Unit 10-1:  Louisiana

Study Focus:  Music and Stories

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on some traditional music and stories from Louisiana culture and Louisiana’s state symbols.

Student Understandings: Students will recognize some of the Louisiana state symbols. Students will understand that Jazz, Blues, and Zydeco music are important music genres in Louisiana culture. Students will understand that many stories incorporate traditions, animals, people and places in Louisiana.

Guiding Questions:

1.      Can students recognize Louisiana state symbols?

2.      Can students understand that music is an important part of Louisiana life?

3.      Can students appreciate the variety of music genres traditional to Louisiana?

4.      Can students appreciate stories and literature based on or about Louisiana life?

Guiding Vocabulary: symbols, map, magnolia, flag, Catahoula Leopard dog, cypress tree, alligator, blues, jazz, zydeco, Louisiana, c ajun

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-2

Demonstrate understanding of phonemic awareness by manipulating and identifying individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken words with three sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)


 

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-13

Identify problems and solutions in stories that are read aloud (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-7-E2)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)


 

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)


 

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Louisiana Introduction

Louisiana Stories

Louisiana Music

Louisiana People

State of Louisiana

Whole Group Activities

Louisiana Introduction:

“P” is for Pelican

Petite Rouge  

Louisiana music

Feliciana Feydra le Roux

Louisiana, Louisiana, What Do You See?

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Do you live in Louisiana?

Do you like gumbo?

Do you like jazz? blues? Cajun music?

Have you ever seen an alligator?

Can you make a capital “L” with your fingers?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25, 29

“L” is for Louisiana

Today is Monday

(song and props)

Rat-a-tat-tat;

Charlie Parker Bee-bop

Feliciana Feydra LeRoux

Louisiana Alphabet

Small Group Activities

“L” is For Louisiana

La Trois Le Cochons

What a Wonderful World

Sequence “There Was an Ol’ Cajun”

Professor Know-It-All

Music and Movement

 The Second Line by Johnette Downing with scarves

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Storyteller, Grandma and/or Grandpa, Musician, Cook/chef


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Die-cut Mardi Gras masks and doubloons:  Write numerals on the masks and have students count out the correct number of doubloons to go with each mask.

Measurement

Using a commercially available Grow an Alligator Kit, have students record the growth of the synthetic alligator each day and compare it to the previous day’s measurement.

Geometry

Use Mardi Gras beads to make different shapes.

Data Collection

BLM: Graph What is your favorite Louisiana story?

Patterning

BLM: Complete pattern with doubloons.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,  6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 5,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

musical instruments, photographs of Louisiana places of interest, a variety of fishing weights, crawfish or crab net, Mardi Gras beads to weigh with pan balance, doubloons for weighing with a pan balance

 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

doubloon toss into Mardi Gras cups, a Mardi Gras bead relay, Saints, LSU, Tulane, or local college of your choice t-shirts, football


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10,

11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

local map, photographs of local Louisiana places—grocery stores, museums, banks, bayous, waterways, State Parks—to place on blocks to use as symbols and signs

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

use a Louisiana state outline diecut symbol to make a matching or numerical order game using the numerals 1 – 10

Louisiana bingo created from clipart, boardmaker, stickers, and diecuts

instrument matching game using clipart, diecuts, stickers, or boardmaker, plastic or rubber Louisiana animals for seriating largest to smallest

fishing lures without hooks for sorting on mats in the shape of a pond or lake,

variety of links of Mardi Gras beads cut for seriation, doubloons of different colors for sorting, patterning, or counting

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://www.mobypincher.com

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

Louisiana collage using clipart, cutouts from Louisiana brochures, a travel magazines, stamps and stencils, collage using Louisiana natural resources - moss, leaves, tree branches, pine straw, acorns, etc., doubloon prints with paint, Mardi Gras bead prints using purple, green, and gold paint

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

cut up lengths of Mardi Gras beads, doubloons, throws caught from parades, Mardi Gras cups, king cake babies

 

Water:

fishing pole, plastic fish, rubber ducks, plastic trees

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments —add steel drum, spoons

Some featured songs:

Feliciana LeRoux, Bon Jour Mes Amis, Loup Garou - Johnette Downing

Laissez Les Bon Temps Rouler, Let’s Go! Fais Do Do!, Fais Do Do!, Zydeco Dancing- Papillion

What a Wonderful World - Louis Armstrong


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

Louisiana box—map of Louisiana and Louisiana areas, state brochures, Fleur De Leis items, Saints, LSU, Tulane, Southern, or local college t-shirts, Louisiana tourism book, a music catalog

 

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

A music catalog, Louisiana tourism book, Louisiana State Park brochure, symphony or musical venue playbill

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; stencils; variety of writing tools such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

Louisiana state map; Louisiana travel brochures; names of local attractions; musical instrument names

 

 

Whole Group Activities

 

 

Whole Group Activity 1: “P” is for Pelican (ELA 4, 9, 11; SS 2)

 

Materials List:  P is for Pelican (book), dry erase board, markers, map of Louisiana, map of the United States of America

 

Show the cover of the book to the students and read the title of the book.  Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), ask the students to predict what the story will be about.  Write their predictions on the board. Read the story, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions.  At the end of the story, ask the students whether the story was as expected and have them provide reasons why and why not.  List their final answers next to each prediction on the board.  Show the map of United States to the students and discuss where Louisiana is located as well as its shape.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2:  Petite Rouge   (ELA 3, 4, 7, 9, 11, 16, 24)

 

Materials List:  Petite Rouge (book), Little Red Riding Hood (book), dry erase board, markers

 

Describe to the students that many stories in Louisiana folklore incorporate traditions, animals, people, and places in Louisiana.  Show them the book Little Red Riding Hood and ask them to describe the story line and who the characters are.  Write their responses on the dry erase board.  Then, show them the book Petite Rouge and explain that petite rouge is French for little red.  Read Petite Rouge and ask the students to list its characters and the similarities and difference between them.  In order to summarize, have the students identify different traditions, animals, people, and places that were mentioned in the two stories.  List these on the dry erase board as well.

 

Accommodations:  Assist any student who has difficulty remembering the story line of either book. If the teacher chooses to do a compare and contrast activity, both books will need to be read before comparisons. This may be done in two different group times.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3:  Louisiana Music   (ELA 16, 28; M 13; SCI 3, 17)

 

Materials needed:  CD player, CDs: “In the Gumbo Pot”  by Johnette Downing, “The Marsalis Family” by the Marsalis Family, “South of A1A” by Sonny Landreth, “Zydeco” by Zachary Richard, word cards with pictures of jazz, blues, zydeco for the students to hold, dry erase board, markers

 

Discuss the importance of music in Louisiana’s culture.  Explain that music is played at festivals, family gatherings, at fais do do’s, craft fairs, homes, virtually everywhere, and that each song has a story to be told.  These stories tell the tales of local residents and their lives, e.g., their good times, their hard times, their family traditions, and the feelings that people have for each other and their land.  Introduce the three types of music (e.g., jazz, blues, zydeco) by playing the CDs and describe each of their unique genres.  Ask the students to choose the picture card that matches with the type of music they heard. Ask them which genre they liked the most and why.  List these responses on the dry erase board.

 

Accommodations: Students may need help and prompting to determine which musical genre was played.

 

 


 

Whole Group Activity 4:  Feliciana Feydra LeRoux   (ELA 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 11, 16; SCI 3, 15, 17)

 

Materials List:  Feliciana Feydra LeRoux (book), “From the Gumbo Pot” (CD), dry erase board, markers

 

Play the song Feliciana Feydra LeRoux and encourage the students to clap, keep the rhythm, and sing along.  Introduce the book by showing and discussing its cover.  Read the book, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions.   Ask the students to sequence the story using a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) and list student responses on the board.  Play the song again and ask the students to find something new that they had not heard the first time.  Ask the students to listen for rhyming words within the song. List these responses on the board as well.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty understanding the Cajun accents and the story line of the book.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5:  Louisiana, Louisiana, What Do You See?  (ELA 9, 12, 16; SCI 15, 17; SS 2)

 

Materials List:  Dig Into Louisiana’s Gumbo of State Symbols (compiled by the Office of the Secretary of State (www.sos.louisiana.gov ), teacher-made book Louisiana, Louisiana, What Do You See?, dry erase board, markers

 

Preparation for this lesson includes downloading a copy of this booklet for your use during the lesson and making a second copy of a teacher-made book titled Louisiana, Louisiana, What Do You See?.  This teacher-made book will include cut-outs of the various symbols identified in the original version, e.g., alligator, magnolia, Catahoula Leopard dog, pelican, Cyprus tree, black bear, crawfish, honey bee, the state flag.  Each separate cut-out will be glued to its own page so that the final product includes each symbol.  This book will be entitled Louisiana, Louisiana, What Do You See? (a take on Brown Bear, Brown Bear) and will then be read to the students.  Have the students read along with each symbol as is done with Brown Bear, Brown Bear. List these responses on the dry erase board.  Place the book in the reading center for future reference.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

\


 

Small Group Activities

 

 

Small Group Activity 1: “L” is for Louisiana   (ELA 3, 4, 14, 24; SS 2)

 

Materials List:  “L” is for Louisiana (book), alphabet letters A-Z

 

Show the cover of the book and introduce the letter “L” as the capital letter that begins the word Louisiana.  Ask the students to predict what the story line of the book will be.  Show the students the alphabet cards from A-Z.  Hand each student an alphabet card and instruct them to stand up and come forward when their letter is used in the book.  Once the students have shared their letter with the rest of the class, have them return to their seats.  When the story has been told, instruct the students to stand and show their letter again when the teacher calls it out in reference to its use in the book.  Have the students make a line from A-Z to demonstrate the alphabet.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty identifying their letters.

 

Small Group Activity 2:  La Trois le Cochons    (ELA 4, 6, 7, 25, 31)

 

Materials List:  The Three Little Pigs (book), La Trois le Cochons (book), dry erase board, markers

 

Re-introduce The Three Little Pigs and discuss the story line.  Inform the students that, oftentimes, tales from Louisiana include animals, people, and places.  These tales tell the same story as the original but with a little bit of lagniappe or a twist to the story line that is unique to Louisiana.  Read the book La Trois le Cochons and discuss its story line.  Use a variety of voices as you read the book and encourage the students to say the recurring story line. Have the students identify similarities and differences between the two versions.  Write these on the dry erase board. 

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty identifying similarities and differences between the two versions.

 

 

Small Group Activity 3:  What a Wonderful World      (ELA 6, 10, 12, 19, 28; SCI 3, 15, 17)

 

Materials List:  What a Wonderful World (book), What a Wonderful World (CD by Louis Armstrong), one long roll of butcher paper, crayons, markers

 

Introduce Louis Armstrong as being a famous trumpet player and jazz musician from Louisiana.  Share the fact that “What a Wonderful World” was recorded by Louis Armstrong and it became not only his signature song but one that has been famous all over the world.  Mr. Armstrong was considered to be an ambassador for jazz all over the world.  Play the song for the students.  Refer to the book and indicate that the words of the song

 

serve as the story line for the book.  Read the book. The teacher will then take the students outside to identify wonderful things that they see in their world.

 

Accommodations:  Assistant will stay with half of the class, while the teacher takes the small group outside.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4:  There Was an Ol’ Cajun        (ELA 4, 6, 11, 12, 13, 14; M 3, 6)

 

Materials List:  There Was an Ol’ Cajun (book), markers, cut-outs or cards with the names of the animals in the text

 

Introduce the word Cajun to the students. Explain that the Cajuns were people that lived in another country called Canada, and they moved to their new home in Louisiana. Many stories, songs, and history referred to the members of the Cajun people and the way they lived.  Introduce the book and indicate that this particular story is a Cajun tale modeled after the story “There Was on Old Lady that Swallowed a Fly.”  Read the book and have the students participate in a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions).  Pass out the character cards to students and have students retell the story, in sequential order. Discuss the sizes of the animals that the Ol’ Cajun swallowed and the order he swallowed them. Draw attention to the cultural interpretation of the original story, e.g., the new story’s being told from the point of view of the Cajun culture.

 

Accommodations:  The teacher may use a map to indicate where Canada and Louisiana are located depending upon the students’ interest and attention span.

 

 

Small Group Activity 5:  Professor Know-It-All     (ELA 16, 24; SS 5)

 

Materials List:  Professor Know-It-All hat, Louisiana symbols taken from the Secretary of State book, dry erase board, markers

 

Review the symbols for the state of Louisiana as you place them in the middle of the floor.  Instruct the students that everyone will have a turn at playing professor know-it-all  (view literacy strategy descriptions) and wearing the Professor Know-It-All hat.  As each student plays the professor, instruct them to retrieve a symbol from the floor, name the symbol, and share what they have learned about that particular symbol.  As each student shares a symbol, write the name of the symbol and all related information about it as described by the students on the board.  Continue the game until all students have had an opportunity to play Professor Know-It-All.

