the workers do. Write appropriate responses on the second sheet of chart paper, using a different color marker than was used on the first sheet. Introduce the book, Jobs People Do, by displaying the book cover and explaining that it tells about many community workers and what they do in their jobs. Read aloud, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions. When questions or “I wonder…” statements are made about the workers, write them on the second sheet of chart paper. After the book has been read, review the charts and make any changes or additions needed. Move to the third chart and write, “I Learned…” at the top. Explain to


 

students that this is a place where they can have you write down what they have learned about community workers. Keep these charts up in a prominent location so that students and teacher can refer to them during the two week unit. Make sure students understand that they can add questions or “I wonder…” statements to chart 2 at any time. They should also know that they need to let you know when they have learned something new so that it can be written down on the “I Learned…” chart.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Police Officers (GLEs: ELA 4, 5d, 9, 16, 21, 29, SS 2, 3)

 

Materials List: If possible, have a real police officer visit the classroom to share his/her job and tools for the job. If not, then use a police uniform (real or costume), badge, walkie talkie, clipboard and  pen, I Want to be a Police Officer (book)

 

Display all the tools used by a police officer and ask students which worker uses these tools. Once students have correctly identified the tools as equipment used by a police officer, refer to the KWL charts to see that a police officer is displayed. Check to see if there are any questions already documented. Ask students to tell what they know about police officers. Many students have negative views of police officers. Encourage students to name positive and non-violent aspects of the police officer’s job. Guide discussion to help students view police officers as helpers rather than just enforcers. Dispel any misconceptions about race or gender with regard to police officers. Read the book, I Want to be a Police Officer, aloud to the students. While reading, be sure to follow the text with a pointer or finger. Pause where appropriate for questions and comments about the text. Add questions to the KWL chart. After the reading, ask students what they have learned about police officers. Write student responses on the KWL chart. Close by reviewing the KWL, emphasizing the learned information.

 

Accommodations: Guided questioning to assist students who have difficulty seeing police in a positive way.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: Firefighters (GLEs: ELA 4, 9, 12b, 12c, 16, 21, 29, SS 2, 3)

 

Materials List: If possible, have a real firefighter the class come to share his/her profession with the class. If not, then use the following: firefighter tools such as hat, gloves, hose, coat, boots, etc.; Firefighter song from “Songs for the Whole Day by Thomas Moore; Book I Want to be a Firefighter

 

Display the firefighter’s tools and ask students to tell what worker might use these tools. Refer to the KWL chart to see that firefighter is listed and to check for any questions students had about firefighters. Discuss with students the job of a firefighter. Dispel any misconceptions about race or gender with regard to firefighters. Talk about what people should do if they are in a building that’s on fire. Discuss the safety procedures for your school and “Stop, Drop, and Roll” with students. Show students the book cover and ask them to predict what they think the story will be about. Read the book, I Want to be a Firefighter, aloud to students. Pause for questions and comments. Add questions to the KWL chart. After the reading, ask

 

 

students what they have learned about firefighters. Ask if the book was what they expected it to be. Write student responses on the KWL chart. Close by playing the song “Firefighter.”

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4: A Day with a Mail Carrier (GLEs: ELA 4, 9, 12a, 14c, 16, 21, 29, SS 2, 3)

 

Materials List: If possible, have a real mail carrier come and share his/her tools and job with the students. If not, use A Day with a Mail Carrier (book), Mail Carrier from “Songs for the Whole Day” by Thomas Moore, picture cards for sequencing

 

Prior to the lesson, make a set of 8.5 x 11 inch cards with the following pictures/words or supply your own:

 

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mail

 

 

 

 

Mailbox

 

 

 

 

Mail Carrier

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post Office

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mail Carrier

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mailbox

 

 

Display the picture/word cards and ask students to orally name each picture. Ask students what they think the lesson will be about and why. Show students the front cover of the book, A Day with a Mail Carrier. Read the book aloud, pausing where appropriate for questions and comments. Refer to the KWL chart from the previous lessons. Add any new questions students asked about mail carriers. Ask students what they have learned about mail carriers and add new information to the “I Learned…” part of the KWL. Explain to students that they are going to use the picture cards to create a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) of how mail travels from one place to another. Ask students which card shows the first thing that happens with mail. Ask a volunteer to post the picture card showing the mail and describe the first step from the book as he/she does. Proceed with the steps showing the mail in a mailbox, a mail carrier picking it up, the post office where it’s sorted, a mail carrier delivering the mail, and finally another mailbox holding the mail for the recipient. Close with the “Mail Carrier” song.