 

Accommodations:  Assist any student who has difficulty remembering the symbols.

 

 

 


 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Small Group Activity 4: Observe and document the students’ abilities to participate in the story chain.

 

·         Small Group Activity 5: Observe and document the students’ answers and participation in Professor Know-It-All.

 

 

Resources

Children’s Books

 

Arnold, Carolyn. A Walk in the Woods, ISBN: 0-67-68665-8

Arrigo, Joseph A. Steamboats on the River Coloring Book, ISBN: 1-56554-316-5

Artell, Mike. 3 Little Cajun Pigs, ISBN: 0-88037-2815-8

Artell, Mike. Petit Rouge: A Cajun Red Riding Hood, ISBN: 0-8037-2514-0

Baker, Keith. Quack and Count, ISBN: 0-15-205025-6

Birchman, David F. Brother Bjlly Bronto’s Bygone Blues Band, ISBN: 0-688-10423-1

Blazek, Mary Alice. Clovis Crawfish and Batiste Beta Puante, ISBN: 0-88289-952-X

Carvin, Ruth. A Visit to New Orleans, ISBN: 0-9616390-2-4

Collins, Sheila Hebert. Cendrillon: A Cajun Cinderella, ISBN: 1-56554-326-2

Collins, Sheila Hebert. Jolie Blonde and the Three Heberts: A Cajun Twist on an Old Tale, ISBN: 1-56554-324-6

 

Collins, Sheila Hebert. Les Trois Cochons, ISBN: 1-56554-325-4

Collins, Sheila Hebert. Petite Rouge: A Cajun Twist to an Old Tale, ISBN: 1-56554-310-6

Dartez, Cecilia Casrill. Jenny Giraffe and the Streetcar Party, ISBN: 0-88289-962-7

Dartez, Cecilia Casrill. Jenny Giraffe Discovers the French Quarter, ISBN: 0-88289-819-1

Dartez, Cecilia Casrill. L is for Louisiana, ISBN: 1-58980-022-2

Delacre, Lulu. Nathan’s Fishing Trip, ISBN: 0-590-41282-5

Fontenot, Mary Alice. Clovis Crawfish and Bertile’s Bon Voyage, ISBN 13: 9781589805415

Fontenot, Mary Alice. Clovis Crawfish and His Friend, ISBN: 0-88289-479-X         

Kadair, Deborah Ousley. Grandma’s Gumbo, ISBN: 1-58980-133-4

Kadair, Deborah Ousley. There Was an Ol’ Cajun, ISBN: 1-56554-917-1

LaDoux, Rita C. Louisiana, ISBN: 0-8225-9786-1

Moore, Lillian. Little Raccoon’s Night Time Adventure, ISBN: 0-307-10255-6

Parker, Laurie. Louisiana Alphabet, ISBN: 1-893062-31-7

Prieto, Anita C. P is for Pelican: A Louisiana Alphabet, ISBN: 1-58536-137-2

Raschka, Chris. Charlie Parker Played Be Bop, ISBN: 0-531-05999-5

Rey, Margret and H. A. Curious George Visits an Amusement Park, ISBN: 0-590-42813-6

St. Pierre, Todd-Michael. The Louisiana State Bird Beauty Pageant, ISBN: 0-9675170-0-1

St. Romain, Rose Anne. Moon’s Cloud Blanket, ISBN: 1-56554-922-8

Szekeres, Cyndy. A Fine Mouse Band, ISBN: 0-307-11999-8

Thomassie, Tynia. Feliciana Feydra LeRoux: A Cajun Tall Tale, ISBN: 0-316-84459-4

Thompson, Gare. Parades!, ISBN: 0-8172-8222-X

Vidrine, Beverly B. A Mardi Gras Dictionary, ISBN: 1-56554-332-7

Visser, Reona and Children of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Story of a Storm, ISBN: 1-893062-86-4

Weiss, George David and Bob Thiele, What a Wonderful World, ISBN: 0-439-20746-0

 

CDs

 

Louis Armstrong; The Millennium CD

Johnette Downing; In the Gumbo Pot,

Johnette Downing; Second Line

Sonny Landreth; South of A1A

Marsalis Family; The Marsalis Family

Papillion; Cajun and Zydeco for Kids,

Papillion; Cajun for Kids

Putumayo Kids; New Orleans Playground

 

 

Website Resources

 

www.wwoz.org – live streaming of jazz, blues, zydeco, and Cajun music

www.live365.com/stations/radiola - Louisiana music

http://datadragon.com/education/genres - a variety of virtual musical instruments are shown and played


Unit 10-2:  Louisiana

Study Focus:  Food and Agriculture

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on the importance of agriculture and traditional foods in Louisiana.

Student Understandings: Students will understand the meaning of the word agriculture and that agriculture is an important source of jobs in our state. Students will understand that many common foods are grown in Louisiana. Students will understand that there are many special foods associated with Louisiana.

Guiding Questions:

1.      Can students identify the different forms of agriculture in Louisiana?

2.      Can students recognize some special Louisiana dishes?

3.      Do students understand that farming is an important job in Louisiana?

4.      Do students understand that many common products come from crops grown in Louisiana?

Guiding Vocabulary: agriculture, crop, farm, farming, rice, corn, sugar cane, catfish, crawfish, soybeans, strawberries, oranges, peaches, traditional, recipe

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-2

Demonstrate understanding of phonemic awareness by manipulating and identifying individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken words with three sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and a printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)


ELA-29


Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)


 

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)


 

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)


 

 Study Focus

 

Where does our food come from?

Catfish, Crawfish, and Seafood

Strawberries, Oranges, and Peaches

Rice, Sweet Potatoes, and Corn

Louisiana Food Festival

Whole Group Activities

SQPL

Pasta Please!

ELA 4, 9, 14c, 16, 21, 22, 29, SCI 22

Story Chain

Grandma’s Gumbo

ELA 1d, 5a, 5b, 5c, 6, 12a, 12b, 21, M 3, 11, 13

Story Chain

From Pit to Peach Tree

ELA 5a, 5c, 12b, 23, 24, SCI 2, 3, 21, 22

DR-TA

Everybody Cooks Rice

ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 5d, 12b, 12c, 14c, 21, 22, SCI 3, 21

Tasting Party

ELA 21, 22, 26, SCI 3, 17, 18, 20, 21, SS 2, 4

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you seen wheat?

Do you like to eat gumbo?

Do you like peaches?

Do you like rice?

Do you like to eat crawfish?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

From Kernel to Corncob

Clovis Crawfish and His Friends

The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear

Sweet Potato Pie

P is for Pelican

Small Group Activities

Today is Monday in Louisiana

ELA 1d, 6, 12a, 24, 27, 28, M 3, 7, 13

Gumbo Pot Game

ELA 1b, 1d, 2, 12a, 27

Story Chain

From Pit to Peach Tree

ELA 12a, 23, 24, M 3, 11, SCI 22

 Sweet Potato Pie - Cooking

ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, M 10,  SCI 5, 13, 14, 21

Word Grid

Spicy, salty, sweet, sticky

ELA 21, 24, 31, M 1, 5, SCI 3, 5, 21

Music and Movement

rice, corn, and wheat maracas (plastic drink bottles partially filled with the dried grains) used as rhythm instruments with Cajun and Zydeco music

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

farmer, gardener, LSU Extension Agent, grocer


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Crawfish counting with paper plates and rubber crawfish:  Cut paper plate from outside edge to center of plate. Roll plate to form a cone and tape in place. This will make pretend crawfish houses.  Write numerals 1-10 on each house. Have students count out crawfish for each house according to the numeral written on the house, then set the house on top of cawfish that were counted out.

Measurement

Compare the lengths of different Mardi Gras Beads to each other and see which are the same length, which are longer and which are shorter.  Next, have students line up from left to right the shortest strand of Mardi Gras Beads to the longest.

Geometry

Place the paper plate crawfish houses on the floor. Give plastic crawfish to students and have them place under, beside, behind etc. each mound as directions are given by the teacher. Have students describe where they placed the crawfish, using positional words.

Data Collection

BLM Graph: What is your favorite Louisiana food?

Patterning

BLM: Have students use small rubber crawfish and alligators to copy, extend, or create patterns.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,  6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 5,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

root a sweet potato; basket of real fruits and vegetables to weigh and measure, food products to correlate with the fresh foods; photos of farming activities and foods common to LA; LA Gardening magazines, Informational brochures from LSU Ag, Live crawfish


 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

Hot Potato Game (with a sweet potato); Fishing Game; Popcorn movement

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10,11

SCI 3,  9, 16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

tractors and other kinds of farm implements; posters/photos of farmlands; Fishing net and pole and plastic or rubber fish

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

sorting, counting, and patterning fruit and vegetable counters

fruit and vegetable lotto

seriate plastic vegetables according to size

crawfish counters

fish counters;

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://www.uptoten.com/kids/kidsgames-mixedbag-storygame.html

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

gumbo pot collage (cut colored paper to represent the ingredients of gumbo and have students glue them to the pot-shaped base)

fruit and vegetable prints (real or plastic), fish prints (real or plastic), dried beans and rice collage (similar to gumbo pot)

*Note: Do not use red beans because the uncooked skins are toxic.

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

substitute beans and rice for sand; add a pan balance and scoops for measuring

*Note: Do not use red beans because the uncooked skins are toxic.

Water:

add fish and fishing poles and nets; add plastic crabs and crawfish

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Today is Monday in Louisiana, Gumbo Pot, Crawfish Song - Johnette Downing

Jambalaya, Crawfish, Watermelon Man - Papillion

I Like Potatoes - Greg and Steve


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

Put in a gumbo pot with pretend ingredients and recipe cards for the items needed to make gumbo; LA cookbooks and cooking magazines;

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

gardening and farming magazines

cooking magazines

word cards with pictures of Louisiana foods.

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; stencils; variety of writing tools, such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

farming and cooking magazines; cookbooks and recipe cards; word cards with pictures of Louisiana grown foods and the corresponding word printed on the same card

 

 

 

Whole Group

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Pasta Please! (GLEs: ELA 4, 9, 14c, 16, 21, 22, 29, SCI 22)

 

Materials List: Pasta Please!(book), chart paper or white board, markers

 

Use a SQPL strategy (view literacy strategy descriptions) by displaying the front cover of the book and then pausing for students’ comments about the illustration on the front cover. Say, “Our foods grow on farms.” Write this statement on the chart paper or white board, repeating the statement as it is written. Ask students to think about the statement and ask them to share their thoughts while looking at the book. What do they think it means? Ask if anyone has any “I wonder” statements or questions about the book or the statement, “Our foods grow on farms.” Encourage students to think of comments or questions relating to the book and the statement. Write these questions and “I wonder” comments on the board or chart paper. Read the questions and comments aloud as often as necessary to keep students’ interest and to maintain focus on the topic. Before reading the book, remind students to listen carefully for the answers to their questions and things they wondered about. Read the book aloud, pausing often to refer to questions, comments and answers as they occur in the book. As questions/I wonders are addressed in the book, pause to refer  to them on the board and discuss the answers with the class. Write brief answers (in a different color marker) near the questions on the board/chart paper. After reading the book, return to the list of questions/I wonders to see if any of the questions remain

 

unanswered. Answer these with teacher knowledge or by providing other resources of information. Tell students that asking questions and wondering about something usually leads to learning something new.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Grandma’s Gumbo (GLEs: ELA 1d, 5a, 5b, 5c, 6, 12a, 12b, 21, M 3, 11, 13)

 

Materials List: Grandma’s Gumbo Pot (book), black plastic pot (witches cauldron available during Halloween), apron, large wooden spoon, cut-outs from copied illustrations in the book or props to simulate the ingredients: oil, flour, rice, salt, celery, onion, green bell pepper, okra, tomato, shrimp, oyster, crab, green onion, garlic, parsley, hot sauce, and filé

 

Display the book and read the title, following the text with a finger or pointer. Ask students to predict what they think this book might be about. Pause for student responses. Read the story aloud, encouraging students to chorally join in on the predictable stanza occurring throughout the story. After the reading, tell students they are going to create a modified story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) using the props along with the book as a guide to help keep everything in the correct sequence. Ask for a student volunteer to be in charge of the book and another volunteer to be Grandma. “Grandma” wears the apron and sits next to the pot stirring in the ingredients. The student with the book helps keep the rest of the students in the correct order as the ingredients are added to the pot. Give each of the remaining students an ingredient to add at the correct time. With teacher guidance, have the students act out and retell the story in the correct sequence. Encourage the student in charge of the book to turn the pages and tell the students with the ingredients when to come forward and add their part to the gumbo. Encourage “Grandma” to stir in each ingredient and all students to chorally recite the repetitive stanza. As students add their ingredients, they should be encouraged to orally tell what they are adding to the gumbo pot.