 

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5: Luke’s First Hair Cut (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b, 12c, 13, 14, 29, SS 2, 3)

 

Materials List: Book Luke’s First Hair Cut, hair styling tools such as scissors, clippers, cape, comb, brush, etc.

 

Display the tools and ask students if they know who uses these tools. Allow for general discussion and sharing of personal stories about getting a haircut. Discuss the tools individually, identifying how each is used and what it’s called. Emphasize to students that cutting hair is serious business that children should never do. Display the front cover of the book. Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions) strategy, ask students to predict what the story will be about and why. Write their predictions on the board or chart paper. Read the story, pausing for comments and questions and to ask students if they predicted correctly. Was the story what they were expecting? What did they learn about Luke? Why was he nervous about getting his hair cut? What did Luke learn? Did the story have a happy or sad ending? What might have happened to change the story?

 

 

Small Group Activities

 

 

Small Group Activity 1: Whose Tools? (GLEs: ELA 4, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29, SCI 5, SS 2, 3)

 

Materials List: Jobs People Do (book), Word Grid, vis-à-vis markers

 

Prior to the lesson, create a word grid similar to the one below on chart paper:

 

 

Police Officer

Firefighter

Mail Carrier

Hair Stylist

Blow dryer

 

 

 

 

Hose

 

 

 

 

Bag

 

 

 

 

Hand Cuffs

 

 

 

 

Scissors

 

 

 

 

Flashlight

 

 

 

 

Walkie Talkies

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refer to the book read at whole group time. Ask students to think about some of the tools used by workers in the book. Invite students to help create a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) showing which workers use which tools. Assist students in identifying each tool and determining if that tool is used by the workers listed at the top of the grid. Help students mark the grid with the vis-à-vis markers, indicating yes with a check mark and no with a X mark. Keep the word grid in the classroom for students to refer to during the unit.

 

Accommodations: Assist students with correctly marking the grid and correctly identifying the tools and workers on the grid.

 

 

Small Group Activity 2: Fingerprint Fun (GLEs: ELA 15, 20, 21, 24, SCI 3, 4, 8, 11, SS 2, 3)

 

Materials List: magnifying glasses, ink pad, white paper, baby wipes, crayons or pencils

 

Invite students to make and examine fingerprints. Explain that everyone has special ridges in the tips of their fingers and those ridges can make marks called fingerprints. Explain that we all have different fingerprints; no two look exactly the same. Give each student a sheet of white paper and have him/her write his/her name on it. Assist each student with making several fingerprints on the paper. Have students immediately wipe the ink off their fingers with the baby wipes. Give each student a magnifying glass to get a close up look at his/her own fingerprints. Encourage students to look at each other’s fingerprints too. Do they look the same or are they each just a little bit different? Explain that sometimes when the police are trying to find out who has been in a place, they will look for fingerprints. Sometimes when the police find fingerprints, they can find out who was there and this can help them figure out who committed a crime.

 

Accommodations: Assist children with identifying differences between fingerprints by pointing out the small whorls and curves in the fingerprints. It may be necessary to add more light to the center for the fingerprints to be easily viewed.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 3: Which is Heavier? (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 24, 29, M 6, SCI 2, 3, 4, 11, 12)

 

Materials List: pan balance, collection of objects with range of different weights (e.g. rock, cork, pompom, key, button, crayon, etc.)

 

Ask students if they can think of a worker whose job might require them to lift heavy objects. Discuss the jobs of constructions workers, postal workers and grocers as they relate to lifting heavy objects. Talk about how these workers might use scales to weigh things in their jobs (e.g. postal workers weigh packages and letters; grocers weigh produce and meats). Ask students if they think there is a way to tell if something is heavier or lighter than something else. Display the collection of objects. Invite students to pick up the objects and notice how heavy each is in comparison to another object. Display the pan balance. Explain that the pan balance is a tool we can use to help us know if an object is heavier or lighter than another object. Ask students if they can guess how it works. Discuss the students’ ideas about how the pan balance might work. Demonstrate with two very obviously different objects such as a pompom and a rock. Before putting the objects on the balance, ask students to predict which one is heavier and which one is lighter. Ask students to predict what will happen to the pan balance when the pompom is placed on a pan. What will happen when the rock is placed in the other pan? Demonstrate this activity; then lead a discussion about what the students observed. Encourage students to try the same procedure with other objects in the collection. Tell students to predict, then test their predictions by actually weighing the objects.