 

Accommodations: The illustrations from the book could be photocopied and made into a flannel board story that can be placed in the Books and Listening Center. Story props can be placed in the Dramatic Play Center.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: From Pit to Peach Tree (GLEs: ELA 5a, 5c, 12b, 23, 24, SCI 2, 3, 21, 22)

 

Materials List: From Pit to Peach Tree (book), real peaches, strawberries, and oranges

 

Open by showing students the fruits and asking if they know where they come from. Pass the fruits around the group, allowing students to touch and smell the fruits. Guide a discussion about the fruits, where they grow, how they grow, and how they are eaten. Inform students that these fruits, and many other fruits and vegetables, are grown in Louisiana. Introduce the book by displaying the cover and reading the title while following the text with a finger or pointer. Ask students what they think the book will tell us about peaches. Allow students to discuss the book cover and title and their thoughts about them. Read the book aloud, pausing where appropriate for questions and comments. Close by asking students to recall the names of the fruits and telling them that the fruits will be placed in the Science Center for further examination.

 

Accommodations: Check for food and contact allergies before allowing students to handle these foods.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4: Everybody Cooks Rice (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 5d, 12b, 12c, 14c, 21, 22, SCI 3, 21)

 

Materials List: Everybody Cooks Rice (book), rice, sweet potatoes, corn on a cob

 

Display the rice, sweet potatoes, and corn. Explain to the students that these foods are grown in Louisiana. Allow students to examine the foods (touch and smell) as the class discusses how the foods are grown by LA farmers. Talk about how we buy, cook, and eat each of these foods. Give students time to share personal stories about how these foods are eaten by their families. Using the DR-TA strategy (view literacy strategy descriptions), show students the front cover of the book. Read the title, following the text with a finger or pointer. Ask students to make predictions about what the story might be about. Write predictions on the board or chart paper. Read the story aloud, pausing for comments, questions and to allow students to revise their predictions. Following the story, ask students if the story was what they were expecting. Refer to the written predictions and ask students if any of them were correct.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5: LA Food Festival (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 26, SCI 3, 17, 18, 20, 21, SS 2, 4)

 

Materials List: a variety of traditional LA dishes and dishes prepared with LA produce/products (may vary according to individual location and tastes), disposable plates, bowls, and eating utensils, LA music, a variety of LA produce and products

 

Invite parents to provide traditional LA dishes and to join the class for a LA Food Festival. Create a festive atmosphere by playing LA music, such as Blues, Jazz, Country, and Zydeco. Set up a display of LA produce and products. Encourage students to share their knowledge with parents and visitors by telling them about the various foods grown and made in Louisiana. Prepare tasting plates/bowls from the dishes of foods and distribute them to students and visitors.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Small Groups

 

Small Group Activity 1: Today is Monday in Louisiana (GLEs: ELA 1d, 6, 12a, 24, 27, 28; M 3, 7, 13)

 

Materials List: Today is Monday in Louisiana by Johnette Downing (book), Today is Monday in Louisiana from the music CD “From the Gumbo Pot” by Johnette Downing, teacher-made story cards

 

Prior to the lesson, make story cards by copying the illustrations of the foods featured on each day of the week. Using cardstock, write a day of the week on each story card and attach the corresponding food to the card, e.g. Monday with the illustration of red beans and rice. Laminate the cards for durability.

 

Invite seven students to the group (one per day of the week). Read the book aloud to the group. Following the reading, explain that they will now participate in retelling the story along with the music. Give each student a story card. Students will hold up their cards when their day/food is featured in the song/book. Encourage students to sing along with the song. Play the song and prompt students to hold up their cards at the designated time. Allow students to trade cards and replay the game again. Encourage students to sing along as they play.

 

Accommodations: Assist students who have difficulty keeping up with their turn to hold up their story card.

 

 

Small Group Activity 2: Gumbo Pot Game (GLEs: ELA 1b, 1d, 2, 12a, 27)

 

Materials List: plastic gumbo pot, props from Grandma’s Gumbo story

 

Before introducing the game, teach students how to keep a beat by clapping hands then slapping their thighs in a rhythmic pattern. Introduce the idea of keeping beat with the syllables of the words in a chant. Give each student in the group one or more “ingredient” to add to the gumbo pot. Teach students the following chant:

            Gum – bo pot,

            Gum – bo pot,

            What would you put in the

            Gum – bo pot?

 

            Gum – bo pot,

            Gum – bo pot,

            (child’s name) put (ingredient)

            in the Gum – bo pot!

 

As a student’s name is chanted, he/she will add an ingredient to the pot and that ingredient will be part of the chant. Continue this game until all ingredients have been added.

 

Accommodations: Limit the number of ingredients used to make the activity shorter and to maintain student interest.

 

 

Small Group Activity 3: From Pit to Peach Tree – Story Chain (ELA 12a, 23, 24; M 3, 11; SCI 22)

 

Materials List: From Pit to Peach Tree (book), peach life cycle pictures (photocopied from the book), 11 x 18 construction paper

 

Prior to the lesson, make 4 sets of the peach life cycle pictures. Cut out the pictures, mount them on index cards and laminate for durability. After laminating, code the backs of the cards by numbering them in the correct sequence. Cut the 11 x 18 construction paper in half, lengthwise, to create a strip for students to place the life cycle cards in order. Draw the appropriate number of lines to create a section for each card. Number these spaces to correspond with the life cycle cards. Laminate these strips for durability.

 

Review the basic points of the book, then tell students they are going to work together to create a life cycle story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) using information from the book. Give a set of peach life cycle cards and a construction paper mat to the students. Instruct them to work together to put the cards in the correct order as described in the story. Have each group orally describe the growth sequence from pit to peach tree.

 

Accommodations: Assist students by prompts such as: “What happens first? What happens after the tree blooms? What happens last?”

 

 

Small Group Activity 4: Sweet Potato Pie - Cooking (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24; M 10;  SCI 5, 13, 14, 21)

Materials List: two 9-inch unbaked pie shells, 2 large sweet potatoes – boiled, 12 tablespoons butter, 6 eggs, 1 1/2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon vanilla, oven – preheated to 400 degrees, mixing bowl, rubber spatula, potato masher, measuring spoons, measuring cups, electric mixer, optional: whipped topping

All Groups: Check for food allergies. Have students wash hands before coming to this activity. Divide the ingredients into smaller amounts so that each student can add something to the pie mixture. Explain to the students that they are going to assist in mixing the ingredients for sweet potato pie that will later be served as a snack. Explain that each small group will add some of the ingredients to make 2 pies.

 

Group One: Show students the boiled sweet potatoes and compare them to the uncooked potatoes. Remove the peel from the boiled potatoes and have students take turns adding 2 or 3 tablespoons of butter before mashing the potatoes with a potato masher (Divide 12 tablespoons of butter by the number of students in the group to determine how much butter each student should add to the mixture.)

 

Group Two: Invite students to add eggs to the sweet potato mixture. Depending on the skills of students in the class, the teacher may allow students to actually crack eggs into a bowl, then dump the egg into the mixture or crack the eggs for students and have them just pour the egg into the mixture. Give each student an opportunity to hold the electric hand mixer and mix his/her egg into the sweet potatoes. This should be closely supervised by the teacher for safety reasons.

 

Group Three: Divide the sugar into portions equal to the number of students in the group. Give each student an opportunity to add sugar to the mixture and use the electric hand mixer to mix it into the sweet potatoes.

 

Group Four: Divide the milk into portions. Invite students to take turns adding milk or cinnamon or vanilla to the mixture. Give each student an opportunity to add an ingredient to the mixture and mix it in with the electric hand mixer.

 

After all ingredients have been blended in, divide it between the two pie crusts. Bake for 15 minutes on 400 degrees then lower the oven temperature to 325 degrees for 30 minutes. Let the pies cool completely then serve small slices for snacks. Optional: add whipped topping

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 5: Louisiana Foods (GLEs: ELA 21, 24, 31; M 1, 5; SCI 3, 5, 21)

 

Materials List: word grid, a variety of Louisiana foods, marker

 

Prior to the lesson, prepare a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) similar to the one below:

 

 

Spicy

Salty

Sweet

Peaches  

 

 

 

Gumbo                

 

 

 


 

Fried Catfish 

 

 

 

Strawberries

 

 

 

Red Beans and Rice

 

 

 


Invite students to participate in completing the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) after they eat their sample plates at the Louisiana Food Festival. Students may come in small groups or individually and mark the word grid with tally marks according to their own opinions about the ways the foods taste. This activity will vary widely depending on the variety of foods offered during the LA Food Festival and the individual tastes of the students. At the next group opportunity, have students count the tally marks in each cell of the word grid and determine which foods/flavors had more marks.

 

Accommodations: Assist students with making tally marks

 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 


Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Whole Group Activity 3: Assess students’ abilities to work in a group successfully and to complete the sequencing activity accurately.

 

·         Small Group Activity 1: Assess students’ abilities to follow directions and correctly identify and use the story card appropriately.

 

Resources

Children’s Books

Berger, Melvin. Pasta, Please! ISBN: 1-56784-021-3

Buckless, Andrea. Too Many Cooks! ISBN: 0-439-16966-6

Canizares, Susan and Betsey Chessen. In the Kitchen. ISBN: 978-0-439-04586-X

Carle, Eric. The Very Hungry Caterpillar. ISBN: 0-590-03029-9

Chessen, Betsey and Pamela Chanko. Orange Juice. ISBN: 0-590-14999-7

Degan, Bruce. Jamberry. ISBN: 978-0060214166

Dooley, Norah. Everybody Cooks Rice. ISBN: 978-0876145913

Downing, Johnette. Today Is Monday in Louisiana. ISBN: 9781589804067

Ehlert, Lois. Eating the Alphabet. ISBN: 0-590-05302-7

Fleming, Candace. Gator Gumbo: A Spicy Hot Tale. ISBN: 978-0374380502

Fontenot, Mary Alice. Clovis Crawfish and Etienne Escargot. ISBN: 978-0882898261

Fontenot, Mary Alice. Clovis Crawfish and His Friends. ISBN: 978-0882894799

Hausherr, Rosmarie. What Food is This? ISBN: 0-590-46583-X

Kadair, Deborah Ousley. Grandma’s Gumbo. ISBN: 1-58980-133-4

Kadair, Deborah Ousley. There was an Ol’ Cajun. ISBN: 978-1565549173

Lindsey, Kathleen D. Sweet Potato Pie. ISBN: 978-1584300618

McGovern, Ann. Stone Soup. ISBN: 0-590-41602-2

Miranda, Anne. To Market, To Market. ISBN: 0-590-51242-0

Numeroff, Laura Joffe. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. ISBN: 0-590-40233-1

Numeroff, Laura. If You Give a Pig A Pancake. ISBN: 0-06-026686-4

Prieto, Anita. P is for Pelican: A Louisiana Alphabet. ISBN: 978-1585361373

Rey, Margret and H.A. Curious George and the Pizza. ISBN: 0-395-39033-8

Rey, Margret and H.A. Curious George Makes Pancakes. ISBN: 0-439-58908-8

Snow, Pegeen. Eat Your Peas, Louise! ISBN: 0-516-2796-9

Stoodt, Jeffrey. Pizza Pokey. ISBN: 0-8172-7250-X

Sturges, Philemon. The Little Red Hen (Makes a Pizza). ISBN: 0-439-45076-4

 

Weiss, Ellen. From Kernel to Corncob. ISBN: 978-0531187890

Weiss, Ellen. From Pit to Peach Tree. ISBN: 978-0531187913

Westcott, Nadine Bernard. Peanut Butter and Jelly. ISBN: 0-14-054852-1

Wood, Don and Audrey. The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry, and The Big Hungry Bear. ISBN: 0-590-46894-4

 

Recordings/CDs

Downing, Johnette: From the Gumbo Pot

Papillion: Cajun for Kids

Website Resources

http://www.pickyourown.org/peachpickingtips.htm

http://www.lsuagcenter.com/

http://www.kidsfarm.com/wheredo.htm

http://www.moomilk.com/

 


Unit 10-3:  Louisiana

Study Focus:  Woodland Animals

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on woodland habitats and animals in Louisiana.

Student Understandings: Students will understand the characteristics of woodland habitats. Students will understand that certain animals are commonly found in Louisiana woodlands areas.

Guiding Questions:

1.      Can students recognize woodland areas?

2.      Can students name some of the features of a woodlands area?

3.      Can students identify animals that live in woodlands areas?

4.      Can students identify characteristics of woodlands animals?

Guiding Vocabulary: woodlands, forest, woods, meadow, deer, squirrel, bear, armadillo, fox, opossum, skunk, owls, hawks, rabbit

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)


 

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)


 

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)


 

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Woodlands

Black Bears

Squirrels

Forest Animals

Forest Animals

Whole Group Activities

Introduction to Woodlands

The Bear Went Into the Woodlands

Squirrels to Tree Game

Animal Creative Movement

Playing Possum

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you ever been in a forest?

Have you seen a black bear?

Do you have squirrels in a tree at your house?

Have you ever smelled a skunk?

Have you heard an owl hoot?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography.  

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

In the Forest

 

In the Meadow

Black Bear Cub

The Squirrel

Lost in the Woods

Nature Footprints: In The Forest

Small Group Activities

Down in Louisiana
Story Chain

Home for a Bunny

Directional Words

Stinky Smells

Woodland word grid

Music and Movement

rhythm sticks to simulate the steady beat of a march or a hike

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Naturalist, Extension or County Agent, botanist, hunter to describe the woods


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations:

On construction paper, draw several trees.  Have students use spinner or die ,then count out plastic North American animals onto the trees.

 

Measurement:

Using plastic trees from the block area, have students compare and then line up from shortest to tallest.

Geometry:

Have students use geo boards to create shapes

Data Collection:

BLM Graph:

How many forest animal prints do you see?

Patterning:

Put North American animals in the sand table.  Have students choose two animals and create a footprint pattern in the sand.

Science

SCI 1,2,3,4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11,22,23,24,25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6,9,11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

pine straw, sticks and twigs, acorns to weigh using a pan balance; branches with leaves; a variety of real leaves, sticks and twigs, a measuring tape to measure the length of the sticks and twigs, plastic woodland animals; binoculars; photographs of woodland animals

 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

baton races, hula hoop rolling, hula hoop hopping, bean bag toss, limbo using sticks

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10,11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student made signs and labels

camping gear – backpack, binoculars, field guide, maps, flashlight, ice chest, compass

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9,10,11,13

SCI 9

SS 4

forest animal bingo and lotto - Use die-cuts, boardmaker, stickers, or clipart to create bingo or lotto games on cardstock which has been laminated for durability

forest animal counters and counting mats for sorting, counting, or patterning

squirrel to trees counting game - using die-cuts, stickers, clipart, or boardmaker, cut out 10 trees with the numberals 1-10 written on them. Place the correct number of squirrels on the trees.

real acorns for counting or sorting; bunny counters for pattering or counting

Feed the Bunny Fine Motor Game, tree sticks in a variety of sizes in graduated order for seriation

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/birds-of-a-feather/games/index.html

http://funschool.kaboose.com/preschool/amazing-animals/games/game_animal_tracks.html

http://funschool.kaboose.com/preschool/art-activity-center/games/game_cartoon_builder.html

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

collage created from camping brochures, magazines, clipart, or stickers, animal stamps and stencils

watercolor paint

sponge animal foot prints

pine tree branch dipped in paint for gross motor painting

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

pine straw and acorns in sand table with woodland animals

Water:

water mills and measuring cups

woodland animals, ducks and turtles

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Playing Possum, Going on a Bear Hunt, Armadillo, 5 Little Possums, Honey Jar- Johnette Downing

John the Rabbit- Spring Musikgarten

The Little Skunks Hula-50 Silly Songs for Kids Vol. 3

Rattlesnakes -Tony Chestnut,The Learning Station

In the Woods There Was a Tree, Over in the Meadow, The Beaver Call, Bear Went Over the Mountain - Dr. Jean

 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

camping prop box: binoculars for animal watching, photos of real animals, bird book/field guide, picnic basket, plastic food plates and cups, small picnic blanket, plastic food, compass, flashlight, camera, Wildlife and Fisheries guides, conservation magazines; map


 

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

nature magazines; field guides and booklets; Ranger Rick , Junior Smithsonian, National Geographic, Louisiana Sportsman magazines; names of the state parks; forests brochures

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers

stamps; stencils; word cards; woodland forest animal name cards; Louisiana camping/conservation/Naturalist magazines and booklets; names of the state parks and forests

 

 

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Introduction to Woodlands (ELA 4, 6, 8, 11, 12, 22; SCI 2, 22)

 

Materials List:  A Day in the Woods (book), dry erase board, markers

 

Using a modified DR-TA strategy (view literacy strategy descriptions) show the students the cover of the book and ask the students to predict what the story may be about.  Write their predictions on the dry erase board.  Read the book, pausing where appropriate for student comments and questions.  At the end of the read-aloud, ask the students to confirm whether the story met their predictions and the reasons for why they did or not.  Record their answers on the dry erase board.  Discuss the woodland photographs, noting the features of woodland areas and the animals that inhabit woodlands. 

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2:  The Bear Went into the Woodlands   (ELA 4, 6, 8, 22, 24; M 13; SCI 22)

 

Materials List:  Black Bear (book), dry erase board, markers, The Bear Went into the Woodlands (song)

 

Read the book and discuss the characteristics of black bears.  Discuss the manner in which bears rumble through woodland areas in search of food and shelter.  Discuss what bears might see as they move through the woodlands.  Teach the students the following song to the tune of The Bear Went Over the Mountain.

 

 

The bear went into the woodlands,

The bear went into the woodlands

To see what he could see.

And all that he could see,

And all that he could see . . .  was ___________________________________.

(Pine trees, pine cones, bumble bees, shadows, flowers, water, blackberries, honey)

A pine tree in the woodlands,

A pine tree in the woodlands

Was all that he could see.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3:  Squirrels to Tree Game   (ELA 4, 6, 10, 22; M 1, 4, 10)

 

Materials List:  Squirrels (book), number cards 1-10

                                                 

Read the book and discuss the manner in which squirrels scamper across the ground and up trees.  The teacher will stand at one end of the circle rug and play the role of the tree.  The teacher will extend both arms from her sides.  One student will hold the number card, displaying its number.  The student will then tap the number of fellow students on the head that corresponds with the number on the card.  These students then play the role of squirrels by scampering to the teacher, forming a circle around her.  Students then return to their places.  The game is repeated until all of the numbered cards have been used.

 

Accommodations:  Students may need help in identifying the numeral and counting the number of students.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4:  Animal Creative Movement   (ELA 4, 6, 9, 10, 16, 24; M 10; SCI 15, 20, 22)

 

Materials List:  Forest Animals (book), dry erase board, markers

 

Read the book, pausing to discuss the characteristics of forest animals that are depicted on each page.  Once the book has been read, have the students identify the various animals that were depicted.  List them on the dry erase board.   Also have the students identify other animals that they know to exist in the forest but were not included in the book.  List these on the dry erase board as well.  Utilizing the list, have the students stand up and

 

 

physically imitate the manner in which these animals move, e.g., soar like a hawk above the ground, lumber like a bear across the woodlands, run like a deer through the forest, climb like a squirrel up the tree, hop like a rabbit over the log, crawl like a snake along the ground.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5:  Playing Possum   (ELA 4, 8, 11; M 1, 5, 13; SCI 15, 22)

 

Materials List:  Count the Possums (book), CDs:  “Silly Songs” by Dr. Jean, “From the Gumbo Pot” by Johnette Downing

 

Read the book and discuss the actions and characteristics of a possum.  Play the song Playing Possum (Dr. Jean) and allow the students to play possum on the circle rug.  Play the song Five Little Possums (Johnette Downing) and allow the students to play along. 

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

Small Group Activities

 

Small Group Activity 1:  Down in Louisiana Story Chain   (ELA 4, 9, 11, 21, 27; M 1, 13; SCI 20, 22)

 

Materials List:  Down in Louisiana (book), ten word cards with names and pictures of the animals with numerals 1-10 (e.g., 1- pelican, 2- armadillo)

 

Read the book, pausing after each page to discuss the animal and the environment in which the animal is depicted.  Using a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions), distribute the number and word cards to ten students.  Using the song that appears at the end of the book, have the students come forward and stand in front of the class when the animal appearing on their card is sung.  Continue the song until all ten animals have been used, allowing all students to have a turn.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 2:  Home for a Bunny   (ELA 4, 8, 10, 24; M 1, 5, 10, 13)

 

Materials List:  Home for a Bunny (book), a paper cup for each student with the end cut out to simulate a rabbit hole, rabbit counters or cut-outs

 

Read the book and discuss rabbits and their homes.  Teach the following finger play to the students. 

 

 

Here is a bunny

With ears so funny.   (Hold up two fingers to simulate bunny ears)

Here is his hole in the ground.   (With your other hand, make a circle between your forefinger and thumb)

When a noise he hears,

He perks up his ears.    (Hold your fingers depicting the bunny ears erect)

And hops in his hole in the ground.    (Insert the bunny ears into the hole)

 

Once the students have learned the finger play, distribute the cups and rabbit counters.   Demonstrate to the students the manner in which the rabbit hops into his hole (this time, with the manipulatives).  Call out a number (e.g., 5) and have the students count out as five bunnies jump into the hole (i.e., the cup).

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 3:  Directional Words    (ELA 4, 8, 24; M 1, 4, 10)

 

Materials List:  Squirrels (book), a brown paper lunch bag for each student with a marker line drawn at the point the students need to stop cutting, scissors for each student, squirrel counters or cut-outs

 

Read the book and discuss squirrels and their habitats.  Hand each student a paper bag.  Instruct them to:

1)      lay the bag flat on the table

2)      use the scissors to cut strips of about an inch wide and about  one-third of the way down from the top of the bag (this will create the tree limbs)

3)      open the bag so that you can twist the bottom half of the bag together (like ringing out a washcloth) to form the trunk of the tree

4)      leave the bottom of the bag flat and intact so that the tree can stand on its own.

When completed, the paper bag should have tree limbs, a trunk, and a flat bottom to stand on. 

 

Once the tree has been constructed, have the students follow the directional words given, e.g., place squirrel counter in front of the tree, beside the tree, on the tree, behind the tree, up the tree, down the tree.  In addition, have the students use multiple squirrel counters to demonstrate the same directional words, e.g., two squirrels going around the tree, etc.

 

Accommodations:  The teacher should demonstrate the manner in which the tree is made prior to having the students attempt to make their own.  Assist students who do not understand the four steps involved in making the tree.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 4: Stinky Smells   (ELA 4, 8, 9, 16, 24; SCI 3)

 

Materials List:  Sassafras Story (book), empty film canisters, cotton balls, food items (or otherwise) that have stinky smells (e.g., soy sauce, hot sauce, onions, bell peppers, steak sauce, pickle juice), dry erase board, markers

 

Read the book discussing skunks and their aroma.  Tell the students we are going to smell some different items and see if you can guess what they are.  Hand each student a film canister that has a cotton ball dipped in one of the food items you have selected.  Ask each student to close their eyes and be ready to smell each canister as it is passed around the circle.  Once all of the students have had an opportunity to smell the canister, ask them to identify what they think the stinky smell is.  List their responses on the dry erase board.  Continue until all items have been identified.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty identifying each smell by asking leading questions that serve as hints.

 

 

Small Group Activity 5:  Woodland Animal Word Grid   (ELA 4, 6, 9, 16; M 7; SCI 20, 22, 24)

 

Materials List: Animals of the Night (book), word grid, markers, dry erase board

 

Read the book, pausing where appropriate to discuss woodland animals and their characteristics. Ask the students to name animals that inhabit woodlands. List the animals the students name on the dry erase board. Display the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions). Ask students which characteristics or attributes each animal has on the grid. Write a “y” for yes or an “n” for no for each attribute. When the grid is complete, discuss the students’ answers. Keep the grid in the classroom for reference throughout the unit.

 

WOODLAND ANIMAL WORD GRID

 

 

Fur

Feathers

Claws

Tail

Beak

Day

Night

Bear

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skunk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Squirrel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Possums

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raccoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accommodations: Assist students who are unable to name a woodland animal, an animal characteristic, or understand the word grid.

 

 

 

 

 


Sample Assessments

 

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Small Group Activity 1:  Observe and document the students’ abilities to construct the story chain.

 

·         Small Group Activity 5:  Observe and document the students’ responses to the word grid.