 

Accommodations: Have students find their own objects to weigh.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4: A Letter to (GLEs: ELA 3b, 4, 9, 10, 11, 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 26)

 

Materials List:  A Letter to Amy (book), white paper, crayons, markers, pencils, envelopes

 

Open by reading the book A Letter to Amy, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions. Ask students if they have ever written a letter to someone. Give students a brief opportunity to share personal stories about writing or receiving letters. Ask students if they would like to write a letter to someone now. Give each student a piece of white paper and writing tools to create a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions). Encourage students to draw or write to someone they care about, just like Peter did in the story. Have students sign their own names to their “letters.”Tell students you will write their words on their letters for them. Have each student dictate what his/her letter says and write the words on the paper. Ask students to read and identify letters in their names.

 

Accommodations: Assist students having difficulty beginning by giving them extra prompts and encouragement.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 5: Long, Longer, Longest (GLEs: ELA 24, M 3, 6)

 

Materials List: varying lengths of yarn braids

 

Prior to the lesson, cut yarn into lengths and create 5 braids in graduated lengths.

 

Display the braids lined up from shortest to longest. Ask students to notice that the longest braid is on one end and the shortest is on the other end with the other braids in between. Point out that they are lined up in a way that looks similar to stairs. Explain that you are going to mix the braids up and they need to “fix” the braids so they are lined up in the correct way again. Allow students to move the braids around, lining them up from shortest to longest.

 

Accommodations: Reduce the number of braids for students who are struggling to seriate 5 braids

 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·    Small Group Activity 5: Observe and document students as they seriate the braids.

 

Resources

Children’s Books

Birney, Betty. What’s My Job?, ISBN: 0-671-76915-4

Kroll, Steven. I’d Like to Be, ISBN: 0-8193-1141-3

Lakeshore Learning Materials. Our Community, ISBN: 1-58970-415-0

Merriam, Eve. Mommies at Work, ISBN: 0-671-64386-X

Scarry, Richard. What Do People Do All Day?, ISBN: 0-394-81823-7

Burton, Virginia Lee. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, ISBN: 0-590-75803-9

De Brunhoff, Laurent. Babar Learns to Cook, ISBN: 0-394-84107-7

Hennessy, B. G. Jake Baked the Cake, ISBN: 0-590-44893-5

Priddy Books. My Big Rescue Book, ISBN: 0-312-49327-4

Moses, Diane. A Job for You, ISBN: 0-618-48151-6

Spevack, Judy. At the Store, ISBN: 0-02-147759-0

Liebman, Dan. I Want to Be a Doctor, ISBN 13: 978-1-55209-461-7

Jo, Amy. Buildings, ISBN: 0-02-147756-6

Weiss, Ellen. The Tool Box Book, ISBN: 0-307-23121-6

Chirinian, Helene. A Visit to the Dentist, ISBN: 0-8431-3275-2

Benjamin, Cynthia. I Am a Doctor, ISBN: 0-8120-6380-5

Benjamin, Cynthia. I Am a Firefighter, ISBN: 0-8120-6538-7

Benjamin, Cynthia. I Am a Police Officer, ISBN: 0-8120-6438-0

Gibbons, Gail. Fire! Fire!, ISBN: 0-590-46478-7

Bridwell, Norman. Clifford the Firehouse Dog, ISBN: 0-590-48419-2

Bridwell, Norman. Clifford’s Loose Tooth, ISBN: 0-439-33245-1

Rockwell, Anne. Fire Engine, ISBN: 0-440-84480-0

Kottke, Jan. A Day with Firefighters. ISBN: 0-516-23847-7

Kottke, Jan. A Day with Police Officers, ISBN: 0-516-24523-6

Elliott, Dan. A Visit to the Firehouse, ISBN: 0-394-86029-2

Rey, Margret and H.A. Curious George at the Fire Station, ISBN: 0-395-39031-6

Desimini, Lisa. Policeman Lou and Policewoman Sue, ISBN: 0-439-40888-1

London, Jonathan. Froggy Goes to the Doctor, ISBN: 0-439-57657-1

Berenstain, Stan and Jan. The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist, ISBN: 0-394-84836-5