 

 

Resources

 

Bains, Rae. Wonders of Rivers, ISBN: 0-89375-571-0

Banks, Merry. Animals of the Night, ISBN: 0-15-300306-5

Biel, Timothy Levi. ZooBooks: Skunks and Their Relatives, ISBN: 937934-38-0

Biel, Timothy Levi. ZooBooks: The Deer Family, ISBN: 937934-37-2

Boundy, Jeff. Snakes of Louisiana, Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries

Brett, Jan. Annie and the Wild Animals, ISBN: 0-395-51006-6

Brett, Jan. Armadillo Rodeo, ISBN: 0-590-22298-8

Brown, Janet Allison. Bailey Bunny’s Bright Moon, ISBN: 1-932209-42-5

Brown, Margaret Wise. Fox Eyes, ISBN: 0-394-83116-0

Brown, Margaret Wise. Home for a Bunny, ISBN: 0-307-10388-9

Carter, Anne. Molly in Danger, ISBN: 517-56534-X

Cowley, Joy. Silly Old Possum, ISBN: 1-55911-155-0

Cox, Daniel J. Black Bear, ISBN: 0-87701-684-4

Day, Jennifer W. What Is a Bird?, ISBN: 0-307-61805-6

Di Blasi, Lidia and Nuria Roca. I Am a Big Snake, ISBN: 0-7647-5443-5

Disney, Walt. Bambi, ISBN: 0-7172-8711-4

Disney, Walt. Story of Bambi

Fisher, Ronald M. A Day in the Woods, ISBN: 0-87044-169-8

Fleming, Denise. In The Small, Small Pond, ISBN: 0-8050-2264-3

Fleming, Denise. Time to Sleep, ISBN: 0-590-00525-1

Fleming, Denise. Where Once There Was a Forest, ISBN: 0-590-93807-X

Gise, Joanne. Birds, ISBN: 0-8167-1899-7

Gise, Joanne. Forest Animals, ISBN: 0-8167-1905-5

Gree, Alain and Luis Camps. Ollie the Owl, ISBN: 0-516-08325-2

Gree, Alain and Luis Camps. Wally the Woodpecker, ISBN: 0-517-65302-8

Greenberg, David T. Skunks, ISBN: 0-316-32606-2

Herkert, Barbara. Birds in Your Backyard, ISBN: 1-58469-025-9

Hirschi, Ron. Forest, ISBN: 0-553-07469-5

Hogan, Paula Z. The Life Cycle of the Frog, ISBN: 0-8172-1253-1

Hooker, Yvonne. One Green Frog, ISBN: 0-448-21031-2

Hutchins, Pat. Goodnight Owl, ISBN 10: 0-689-71371-1

Keats, Ezra Jack. Over in the Meadow, ISBN:

Kostyal, K. M. Raccoons, ISBN: 0-87044-677-0

Lane, Margaret. The Fox, ISBN: 0-8037-2491-8

Lane, Margaret. The Squirrel, ISBN: 0-14-054926-9

Lepthien, Emilie U. Squirrels, ISBN: 0-516-41947-1

Lesser, Carolyn. The Goodnight Circle, ISBN: 0-15-232159-4

Lind, Alan. Black Bear Cub, ISBN: 0-590-85291-4

Marzollo, Jean. Once Upon a Springtime, ISBN: 0-590-46017-X

Milbourne, Anna. In The Nest, ISBN: 0-7945-0735-2

Moreton, Daniel. Snakes and Lizards, ISBN: 0-590-63900-5

Oppenheim, Joanne. Have You Seen Birds?, ISBN: 0-590-40890-9

Pascoe, Elaine. How and Why Birds Build Nests, ISBN: 1-57471-656-5

Pearce, Q. L. and W. J. Pearce. Nature Footprints: In the Forest, ISBN: 0-671-68830-8

Pedler, Caroline. Kind Little Bear, ISBN: 1-40544-486-X

Penn, Audrey. Sassafras Story, ISBN: 0-590-04703-5

Phister, Marcus. The Sleepy Owl, ISBN: 0-590-39667-6

Poitier, Anton. Who Am I in the Dark?, ISBN-13: 978-0-7607-6733-7

Punnett, Dick. Count The Possums, ISBN: 0-89565-215-3

Rey, Margret, and H. A. Curious George Goes Camping, ISBN: 0-439-18826-1

Ross, Katharine. The Baby Animals’ Party, ISBN: 0-394-87355-6

Roza, Greg. Big Black Bears, ISBN: 0-8239-8100-2

Sadoway, Margaret Wheeler. Owls: Hunters of the Night, ISBN: 0-8225-0293-3

Sams, Carl R. and Jean Stoick. Lost in the Wood, ISBN: 0-967-1748-8-0

Schwartz, David M. Life Cycles: Green Snakes, ISBN: 1-57471-557-7

Schwartz, David M. Life Cycles: Wood Frog, ISBN: 1-57471-552-6

Schwartz, David M. Look Once, Look Again: In a Tree, ISBN: 1-57471-219-5

Schwartz, David M. Look Once, Look Again: In the Forest, ISBN: 1-57471-218-7

Schwartz, David M. Look Once, Look Again: In the Meadow, ISBN: 1-57471-213-6

Smee, Nicola. Little Duckling

Smee, Nicola. Little Rabbit, ISBN:

Swinburne, Stephen. Black Bear, ISBN: 1-59078-023-X

Thaler, Mike. Owly, ISBN: 0-06-026151-X

Ward, Lorraine. A Walk in the Wild, ISBN: 0-88106-478-5

Wexo, John Bonnett. ZooBooks: Night Animals, ISBN: 0-937934-26-7

Wildsmith, Brian. Squirrels, ISBN: 0-590-20440-8

Wildsmith, Brian. The Lazy Bear, ISBN: 0-15-304270-2

Williams, Rozanne Lanczak. Who Lives Here?, ISBN: 0-916119-37-8

Williams, Rozanne Lanczak. Whose Forest Is It?, ISBN: 0-916119-29-7

 

 

Recordings/CDs

 

Dr. Jean. Just For Fun!

Dr. Jean. Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs

Johnette Downing. From the Gumbo Pot

Johnette Downing. Music Time

Johnette Downing. Silly Sing Along

Spring Musikgarten

50 Silly Songs for Kids, Vol. 3

 

 

Website Resources

 

LPB (Louisiana Public Broadcasting) Cyberchannel: Jeff Corwin Experience: Louisiana: Swampy Ecosystem

 

Louisiana State Parks – www.crt.state.la.us/parks/

   -brochure requests link

   -Kids’ Webpage link—matching animal tracks game

 


Unit 10-4:  Louisiana

Study Focus:  Insects and Creepy Crawlies (week 1 of 2)

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on the characteristics and habits of insects, arachnids, and invertebrates.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that insects have specific, identifiable characteristics. Students will understand that arachnids and invertebrates are not insects.

Guiding Questions:

1.      Can students identify the characteristics of an insect?

2.      Can students name some insects by their common names?

3.      Can students identify the physical characteristics of arachnids and invertebrates?

4.      Can students recognize the importance of insects in our ecosystem?

Guiding Vocabulary: insect, arachnid, invertebrate, thorax, abdomen, head, antennae, wing, life cycle, metamorphosis, chrysalis, cocoon, web, spinnerets, entomologist

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)


 

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where) (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)


 

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)


 

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)


 

 Study Focus

 

What is an insect?

Ladybugs

Caterpillars & Butterflies

Earthworms

Honeybees

Whole Group Activities

Word Grid:

Characteristics of an Insect

ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 29, 31, SCI 5

DR-TA

Are You a Ladybug?

ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 22, 26, 27, 29, 31, M 2, SCI 1, 2, 5, 22

Story Chain

I Am A Caterpillar

ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b, 12c, 21, 22, 23, 24, M 3, SCI 5, 22, 24

DR-TA

Diary of a Worm

ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 5d, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 22, 26, 27, 29, 31, M 2, 13, SCI 1, 2, 5, 22, 23, 24

KWL:

Busy As a Bee

ELA 1d, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14c, 16, 18, 21, SCI 1, 2, 5, 22

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Do you like bugs?

Would you hold a ladybug?

Would you hold a caterpillar?

Have you ever caught an earthworm?

Have you ever tasted honey?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography.  

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Bug Safari

The Very Grouchy Ladybug

A Butterfly Is Born

Inch by Inch

Are You a Bee?

Small Group Activities

Bug Hunt

ELA 17, 20, 21, 22, 24, SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 24

Ladybug observation

Learning Log

ELA 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 24, 26, SCI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 24

Caterpillar observation

Learning Log

ELA 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 24, 26, SCI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 24

Worm measuring

Learning Log

ELA 4, 21, 22, 24, 26, M 6

Patterning: Honeybee stripes

ELA 4, 21, 24, M 13

Music and Movement

“buggy” movements to music: hop, crawl, fly

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

bug hunt around the school grounds; local beekeeper; local university entomologist


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Plastic container to catch bugs, Easter grass, and plastic bug counters.  Put Easter grass in a small tub and hide the bugs in the grass. Have students find bugs and put in the plastic container. When they have found all the bugs, have students count them.

Measurement

BLM Butterfly Comparisons.  Compare the wing span of different butterflies.

Geometry

Use attribute shapes/ pattern blocks to make different insects.

Data Collection

BLM Graph: How many insects did you hold in your hand?

Patterning

 BLM: Use plastic insect counters to copy, extend, or create patterns.

Science

SCI 1,2,3,4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11,22,23,24,25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26,31

M 6,9,11,

SS 4

learning logs and  writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

insect specimen (live if possible): ladybugs, ant farm, caterpillars, worm farm, etc.

magnifying glasses

children’s microscope such as the GeoSafari Talking Microscope

photos of insects

“bugs’ eye” viewers

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

bean bag bugs and a basket or bucket to play a tossing game;

move like bugs: crawl, slither, hop, fly


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10,11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

large plastic bugs; berry baskets for “cages”

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9,10,11,13

SCI 9

SS 4

small plastic bugs for counting games such as ants and picnic baskets, butterflies and nets, or ladybugs and leaves

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/creepy-crawlies/games/index.html

http://prongo.com/match/bugs.pl

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

Red and black paint; yellow and black paint; paper plate ladybugs; bug sculpture with clay, pipe stems, craft sticks, egg cartons, tissue paper, etc.

Bug shaped sponge painting

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

substitute sand for Easter grass; add plastic bugs, tongs or small nets for catching bugs

 

Water:

fishing worms and small nets

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Insect Body – Dr. Jean; Walter the Waltzing Worm, Flick a Fly –Hap Palmer; Spider on the Floor - Raffi; Wiggle Worms – Johnette Downing; Fireflies – Anna Moo; Itsy Bitsy Spider, Itsy Bitsy Spider Rock – Jack Hartmann


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

insect wings (butterfly, ladybug, honeybee); entomologist research lab: lab coats, plastic bugs, magnifying glasses, specimen cups, microscope

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools, such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers

bug stamps; bug shaped notepads

 


 

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Is it an Insect? (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 29, 31; SCI 5)

 

Materials List: poster(s) of insects – include at least one with a description of the body parts of an insect, selection of nonfiction books about various insects, several large plastic insects, vis-à-vis pen, word grid on poster board

 

Prior to the lesson, create a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) similar to the one below and laminate it for durability.

 

 

3 body parts?

(head, thorax, abdomen)

 

6 legs?

Detail of insect wings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wings?

 

 

 

Antennae?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is it an insect?

Ladybug

 

 

 

 

 

Butterfly

 

 

 

 

 

Earthworm

 

 

 

 

 

Honeybee

 

 

 

 

 

Spider

 

 

 

 

 

Firefly

 

 

 

 

 

Ant

 

 

 

 

 

Cricket

 

 

 

 

 

Fly

 

 

 

 

 

 

Display the posters, books, and plastic insects. Ask students to predict what they will be learning about for the next two weeks. Encourage students to share ideas and thoughts about insects and other “creepy crawlies” with the class. Point out the body parts of the insects on the posters and the plastic insects. Display the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) and explain that each day the class will learn about one of the bugs listed in the left-hand column of the grid. Read each of the bug names while pointing to each one. Explain that insects are often called bugs, but for it to be a true insect, the bug must have the following: read off the top row of questions/criteria for insects found at the top of the word grid. Show students the plastic bugs and ask them if they think all of them are insects. Why or why not? Divide the class into 4 or 5 groups. Give each group one of the plastic insects to examine. Using a vis-à-vis marker, have each group answer the questions on the word grid and identify their bug as an insect or not an insect. Tell students that they will use the word grid every day as the class learns more about bugs. Place the word grid in a prominent location in the classroom.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Are You A Ladybug? (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 22, 26, 27, 29, 31; M 2; SCI 1, 2, 5, 22)

 

Materials List: Are You A Ladybug? (book), large plastic ladybug, real ladybugs, word grid chart from activity 1, vis-à-vis marker

 

Open with poem:        Ladybug, ladybug!

                                                Fly away home.

                                                Your house is on fire

                                                And your children all gone.

                                                All except one,

                                                And that’s little Ann,

                                                For she has crept under

                                                The frying pan.                

 

Introduce the book, Are You A Ladybug?. Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), ask students what they believe the book will be about. Write these predictions on the board or chart paper. Read the text aloud, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions. After the reading, go over the predictions written down before reading and ask students if the book was what they expected. Did they learn any new information about ladybugs? Encourage students to look at the ladybug model and/or the real ladybugs and compare them to the illustrations in the book. Ask students to check the word grid from the previous day’s lesson and answer the questions about ladybugs. Do ladybugs have 3 body parts? Do ladybugs have 6 legs? Do ladybugs have wings? Do ladybugs have antennae? Are ladybugs insects?