Slater, Helen. What Happens When I Go to the Doctor, ISBN: 0-8317-9508-5

Zoehfeld, Kathleen W. Pooh Plays Doctor, ISBN: 0-590-27337-X

Anastasio, Dina. Roger Goes to the Doctor, ISBN: 0-87135-106-4

 

 

Rogers, Fred. Going to the Doctor, ISBN: 0-399-21298-1

Campbell, Janet. The House That Biff Built, ISBN: 0-307-23119-4

Adams, Pam. This is the House That Jack Built. ISBN: 0-85953-075-2

Ford, B. G. Don’t Forget the Oatmeal, ISBN: 0-307-23109-7

Asch, Frank. George’s Store, ISBN: 0-8193-1101-4

Gelman, Rita Golden. Stop Those Painters!, ISBN: 0-590-40959-X

Thaler, Mike. Never Mail an Elephant, ISBN:0-8167-3019-9

LeSieg, Theo. Maybe You Should Fly a Jet! Maybe You Should Be a Vet!, ISBN: 394-84448-3

Daynes, Katie. Firefighters, ISBN: 0-439-88992-8

Eckard, Leslie. My Friend The Police Officer, ISBN: 1-59340-104-3

Shira, Naomi. What Do We Do?, ISBN: 0-02-147761-2

Carle, Eric. My Apron, ISBN: 0-399-22685-0

Carle, Eric. Walter The Baker, ISBN: 0-689-82088-7

Merriam, Eve. Bam Bam Bam, ISBN: 0-590-62399-0

Morris, Ann. Tools, ISBN: 0-688-16165-0

Zimmerman, Andrea. Trashy Town, ISBN: 978-0060271398

Recordings/CDs

Dr. Jean Just For Fun

Greg and Steve Playing Favorites

High Reach Singalong Songs Volume 3: Community Workers


Unit 8-2:  Community

Study Focus:  Community Workers (week 2 of 2)

Study Focus Description: The focus of this study is to introduce students to the concept of work and the many jobs people do in the community.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that people do jobs in our community. Students will understand that workers help provide goods and services that we all need. Students will understand that workers are usually paid for their services. Students will understand that there are many kinds of jobs and workers.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students recognize the concepts of jobs and work?
  2. Can students understand that workers provide the goods and services people need?
  3. Can students understand that people usually work in exchange for money, goods, or services?
  4. Can students identify a variety of jobs people do in their community?

Guiding Vocabulary: community, workers, work, career, goods, services, money, jobs such as policeman, fire fighter, grocer, hair stylist, mail carrier, etc. (adapt list according to the surrounding community)

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)


 

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-13

Identify problems and solutions in stories that are read aloud (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-7-E2)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)


 

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)


 

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-3

Identify community workers and their jobs  (PK-CSS-C1) (C-1D-E3) (C-1D-E4)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)


 

 Study Focus

 

Construction Workers

Sanitation Workers

Chefs and Bakers

Grocery Store Workers

Doctors and Nurses

Whole Group Activities

Brainstorm

I Want to be a Builder

ELA 3, 4, 6, 9, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29, M 1, 13, SS 1

DR-TA

I Stink!

ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 13, 14c, 21, 22, 29, SS 3

Story Chain

Mr. Cookie Baker

ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12a, 14c, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 29, M 3, 7, SS 3

Brainstorm

Grocer

ELA 1d, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29, M 13, SS 3, 6

Brainstorm

I Want to be a Doctor

1d, 2, 3b, 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29, M 13, SS 3

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Can you build something?

Do you litter?

Have you helped cook at home?

Do you go to the grocery store?

Have you been to the doctor?

Storytime

Suggested

alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography

ELA 1a, 1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

This is the House that Jack Built

Trashy Town

Jake Baked the Cake

At the Store

Froggy Goes to the Doctor

Small Group Activities

My Construction

Learning Log

ELA 3a, 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 24, SS 3

Litter Patrol

ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, SS 3, 4

Cookie Patterns

ELA 21, 23, 24, M 8, 9, 13

Float or Sink?

ELA 21, 23, 24, M 12, SCI 2, 3, 5, 10

Whose Tools?

Word Grid

ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 31, SS 3

Music and Movement

A variety of bells; bean bag games

Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Invite parents or community people to come share information about their jobs.

 


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations:

Nuts and bolts match:  Get different sized nuts and bolts. Write a numeral on the head of each bolt and on the matching nut.  Have students match nuts to bolts by matching the numerals.

 

 

Measurement:

Using an assortment of bolts, have students compare their sizes and line them up from shortest to longest.

Geometry:

Using brown bags, draw a geometric shape on each bag.  Collect some clean trash items (empty Styrofoam cup, soda can, etc.).  Have students sort each item into the bag with the matching geometric shape drawn on it.

Data Collection:

BLM:  Nuts and bolts graph

Patterning:

Copy and extend patterns using nuts and bolts.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

 

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

pulley and bucket

make fingerprints and examine them with magnifying glasses

grow “hair” by planting rye grass seed in disposable cups with faces drawn or pasted on them

scent bottles: cotton ball and baking extracts such as vanilla, peppermint, lemon put into a small containers, such as Dixie cups or film canisters; make 2 of each scent and have students match them

stethoscope for listening to heartbeat and breathing

 

 

 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

play “A Tisket, A Tasket” circle game (similar to Duck, Duck, Goose)

hammering with golf tees and Styrofoam

walking a balance beam

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10,

11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

community worker people, vehicles, and pretend buildings

toy construction tools

 

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9,10,11,13

SCI 9

SS 4

cookie patterning using cut out pictures of cookies

match tools with outlines of the tools made on large sheets of paper (laminate for durability

coupon clipping (fine motor)

coupon or label sorting: by coupon amount, same product, category of product, etc.

cereal box matching: cut out the fronts of several different kinds of cereal and have students match them

yarn braiding

locks and keys

junk mail sorting

weighing boxes for the post office

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://www.fisher-price.com/us/littlepeople/clubhouse/games.asp?section=door&gameID=LP_WhosattheDoor

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

wood 3-D art

wallpaper collage; clean trash collages

large paintbrushes and mural paintings

tool prints (e.g. cookie cutters, potato masher, whisk, etc.)

fingerprint pictures

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

construction vehicles

Water:

dishes, pots and pans

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Volume 3: Community Workers - High Reach Singalong Songs

Pizza Hut – Dr. Jean

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

add props for students to play at various jobs

alternate dramatic play centers: hair salon, post office, office, doctor or dentist office, restaurant

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class made books (where applicable):

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools, such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

add props to make a pretend office or post office: envelopes, stickers for stamps, mailbox, telephone, scales, and boxes of varying sizes and weights

 

 

Whole Group

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Brainstorm (GLEs: ELA 3, 4, 6, 9, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29, M 1, 13, SS 1)

 

Materials List: I Want to be a Builder (book); chart paper, 2 markers (different colors); I Can Build with One Hammer from “Playing Favoritesby Greg and Steve; tool belt or box with common construction tools such as a hammer, drill, hand saw, screwdrivers

 

Open with song I Can Build with One Hammer. Display the tools and begin a conversation with the students about them. Ask students to identify the tools and how they might be used. Write the words “Construction Worker” in the center of the chart paper. Read each letter and each word as they are written. Ask students what they know about construction workers. Write student responses on the chart paper in a different color marker. Display the book I Want to be a Builder. Read the book aloud, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions. After reading the book, refer to the chart paper and ask students if they want to add anything else to the information about construction workers.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: I Stink! (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 13, 14c, 21, 22, 29, SS 3)

 

Materials List: I Stink! (book)

 

Ask students who takes out the trash at their houses. Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), ask students to predict what happens to the trash after it leaves their homes. Write their predictions on the board or chart paper. Give students time to discuss their ideas about what happens to the trash. Show the front of the book, I Stink!, to the class. Ask students what they think the story is about. Read the book aloud,

 

 

 

pausing where appropriate for comments and questions and to check student predictions. Following the story, ask students if they found out what happens to the trash. Were their predictions correct?