 

 

Place the plastic ladybug and real ladybugs in the science center for students to examine during centers.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: I Am A Caterpillar (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b, 12c, 21, 22, 23, 24; M 3; SCI 5, 22, 24)

 

Materials List: I Am A Caterpillar (book), plastic caterpillars and butterflies, live caterpillars, pictures of caterpillar to butterfly metamorphosis: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/butterflies/lifecycle/

 

Prior to the lesson, prepare metamorphosis cards on cardstock and laminate for durability.

 

Open the lesson by displaying the live caterpillars for students to examine. Discuss the appearance of the caterpillars and what they are doing (usually eating!). Display the plastic caterpillars and butterflies. Ask students if they know why the caterpillars go with the butterflies. Read the book, I Am A Caterpillar, aloud to the class. Pause where appropriate for questions and comments about the book. After reading the book, explain to students that they are going to create a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) of the life cycle of the butterfly using the metamorphosis pictures. Divide the class into groups. Give each group one of the metamorphosis pictures. Encourage the groups to look at their pictures and figure out which one comes first, second, third, and fourth in the story chain. Have each group come forward to hang their picture card (taped to the board, hung on a clothesline, etc.) in the correct sequence and describe what is happening at that stage of the butterfly. Close by reviewing the story chain sequence.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4: Diary of a Worm (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 5d, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 22, 26, 27, 29, 31; M 2, 13; SCI 1, 2, 5, 22, 23, 24)

 

Materials List: Diary of a Worm (book), word grid from day 1, vis-à-vis marker, live earthworms (can be purchased at bait stands or pet stores), Herman the Worm song from Mr. Al’s Math in Motion CD

 

Prior to the lesson, put the live earthworms in a tub with a shallow layer of soil.

 

Play/sing Herman the Worm:

I was sitting on the fence post (slap knees)
I was chewing on my bubble gum (chomp, chomp, chomp, chomp)
Playing with my yo-yo (up and down with hands)
Doo-wop, doo-wop (continue yo-yo motion)

When along came Herman the worm yeah (worm motion with hands)
and he was.....
1 inch (verse 1) (measure with hands)
6 inches (verse 2)
1 foot (verse 3)
2 feet (verse 4)

And I said "Herman what happened?"

And Herman said "Duuuuuhhhh, I swallowed a..."
bug in a rug (verse 1)
mouse in the house (verse 2)
kitty cat, imagine that (verse 3)
puppy dog, what a hog (verse 4)

Oh Herman!!!

And Herman just crawled away like this
crawling fingers - (verse 1)
crawling hand - (verse 2)
crawling arms & hand - (verse 3)
whole body - (verse 4)

Last verse:
And he was three feet...
No, he was two feet...
No, he was 1 inch.

And I said "Herman what happened?"

And Herman said"Duuuhhh, I burped!"
Oh Herman!!!!

 

 

Ask students if they have ever seen an earthworm. Pause for student responses. Display the front cover of the book, asking students to look at the illustrations and title as you point to each and read the title aloud. Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), elicit student predictions about the story based on their observation of the front cover and the title of the book and write them on the board or chart paper. Read the

story aloud, following the left to right sweep of the text and pausing where appropriate for comments and questions about the story. Afterward, go over the predictions about the story and ask students if they were correct. Display the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) from the first lesson. Ask students to complete the word grid for ladybugs (if not done previously) and for earthworms. To close, show students the live earthworms and explain that they are being placed in the science center for observation.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5: Busy as a Bee (GLEs: ELA 1d, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14c, 16, 18, 21; SCI 1, 2, 5, 22)

 

Materials List: chart paper, markers (3 colors), Busy as a Bee (book), honey, craft sticks

 

Open by reciting:                    Here is a beehive (make a fist)

                                                Where are the bees? (pretend to look around for them)

                                                Hiding inside (try to see inside the beehive)

                                                Where nobody sees!

 

                                                Soon they come creeping (unlock fist slowly)

                                                Out of the hive.

                                                One, two, three, four, five!

 

Show students the honey and ask where they believe the honey comes from. To create a graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions) in the form of a KWL chart, write the word “Bees” at the top of the chart paper being sure to identify each letter as it’s written and reading the word aloud. Divide the chart paper into 3 sections. Write the word “Know” in the first section, “Wonder” in the second section, and “Learned” in the third section. Read each letter and word as they are written, explaining to students that you are going to write what they already know about bees in the first section of the chart and what they wonder about bees in the second section. Explain that after the book is read, you will record what they learned about bees in the last section of the chart. Encourage students to think about bees and tell you what they know about them. Record their responses in the “Know” section of the chart. Guide students to wonder about bees and write their questions or “I wonders” on the “Wonder” section of the chart. Read the book, Busy as a Bee, aloud to the class, pausing where appropriate for questions and comments. Be sure to note where students’ questions or wonderings are answered in the text. Following the reading, ask students what they learned from the book and record their responses on the “Learned” section of the chart. Post the chart where students can refer to it in the future. To close, offer students who wish to taste the honey an


 

opportunity to do so by providing a craft stick to each student. Students may dip their craft stick into the honey one time then taste the honey from the stick. Supervise this activity carefully to prevent double dipping!

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Small Groups

 

Small Group Activity 1: Bug Hunt (GLEs: ELA 17, 20, 21, 22, 24; SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 24)

 

Materials List: paper and clipboards for each student, crayons/colored pencils/markers, magnifying glasses, digital camera, clear containers with vented lids for each group

 

Give each student in the group a clipboard with paper, writing utensils, and a magnifying glass. Explain that they are going to use these items to work as a group to find one or more bug, observe the bugs they find, record their observations by drawing or writing about the bugs, and possibly collecting a specimen to share with the rest of the class. Explain where they are allowed to look for insects or other small creatures and set down safety rules based on your individual situation. Encourage students to work together as a group rather than dividing up as they hunt for insects to observe. Once a likely specimen is located, encourage students to use the magnifying glasses to look carefully at the insect in its natural habitat. Have students draw/write about what they see, giving assistance and encouragement where needed. Use the digital camera to take pictures of the students working and of the insects they find. If they find an insect or spider that would be safe to collect, help students gather the specimen and put it into a container. Be sure students understand that the insect will be released once the class has had time to observe it. Release all specimen by the end of the day. Repeat this process until all the students have had an opportunity to participate. This may take place over several days.

 

Accommodations: Provide additional supervision for students having difficulty working in groups; assist students with motor challenges by hunting in an area that is handicap accessible

 

 

Small Group Activity 2: Ladybug Observations (GLEs: ELA 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 24, 26; SCI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 24)

 

Materials List: blank paper, writing utensils such as crayons, markers, or colored pencils, live ladybugs, magnifying glasses

 

Put the live ladybugs into a transparent covered container such as a covered aquarium, large jars, or commercially available ladybug farm. Make the ladybug filled container(s) available to students in the science center of the classroom. Provide each student with a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions) page to record his/her observations of the ladybugs. Encourage students to use the magnifying glasses to get a better look at the ladybugs. Ask students questions such as:         

·    What do you notice about the ladybugs’ bodies?

·    How many dots can you count on the ladybug’s back?

·    Can you see the ladybug’s wings? Do you remember where they are hidden?

·    Why do gardeners like ladybugs? Can you remember what they like to eat?

·    Have you ever seen a ladybug outside? What did you do?

 

Have students draw/write their observations of the ladybugs on their learning log page. Once all students have completed their pages, assemble them into a class journal (book) or place them into the students’ portfolios as a work sample.

 

Accommodations: Encourage students who are hesitant to write or draw their observations by providing a variety of different writing utensils and by giving them prompts to get them started.

 

 

Small Group Activity 3: Caterpillar Observation (GLEs: ELA 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 24, 26; SCI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 24)

 

Materials List: blank paper, writing utensils such as crayons, markers, or colored pencils, live caterpillars, magnifying glasses

 

Put the live caterpillars into a transparent covered container such as a covered aquarium, large jars, or commercially available caterpillars in a cup. Make the caterpillar filled container(s) available to students in the science center of the classroom. Provide each student with a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions) page to record his/her observations of the caterpillars. Encourage students to use the magnifying glasses to get a better look at the caterpillars. Ask students questions such as:

·    What do you notice about the caterpillars?

·    What are the caterpillars eating?

·    Why do the caterpillars eat so much?

·    What will the caterpillars do next?

·    What do you think they will look like when they come out of their chrysalides?

·    Have you ever seen a caterpillar outside? What did you do?

 

Have students draw/write their observations of the caterpillars on their learning log page. Once all students have completed their pages, assemble them into a class journal (book) or place them into the students’ portfolios as a work sample.

 

Accommodations: Encourage students who are hesitant to write or draw their observations by providing a variety of different writing utensils and by giving them prompts to get them started.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 4: Worm Measuring (GLEs: ELA 4, 21, 22, 24, 26, M 6)

 

Materials List: playdough, rulers, blank paper, crayons/markers/colored pencils

 

Give each student a portion of playdough. Have students make “worms” with the playdough, then measure their worm or worms with the rulers. Show students how to place the ruler alongside the playdough worm, matching one end of the “worm” with the end of the ruler. Show students the numbers along the edge of the ruler and explain that these numbers show inches. Encourage students to line up the rulers correctly and figure out how long their worms are. Explain that they will now record their findings on a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions) page. Have each student lay his/her worm on the paper and trace around it to illustrate the page. Write on each student’s paper _____’s worm is __ inches long, filling in the blanks according to student names and actual measurement of the playdough worm made by the student.

 

Accommodations: Assist students with accurately using rulers and recording the correct measurement.

 

 

Small Group Activity 5: Patterning – Honeybee Stripes (GLEs: ELA 4, 21, 24; M 13)

 

Materials List: black and yellow finger paint, optional: white paper

 

Invite students to come to the art center to finger paint. Ask students to create honeybee stripes with the black and yellow finger paints. Have students read the pattern aloud. If desired, you may want to create a print of each student’s painting by pressing a piece of white paper down on the finger paint.

 

Accommodations: May use brushes to accommodate students with sensory issues.

 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Ladybug Observation Learning Log: Collect originals or make copies to be placed in the portfolio.

 

·         Worm Measurement Learning Log: Collect originals or make copies to be placed in the portfolio.

Resources

Children’s Books

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You an Ant? ISBN: 0-7534-5365-7

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Bee? ISBN: 0-7534-5345-2

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Butterfly? ISBN: 0-7534-5240-5

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Dragonfly? ISBN: 0-7534-5805-5

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Grasshopper? ISBN: 0-7534-5806-3

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Ladybug? ISBN: 0-7534-5241-7

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Snail? ISBN: 0-7534-5604-4

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Spider? ISBN: 0-7534-5243-X

Barner, Bob. Bugs, Bugs, Bugs! ISBN: 0-439-17208-X

Barner, Bob. Bug Safari. ISBN: 0-439-74876-3

Bauer, Jeff. Butterfly Life Cycle. ISBN: 978-0-439-87652-0

Berger, Melvin. A Butterfly is Born. ISBN: 1-56784-012-4

Berger, Melvin. Busy As a Bee. ISBN: 1-56784-101-5

Berger, Melvin. The World of Ants. ISBN: 1-56784-008-6

Brenner, Barbara. Thinking About Ants. ISBN: 0-439-50109-1

Brinckloe, Julie. Fireflies! ISBN: 0-689-71055-0

Canizares, Susan. Butterfly. ISBN: 0-590-76160-9

Canizares, Susan and Pamela Chanko. What Do Insects Do? ISBN: 0-590-39794-X

Canizares, Susan and Mary Reid. Where Do Insects Live? ISBN: 0-590-39793-1

Carle, Eric. The Grouchy Ladybug. ISBN: 0-06-027087-X

Carle, Eric. The Very Busy Spider. ISBN: 0399211667

Carle, Eric. The Very Hungry Caterpillar. ISBN: 0-399-20853-4

Carle, Eric. The Very Lonely Firefly. ISBN: 978-0399227745

Carle, Eric. The Very Quiet Cricket. ISBN: 978-0399218859

Cassie, Brian and Jerry Pallotta and Mark Astrella. The Butterfly Alphabet Book. ISBN: 0-88106-894-2

Cronin, Doreen. Diary of a Worm. ISBN: 0-439-69234-2

Fleming, Denise. In the Tall, Tall Grass. ISBN: 0-590-46104-4

Fowler, Allan. It’s a Good Thing There are Insects. ISBN: 0-516-44905-2

Hawes, Judy. Fireflies in the Night. ISBN: 0-06-445101-1

Hoberman, Mary Ann. The Eensy-Weensy Spider. ISBN: 0-430-29516-5

Jeunesse, Gallimard and Sylvaine Peyrols. The Ladybug and Other Insects. ISBN: 0-439-54616-8