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: Mr. Cookie Baker (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12a, 14c, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 29, M 3, 7, SS 3)

 

Materials List: Mr. Cookie Baker (book); story sequence cards, baking tools such as a mixing bowl, spoon, measuring cups and spoons, mixer or whisk, chef’s hat and/or apron, etc.

 

Prior to the lesson make a set of cards similar to the ones below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Decorates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sells

 

Dressed in the chef’s hat and apron, display the other tools used by chefs and bakers. Lead a discussion about the names and uses of each tool. Ask students to share stories of times they may have helped out in the kitchen with baking or cooking other things. Read the story, Mr. Cookie Baker, aloud to the class. Pause where appropriate for comments and questions about the story events. Show the cards to the students. Discuss what each card depicts. Tell students they are going to create a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) using the cards. Ask students to recall what Mr. Cookie Baker did first in the story. Have a volunteer post the first card on the board and describe the first step as s/he does so. Repeat until all four cards have been placed in the correct order. Close by having students orally tell the story, using the story chain as a prompt.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4: Grocer (GLEs: ELA 1d, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29, M 13, SS 3, 6)

 

Materials List: chart paper, 2 markers (different colors), Grocer (book), objects used in a grocery store such as a cash register, apron, shopping bags, shopping cart or basket, coupons, scale, etc.

 

 

 

Open by reciting the Nursery Rhyme “To Market, To Market” with the students. Ask students to recall a time when they went to the grocery store or supermarket. Write the word “Grocer” in the middle of the chart paper. Read each letter and the word aloud as each is written. Explain that a grocer is a person who works in a grocery store or supermarket. Ask students what kind of work they think a grocer has to do. Give students an opportunity to brainstorm ideas about the kinds of work grocers do and write their ideas on the chart paper in a different color marker. Show students the collection of objects used in a grocery store. Discuss the names and uses of each object. Introduce the book, Grocer, to the students. Read the book aloud, pausing for comments and questions where appropriate. Ask students if they learned anything new from the book that should be added to the chart. Write any new responses on the chart. Ask students to join in as “To Market, To Market” is recited again.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5: I Want to be a Doctor (GLEs: ELA 1d, 2, 3b, 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29, M 13, SS 3)

 

Materials List: I Want to be a Doctor (book), doctor’s kit with items such as a stethoscope, otoscope, thermometer, bandages, syringe (no needle), lab jacket and/or scrub top, etc., chart paper, markers (2 colors)

 

Open with the song “Miss Lucy”:     

Miss Lucy


 Miss Lucy had a baby
She named him Tiny Tim
She put him in the bath tub
To see if he could swim
He drank up all the water
He ate up all the soap
He tried to eat the bath tub
But it wouldn't go down his throat

Miss Lucy called the Docter
Miss Lucy called the Nurse
Miss Lucy called the Lady
With the Alligator Purse

Mumps said the Doctor
Measles said the Nurse
Nothing said the Lady
With the Alligator Purse

Out went the Doctor
Out went the Nurse
Out went the Lady
With the Alligator Purse.

 

Display and discuss the medical equipment in the doctor’s kit. Ask students what they know about each object. Write the word “Doctor” in the center of the chart paper, saying each letter and the word as they are written. Ask students to brainstorm about doctors. Write student responses in a different color in the area around the word “Doctor.” Introduce and read the book, I Want to be a Doctor, to the class. Pause where appropriate for comments and questions about the book content and illustrations. Refer to the chart paper, asking students if there is anything else they would like to add to the chart. Ask students if doctors are the only ones who help us when we are sick or hurt. Guide students to realize that nurses and dentists provide care in many of the same ways doctors help others.

 

 

Small Group Activities

 

 

Small Group Activity 1: My Construction (GLEs: ELA 3a, 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 24, SS 3)

 

Materials List: Pictures of buildings, bridges, etc., white paper, markers, crayons, pencils

 

Display the pictures of buildings, bridges, and other kinds of constructions. Discuss how each of these pictures shows constructions built by construction workers. Give each student a sheet of white paper to make a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions).  Ask students to imagine they are builders/construction workers. What would they build? Ask students to draw a picture of what he/she would build. Encourage students to write and draw as much as they are able, including writing their own first names on the paper. After finishing their drawings, have students dictate a story about their construction picture. Write students’ oral dictation on their learning log paper. Collect completed papers and create a class book or display entitled “Our Construction Plans.”