Kirk, David. Miss Spider’s Tea Party. ISBN: 0-590-47725-0

Lakeshore Learning. Creepy Crawlers! ISBN: 1-58970-415-0

Lionni, Leo. Inch by Inch. ISBN: 0-688-13283-9

Martin, Justin McCory. Ladybug Life Cycle. ISBN: 978-0-439-87656-8

Marzollo, Jean. I’m a Caterpillar. ISBN: 0-590-66712-2                               

Maynard, Christopher. Incredible Mini-Beasts. ISBN: 1-56458-554-9

Murphy, Stuart J. The Best Bug Parade. ISBN: 0-06-446700-7

Pallotta, Jerry. The Butterfly Counting Book. ISBN: 0-590-04938-0

Pallotta, Jerry. The Icky Bug Alphabet Book. ISBN: 0-88106-450-5                                     

Parker, John. I Love Spiders. ISBN: 0-590-47807-9

Parker, Nancy Winslow and Joan Richards Wright. Bugs. ISBN: 0-590-44478-6

Posada, Mia. Ladybugs: Red, Fiery, and Bright. ISBN: 0-87614-334-6

Reid, Mary and Betsey Chessen. Bugs, Bugs, Bugs! ISBN: 0-590-39792-3

Rice, Dona Herweck. The Life of a Butterfly. ISBN: 0-7439-8518-4

Rice, Dona Herweck. Busy Bees. ISBN: 0-7439-8520-6

Sandved, Kjell B. The Butterfly Alphabet Book. ISBN: 0-439-07947-0

Schwartz, David M. Underfoot. ISBN: 1-57471-210-1

Singer, Marilyn. A Wasp Is Not a Bee. ISBN: 0-590-13904-5

Taback, Simms. There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. ISBN: 978-0670869398

Trumbauer, Lisa. Spinning a Web. ISBN: 1-56784-312-3

Watts, Barrie. Ladybug. ISBN: 0-382-09960-5

Wildsmith, Brian and Rebecca. Look Closer. ISBN: 0-590-47835-4

Recordings/CDs

Anna Moo: Crackers by Anna Moo

Dr. Jean: Kiss your Brain

Hap Palmer: Walter the Waltzing Worm

Jack Hartman: Rhyming to Read & Word Fiesta

Johnette Downing:

Mr. Al: Math in Motion

Raffi: More Singable Songs for the Very Young

Website Resources

http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/worms/index.html

http://lifecycle.onenessbecomesus.com/

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/butterflies/lifecycle/

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/critter/insect/index.htm

http://www.preschooleducation.com/sbug.shtml


Unit 10-4:  Louisiana

Study Focus:  Insects and Creepy Crawlies (week 2 of 2)

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on the characteristics and habits of insects, arachnids, and invertebrates.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that insects have specific, identifiable characteristics. Students will understand that arachnids and invertebrates are not insects.

Guiding Questions:

1.      Can students identify the characteristics of an insect?

2.      Can students name some insects by their common names?

3.      Can students identify the physical characteristics of arachnids and invertebrates?

4.      Can students recognize the importance of insects in our ecosystem?

Guiding Vocabulary: insect, arachnid, invertebrate, thorax, abdomen, head, antennae, wing, life cycle, metamorphosis, chrysalis, cocoon, web, spinnerets, entomologist

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)


 

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)


 

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-12

Determine whether one object weighs more or less than another by using a pan balance (PK-CS-I4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)


 

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)


 

 Study Focus

 

Spiders

Fireflies

Ants

Crickets

Flies

Whole Group Activities

DR-TA

The Very Busy Spider

ELA 1a, 1d, 4, 5a, 9, 10, 12b, 12c, 21, 22, 26, 29, 31, M 10, 11, 13

DR-TA

The Very Lonely Firefly

ELA 1a, 1d, 4, 5a, 9, 10, 12b, 12c, 21, 22, 26, 29, 31

KWL

The World of Ants

ELA 3b, 4, 8, 9, 10, 16, 21, 22, 24, 26, 29, 31, SCI 1, 22, 24

DR-TA

The Very Quiet Cricket

ELA 4, 9, 12b, 12c, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 31, SCI 3, 22, 23

Story Chain

There Was an Old Woman Who Swallowed a Fly

ELA 12a, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31 M 3

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Do you like spiders?

Have you ever caught a firefly?

Do you like ants?

Have you ever heard a cricket?

Did you ever swat a fly?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography.  

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Spinning a Web

Fireflies in the Night by Judy Hawes

Thinking About Ants

The Icky Bug Alphabet Book

Miss Spider’s Tea Party

Small Group Activities

Spider Webs

ELA 21, 23, 24, M 10, SCI 2, 24

Color Seriation

ELA 21, 22, 24, M 3, 6, 9

Weight Lifters

ELA 21, 22, 24, M 6, SCI 3, 4, 11, 12

Word Grid

How do they move?

ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 31, M 12, SCI 24, SS 4

Learning Log:

My Favorite Bug

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 21, 22, 24, 26, SCI 20, 24

Music and Movement

Insect Body – Dr. Jean; Walter the Waltzing Worm, Flick a Fly –Hap Palmer; Spider on the Floor - Raffi; Wiggle Worms – Johnette Downing; Fireflies – Anna Moo; Itsy Bitsy Spider, Itsy Bitsy Spider Rock – Jack Hartmann

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

bug hunt around the school grounds; local beekeeper; local university entomologist


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Use a piece of blue construction paper for sky, spinner or die and mini butterfly die-cuts.  Have students use the spinner or die, then count out the correct number of butterflies in the sky.

 

Measurement

With assistance from the teacher, have students put one earthworm on a piece of paper and one earthworm on a piece of wax paper. Have students compare how far they move on each type of paper.

Geometry

Use construction paper triangle shapes to make different butterflies

Data Collection

BLM: Butterfly graph

Patterning

BLM: Butterfly patterns

Science

SCI 1,2,3,4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

insect specimen (live if possible): ladybugs, ant farm, caterpillars, worm farm, etc.

magnifying glasses

children’s microscope such as the GeoSafari Talking Microscope

photos of insects

 “bugs’ eye” viewers

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

bean bag bugs and a basket or bucket to play a tossing game;

move like bugs: crawl, slither, hop, fly


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student-made signs and labels

large plastic bugs; berry baskets for “cages”

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

small plastic bugs for counting games such as ants & picnic baskets or butterflies & nets or ladybugs & leaves

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://funschool.kaboose.com/formula-fusion/creepy-crawlies/games/index.html

http://prongo.com/match/bugs.pl

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

red and black paint; yellow and black paint; paper plate ladybugs; bug sculpture with clay, pipe stems, craft sticks, egg cartons, tissue paper, etc.

bug-shaped sponge painting

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

substitute sand for Easter grass; add plastic bugs, tongs or small nets for catching bugs

 

Water:

fishing worms and small nets

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Insect Body – Dr. Jean; Walter the Waltzing Worm, Flick a Fly –Hap Palmer; Spider on the Floor - Raffi; Wiggle Worms – Johnette Downing; Fireflies – Anna Moo; Itsy Bitsy Spider, Itsy Bitsy Spider Rock – Jack Hartmann


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

Insect wings (butterfly, ladybug, honeybee); entomologist research lab: lab coats, plastic bugs, magnifying glasses, specimen cups, microscope

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools, such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

bug stamps; bug shaped notepads

 

 

Whole Group

 

Whole Group Activity 1: The Very Busy Spider (GLEs: ELA 1a, 1d, 4, 5a, 9, 10, 12b, 12c, 21, 22, 26, 29, 31; M 10, 11, 13)

 

Materials List: The Very Busy Spider (book), The Itsy Bitsy Spider (book), large ball of white yarn, black bulletin board paper, word grid from day one of the previous week

 

Prior to the lesson: Create a large circle with the black bulletin board paper by laying lengths of the paper next to one another and taping it, thereby making a large square shape. Make it large enough for all students to sit around it comfortably. Then cut the corners off the square to make a circle. Cut out the center of the circle, leaving a 3 – 4 inch border of black paper. The resulting ring of black paper should be large enough for all students to sit around it.

 

Open by singing/acting out “The Itsy Bitsy Spider” song. Ask students if they have ever seen a spider and briefly allow students to share personal stories about spiders. Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), display the book and ask students to make predictions about the


 

story. Read the story aloud, pausing where appropriate for questions, comments and to ask students if they still think the story matches their predictions. At the end of the story, discuss how well student predictions matched the actual story. What was different from what they expected? What was the same? Show students the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) begun on day one of the previous week. Complete the word grid row for spiders and help students determine if a spider is an insect. Inform students that a spider is actually an arachnid. Have students sit in a circle and place the black paper ring in the middle of the circle. Show students the ball of yarn. Explain that we are going to use the yarn to pretend that we are making a web just like a spider’s web. Have students sit in a circle. Tape the loose end of the yarn down on the paper circle then roll the yarn ball across to a student on the opposite side of the group. Tape the yarn down on the circle then have that student hold onto the yarn then roll the yarn ball across the circle to another student. Repeat this process until the yarn is taped down in front of each student and there is a large “web” of yarn criss crossed across the middle of the circle. Close by singing “The Itsy Bitsy Spider” again. Display the student created “web” in the classroom.

 

Accommodations: Assist students with taping the yarn and rolling it to another student.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: The Very Lonely Firefly (GLEs: ELA 1a, 1d, 4, 5a, 9, 10, 12b, 12c, 21, 22, 26, 29, 31)

 

Materials List: The Very Lonely Firefly (book), word grid from day one of the previous week, I’m a Little Firefly (song)

 

Open with the song:    I’m a Little Firefly

                                                (sung to the tune of “I’m a Little Teapot”)

I'm a little firefly
Look at me!
I'm as happy as I can be.
See my light flicker and shine so bright
Now watch me fly into the night!

Ask students if they have seen or caught fireflies. Allow a brief amount of time for students to share personal experiences with fireflies. Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), show students the cover of the book The Very Lonely Firefly and ask them to predict what they believe the story will be about and write it on the board or chart paper. Read the story aloud, pausing often for comments, questions and to allow students to revise their predictions about the story outcome. After reading the story, go over their predictions and ask students if the story were what they were expecting. Ask students what was surprising or unexpected about the story. Using the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) from day one of the previous week, assist students in completing the row about fireflies. Help students determine from the word grid if a firefly is an insect. Close by singing the song I’m a Little Firefly.

Accommodations:  None needed


 

Whole Group Activity 3: The World of Ants (GLEs: ELA 3b, 4, 8, 9, 10, 16, 21, 22, 24, 26, 29, 31; SCI 1, 22, 24)

Materials List: The World of Ants (book), chart paper, markers, word grid from day one of week one, Ant Hill (fingerplay)

Open with the fingerplay:

Ant Hill

Once I saw an ant hill with no ants about (fingers curled under, concealed)
So I said, "Dear little ants, won't you come out?"
Then, as if the little ants had heard my call,
One, two, three, four, five come out? (as numbers are called, fingers are extended)
And that was all!

Create a graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions) in the form of a KWL chart, by writing the word “Ants” at the top of the chart paper and dividing the paper into 3 separate sections. Write the word “Know” at the top of the first section. Write the word “Wonder” at the top of the second section. Write the word “Learned” at the top of the third section. As each letter is written, say it out loud for the students, then read the words aloud. Ask students to share what they know about ants and write their responses in the “Know” section of the chart. Encourage students to also think about what they don’t know about ants and formulate questions or “I wonder” statements for the “Wonder” section of the KWL. Display the book The World of Ants. Tell students they should listen to find out the answers to their questions or “I wonder” statements as the text is read aloud. Remind them that they may also learn something new about ants they did not wonder about. Read the book aloud, pausing often for questions, comments and to point out the answers to questions on the KWL. After reading the book, ask students to share what they learned about ants and write their statements in the “Learned” section of the chart. Review the chart by going over the three sections, recalling what they know and pointing out the connections between what they wondered about and what they learned from the book. Point out the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) from previous lessons and check off the questions on the ant row of the grid. Are ants insects? Close by reciting the “Ant Hill” fingerplay.

Accommodations:  None needed

 


 

Whole Group Activity 4: The Very Quiet Cricket (GLEs: ELA 4, 9, 12b, 12c, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 31; SCI 3, 22, 23)

Materials List: The Very Quiet Cricket (book), live crickets in a small container that can be passed around the group, word grid from day one of week one, cricket sounds from http://www.fcps.k12.va.us/StratfordLandingES/Ecology/mpages/field_cricket.htm

Prior to the lesson record, download or access the site listed in the materials list for cricket sounds.