 

Accommodations: Provide a variety of writing tools and support for students who may have motor difficulties.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 2: Litter Patrol (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, SS 3, 4)

 

Materials List: lunch sacks

 

Divide the class into two groups: one group for the teacher and one group for the paraprofessional to supervise during this activity. Both groups can participate in the activity simultaneously with one adult per group, or one group can stay in the classroom with the paraprofessional while the other group does the litter patrol. Then switch the groups so that all have a chance to participate.

 

Discuss with students how trash and litter affect the appearance of the school grounds. Ask students where they believe we should put our trash. Guide student discussion on the issue of litter and trash at school with questions about who should be responsible for litter and how students can show good citizenship by helping to keep the school grounds clean. Give each student a lunch sack and explain that they are to use the lunch sack to hold the litter they find on the playground. Explain the parameters of the area chosen for the litter patrol, then take the students out for a 5 minute pick up of litter. Reinforce the concepts of shared responsibility and citizenship as important aspects of this activity.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 3: Cookie Patterns (GLEs: ELA 21, 23, 24, M 8, 9, 13)

 

Materials List: light brown construction paper cut into circles, squares, triangles, and rectangles; sentence strips; glue

 

Explain to students that they are going to create patterns with the “cookies.” Have each student select “cookie” shapes and lay them out in a pattern along the length of the sentence strip. After a student has successfully created and read his/her pattern aloud, have the student glue the “cookie” shapes down on the sentence strip.

 

Accommodations: Start patterns to be extended for students who are not yet ready to create patterns on their own.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4: Float or Sink? (GLEs: ELA 21, 23, 24, M 12, SCI 2, 3, 5, 10)

 

Materials List: plastic tub filled with water, towels, 2 trays or cookie sheets, selection of fruits and vegetables

 

Prior to the lesson set up the sink or float experiment by filling the plastic tub with water and placing it on towels. Also put out the two trays or cookie sheets. On one tray put a label that says “Sinks” and on the other tray put a label that says “Floats.” Have the fruits and vegetables in a separate tub or basket.

 

Display and discuss the fruits and vegetables, identifying each by name and asking students to predict whether each will sink or float. Explain that they are going to test their predictions by putting each fruit or vegetable into the tub of water to see what it actually does. Display and read the labels on the trays. Explain that students are to sort the fruits and vegetables according to whether they sink or float. Allow students to use the materials to test their ideas about which fruits and vegetables sink or float. Supervise and guide their exploration of the materials to keep them on task and focused on the objectives but allow the students to do the actual testing and sorting.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 5: Whose Tools? (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 31, SS 3)

 

Materials List: word grid poster; vis-à-vis pens; baby wipes

 

Prior to the lesson prepare a word grid similar to the example below, laminate the word grid for durability and repeated use.

 

 

Construction Worker

 

Sanitation Worker

Chef or Baker

Grocer

Doctor or Nurse

Stethoscope

 

 

 

 

 

Garbage Truck

 

 

 

 

 

Hammer

 

 

 

 

 

Whisk

 

 

 

 

 

Scale

 

 

 

 

 

Tongue Depressor

 

 

 

 

 

Garbage Can

 

 

 

 

 

Chef Hat

 

 

 

 

 

Hard Hat

 

 

 

 

 

 

Explain to each group of students that they are going to complete a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) using the grid provided and the vis-à-vis markers. Demonstrate for each group of students how to mark the word grid with X for “no” and a check mark for “yes” responses. Discuss each of the community workers and tools featured on the word grid, making sure each student has a clear understanding of each one. Ask students to decide which tool is used by which worker and mark the grid accordingly. Once the word grid is completed, ask students if they can tell what a person’s job is by the tools used by the worker. Ask students to think of some other tools used by these and other workers. Use the baby wipes to clean off the grid after each small group has used it.

 

Accommodations: Assist students with correct vocabulary and correctly marking the word grid.

 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·    Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·    Student products

·    Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·    Teacher observations

·    Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·    Small Group Activity 3: Collect the cookie patterning work samples for portfolios.

 

 

Resources

Children’s Books

Birney, Betty. What’s My Job?, ISBN: 0-671-76915-4

Kroll, Steven. I’d Like to Be, ISBN: 0-8193-1141-3

Lakeshore Learning Materials. Our Community, ISBN: 1-58970-415-0

Merriam, Eve. Mommies at Work, ISBN: 0-671-64386-X

Scarry, Richard. What Do People Do All Day?, ISBN: 0-394-81823-7

Burton, Virginia Lee. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, ISBN: 0-590-75803-9

De Brunhoff, Laurent. Babar Learns to Cook, ISBN: 0-394-84107-7

Hennessy, B. G. Jake Baked the Cake, ISBN: 0-590-44893-5

Priddy Books. My Big Rescue Book, ISBN: 0-312-49327-4

Moses, Diane. A Job for You, ISBN: 0-618-48151-6

Spevack, Judy. At the Store, ISBN: 0-02-147759-0

Liebman, Dan. I Want to Be a Doctor, ISBN 13: 978-1-55209-461-7

Jo, Amy. Buildings, ISBN: 0-02-147756-6

Weiss, Ellen. The Tool Box Book, ISBN: 0-307-23121-6

Chirinian, Helene. A Visit to the Dentist, ISBN: 0-8431-3275-2

Benjamin, Cynthia. I Am a Doctor, ISBN: 0-8120-6380-5

Benjamin, Cynthia. I Am a Firefighter, ISBN: 0-8120-6538-7

Benjamin, Cynthia. I Am a Police Officer, ISBN: 0-8120-6438-0

Gibbons, Gail. Fire! Fire!, ISBN: 0-590-46478-7

Bridwell, Norman. Clifford the Firehouse Dog, ISBN: 0-590-48419-2

Bridwell, Norman. Clifford’s Loose Tooth, ISBN: 0-439-33245-1

Rockwell, Anne. Fire Engine, ISBN: 0-440-84480-0

Kottke, Jan. A Day with Firefighters. ISBN: 0-516-23847-7

Kottke, Jan. A Day with Police Officers, ISBN: 0-516-24523-6

Elliott, Dan. A Visit to the Firehouse, ISBN: 0-394-86029-2

Rey, Margret and H.A. Curious George at the Fire Station, ISBN: 0-395-39031-6

Desimini, Lisa. Policeman Lou and Policewoman Sue, ISBN: 0-439-40888-1

London, Jonathan. Froggy Goes to the Doctor, ISBN: 0-439-57657-1

Berenstain, Stan and Jan. The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist, ISBN: 0-394-84836-5

Slater, Helen. What Happens When I Go to the Doctor, ISBN: 0-8317-9508-5

Zoehfeld, Kathleen W. Pooh Plays Doctor, ISBN: 0-590-27337-X

Anastasio, Dina. Roger Goes to the Doctor, ISBN: 0-87135-106-4

Rogers, Fred. Going to the Doctor, ISBN: 0-399-21298-1

Campbell, Janet. The House That Biff Built, ISBN: 0-307-23119-4

Adams, Pam. This is the House That Jack Built. ISBN: 0-85953-075-2

Ford, B. G. Don’t Forget the Oatmeal, ISBN: 0-307-23109-7

Asch, Frank. George’s Store, ISBN: 0-8193-1101-4

Gelman, Rita Golden. Stop Those Painters!, ISBN: 0-590-40959-X

Thaler, Mike. Never Mail an Elephant, ISBN:0-8167-3019-9

LeSieg, Theo. Maybe You Should Fly a Jet! Maybe You Should Be a Vet!, ISBN: 394-84448-3

Daynes, Katie. Firefighters, ISBN: 0-439-88992-8

Eckard, Leslie. My Friend The Police Officer, ISBN: 1-59340-104-3

Shira, Naomi. What Do We Do?, ISBN: 0-02-147761-2

Carle, Eric. My Apron, ISBN: 0-399-22685-0

Carle, Eric. Walter The Baker, ISBN: 0-689-82088-7

Merriam, Eve. Bam Bam Bam, ISBN: 0-590-62399-0

Morris, Ann. Tools, ISBN: 0-688-16165-0

Zimmerman, Andrea. Trashy Town, ISBN: 978-0060271398

Recordings/CDs

Dr. Jean - Just For Fun

Greg and Steve - Playing Favorites

High Reach Singalong Songs Volume 3: Community Workers