Open by reciting this fingerplay:

            The Little Cricket

(Point to one finger at a time.)
The first little cricket played a violin.
The second little cricket joined right in.
The third little cricket made a crackly song.
The fourth little cricket helped him along.
The fifth little cricket cried, "Crick-crick-cree.
The orchestra is over and it's time for tea!

Display the live crickets and ask students if they have ever heard a real cricket. Play the cricket sounds for students to hear. Using a DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), display the book and ask students to predict what they believe the story is about. Read the story aloud, pausing for questions, comments, and for students to revise their predictions of the story outcome. At the end of the story, ask students if they were surprised by the ending or if it were what they expected. Ask students if the story were real or pretend and why they think so. Pass the container of crickets around the group. Encourage students to tell the group what they see and hear. Ask leading questions to help students recognize the characteristics of insects as stated on the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) from day one of the prior week. Guide students to complete the cricket row of the word grid and to conclude that crickets are insects. Close the lesson by repeating the fingerplay or replaying the cricket sounds.

Accommodations:  None needed

 


 

Whole Group Activity 5: There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (GLEs: ELA 12a, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31; M 3)

Materials List: There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (book), word grid from day one of week one

Prior to the lesson, make color copies of the story characters on cardstock and laminate for durability. Tape a craft stick to the back of each character to create stick puppets.

Open with the song:

            Shoo Fly

            Shoo fly, don’t bother me                                                                                                                                                                               Shoo fly, don’t bother me                                                                                                                                                                               Shoo fly, don’t bother me                                                                                                                                                                               I belong to somebody!

Ask students if they have ever been bothered by a fly. Pause briefly for student responses and discussion. Display the book and tell students they need to listen carefully to what happens because after the story they will have to retell the story in the correct order. Read the story aloud. Encourage student participation in this very repetitive story. After reading the book, have students create a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions). Distribute the stick puppets and have students retell the story in order. Students should stand up in front of the rest of the group in the order their character appeared in the story. Encourage students to use dramatic voices as they retell the story. Repeat this activity until every student has had an opportunity to participate. Check the word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) from week one and assist students as they complete the row for flies. Close with the song Shoo Fly.

Accommodations:  None needed

Small Groups

Small Group Activity 1: Spider Webs (GLEs: ELA 21, 23, 24; M 10; SCI 2, 24)

Materials List: pictures of spider webs, white yarn or string, dinner size paper plates, hole punch, scissors

Prior to the lesson, cut out the centers of the paper plates (one per student) and punch holes around the inner edge of the paper plate ring. The holes should be about 1 – 2 inches apart.

Show students the pictures of the spider webs and explain that they are going to create pretend spider webs with the materials on the table. Begin by tying the loose end of the white yarn in one hole in a paper plate ring. Show students how to weave the web by pulling the yarn across the open center of the plate and through another punched hole on the opposite side of the plate. Show students how to continue this process until all the holes are used and there is a web-like pattern in the open center of the paper plate. Tie off the loose end in one of the holes. During this process, emphasize positional vocabulary such as over/under, across, beside, around, opposite, etc. Ask students to think about why spiders weave webs and what they think they could catch with a web if they were spiders.

Accommodations: Assist students with motor difficulties in completing the weaving tasks or by providing an easier alternative activity such as gluing lengths of white yarn on black construction paper in a web-like pattern.

 

Small Group Activity 2: Color Seriation (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 24; M 3; 6, 9)

Materials List: paint chips with 3 – 5 shades of color on a single card (several distinct colors such as blue, yellow, green, and red)

Prior to the lesson, visit your local paint store and collect a selection of paint cards. Cut the cards apart so that each color is a separate smaller card. Keep a matching set of cards that are not cut apart.

Show students the intact, uncut cards and ask them to identify the basic colors on each card. Point out that each card has lighter and darker shades of color. On each card, the colors are arranged in order from the lightest shade to the darkest shade. Next, show students the cards that have been cut apart. Explain that this is a special kind of puzzle where they need to put the colors in order from lightest to darkest, just like the first set of cards they saw. Give students the cards to arrange. Encourage them to work together as a group to figure out how to arrange the colors. After students have arranged the colors in order, have them check their work against the uncut cards.

Accommodations: Keep the uncut cards available for students to match the colors rather than ordering them on their own.

 

Small Group Activity 3: Weight Lifters (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 24; M 6; SCI 3, 4, 11, 12)

Materials List: several plastic buckets, blocks, large rocks, and/or bricks, kitchen scale, bathroom scale

Prior to the lesson fill each bucket with blocks, rocks or bricks in varying amounts so that each bucket weighs a different amount. Vary the weights from light (1 lb.) to heavy (20 lbs.).

 

Invite students to pretend they are ants and lift the buckets. Remind students that ants can lift and carry things that are very heavy compared to their tiny sizes. Encourage students to use the kitchen scales and the bathroom scales to weigh the buckets. Assist students in determining which scale would be the best one to use to weigh the different buckets. Lighter buckets would best be weighed on the kitchen scales because it measures lighter amounts of weight, whereas heavier buckets would best be weighed on the bathroom scales which is made to weigh heavier things.

Accommodations: None needed

 

Small Group Activity 4: How Do They Move? (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, 31; M 12; SCI 24; SS 4)

 

Materials List: word grid, small pictures of each of the bugs on the word grid

Prior to the lesson, create a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) similar to the following:

 

Crawl

Fly

Hop

Slither

Ladybug                              

 

 

 

 

Butterfly                             

 

 

 

 

Earthworm           

 

 

 

 

Honeybee                            

 

 

 

 

Spider                                  

 

 

 

 

Firefly                                 

 

 

 

 

Ant                                      

 

 

 

 

Cricket                                

 

 

 

 

Fly

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell students they are going to construct a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) by putting the pictures of each of the bugs on the grid in the correct column depending on whether the bug usually crawls, flies, hops or slithers. Encourage students to discuss and work as a group to put each of the bug pictures on the grid according to how it moves. After students have completed the word grid, discuss their work, encouraging them to justify why they chose to place the bugs where they did.

Accommodations: Offer verbal support and advice to students having difficulty deciding where to place the bugs and to those having difficulty explaining their work.

 

Small Group Activity 5: My Favorite Bug (GLEs: ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 21, 22, 24, 26; SCI 20, 24)

Materials List: white paper (at least one sheet per student), markers/crayons/colored pencils, pictures of the bugs featured in the 2 week unit

Invite students to create a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions) of their favorite bug from the past 2 weeks. Give each student a sheet of white paper and ask him/her to write his/her name. Display the pictures of the various kinds of bugs and have students draw/write about their favorite one. Once students have finished their drawings, have them dictate the kind of bug and any information they can recall about their favorite bug. Also have students dictate why that bug is their favorite. Collect and assemble all the learning log sheets into a class book that can be shared with the entire group. Add this class book to the science center library.

Accommodations: Encourage hesitant students to look at the pictures for ideas about which bug they like the best. Use guiding questions and comments to assist students in telling about their favorite insect.

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Color seriation: Observe and document student skills in ordering the color shades from lightest to darkest.

 

Resources

Children’s Books

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You an Ant? ISBN: 0-7534-5365-7

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Bee? ISBN: 0-7534-5345-2

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Butterfly? ISBN: 0-7534-5240-5

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Ladybug? ISBN: 0-7534-5241-7

Allen, Judy and Tudor Humphries. Are You a Spider? ISBN: 0-7534-5243-X

Barner, Bob. Bugs, Bugs, Bugs! ISBN: 0-439-17208-X

Barner, Bob. Bug Safari. ISBN: 0-439-74876-3

Bauer, Jeff. Butterfly Life Cycle. ISBN: 978-0-439-87652-0

Berger, Melvin. A Butterfly is Born. ISBN: 1-56784-012-4

Berger, Melvin. Busy As a Bee. ISBN: 1-56784-101-5

Berger, Melvin. The World of Ants. ISBN: 1-56784-008-6

Brenner, Barbara. Thinking About Ants. ISBN: 0-439-50109-1

Canizares, Susan. Butterfly. ISBN: 0-590-76160-9

Canizares, Susan and Pamela Chanko. What Do Insects Do? ISBN: 0-590-39794-X

Canizares, Susan and Mary Reid. Where Do Insects Live? ISBN: 0-590-39793-1

Carle, Eric. The Grouchy Ladybug. ISBN: 0-06-027087-X

Carle, Eric. The Very Busy Spider. ISBN: 0399211667

Carle, Eric. The Very Hungry Caterpillar. ISBN: 0-399-20853-4

Carle, Eric. The Very Lonely Firefly. ISBN: 978-0399227745

Carle, Eric. The Very Quiet Cricket. ISBN: 978-0399218859

Cronin, Doreen. Diary of a Worm. ISBN: 0-439-69234-2

Fleming, Denise. In the Tall, Tall Grass. ISBN: 0-590-46104-4

Fowler, Allan. It’s a Good Thing There are Insects. ISBN: 0-516-44905-2

Hoberman, Mary Ann. The Eensy-Weensy Spider. ISBN: 0-430-29516-5

Jeunesse, Gallimard and Sylvaine Peyrols. The Ladybug and Other Insects. ISBN: 0-439-54616-8

Kirk, David. Miss Spider’s Tea Party. ISBN: 0-590-47725-0

Lionni, Leo. Inch by Inch. ISBN: 0-688-13283-9

Martin, Justin McCory. Ladybug Life Cycle. ISBN: 978-0-439-87656-8

Marzollo, Jean. I’m a Caterpillar. ISBN: 0-590-66712-2                               

Maynard, Christopher. Incredible Mini-Beasts. ISBN: 1-56458-554-9

Murphy, Stuart J. The Best Bug Parade. ISBN: 0-06-446700-7

Pallotta, Jerry. The Butterfly Counting Book. ISBN: 0-590-04938-0

Pallotta, Jerry. The Icky Bug Alphabet Book. ISBN: 0-88106-450-5                                     

Parker, John. I Love Spiders. ISBN: 0-590-47807-9

Parker, Nancy Winslow and Joan Richards Wright. Bugs. ISBN: 0-590-44478-6

Posada, Mia. Ladybugs: Red, Fiery, and Bright. ISBN: 0-87614-334-6

Reid, Mary and Betsey Chessen. Bugs, Bugs, Bugs! ISBN: 0-590-39792-3

Rice, Dona Herweck. The Life of a Butterfly. ISBN: 0-7439-8518-4

Rice, Dona Herweck. Busy Bees. ISBN: 0-7439-8520-6

Schwartz, David M. Underfoot. ISBN: 1-57471-210-1

Singer, Marilyn. A Wasp Is Not a Bee. ISBN: 0-590-13904-5

Taback, Simms. There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. ISBN: 978-0670869398

Trumbauer, Lisa. Spinning a Web. ISBN: 1-56784-312-3

Watts, Barrie. Ladybug. ISBN: 0-382-09960-5

Wildsmith, Brian and Rebecca. Look Closer. ISBN: 0-590-47835-4

 

Recordings/CDs

Anna Moo: Crackers by Anna Moo

Dr. Jean: Kiss your Brain

Hap Palmer: Walter the Waltzing Worm

Jack Hartman: Rhyming to Read & Word Fiesta

Johnette Downing:

Mr. Al: Math in Motion

Raffi: More Singable Songs for the Very Young


Website Resources

http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/worms/index.html

http://lifecycle.onenessbecomesus.com/

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/butterflies/lifecycle/

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/critter/insect/index.htm

http://www.preschooleducation.com/sbug.shtml

http://www.fcps.k12.va.us/StratfordLandingES/Ecology/mpages/field_cricket.htm


Unit 10-5:  Louisiana

Study Focus:  Wetlands Animals

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on animals that live in or near wetlands areas of Louisiana.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that wetlands are important for many varieties of animals. Students will understand that animals live in different habitats.

Guiding Questions:

1.      Can students recognize wetlands areas?

2.      Can students name some of the features of a wetlands area?

3.      Can students identify animals that live in or near wetlands areas?

4.      Can students identify characteristics of wetlands animals?

Guiding Vocabulary: wetlands, bayou, habitat, swamp, marsh, alligator, crawfish, frog, turtle, duck, egret, heron, bass, bream, catfish, nymphs, dragonflies, snakes, crane

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)


 

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14b

Use simple reasoning skills by determining why something happens in a story read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)


 

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)


 

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-20

Give examples of different kinds of plants and different kinds of animals (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A4)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Wetlands Habitats

Fish, Crawfish and Frogs

Alligators and Snakes

Birds

Mammals

Whole Group Activities

KWL: Wetlands

ELA 1d, 4, 9, 16, 21, 22, 26, 29, 31, SCI 1, 2, 20, 22, 24, SS 2

Story Chain:

Jump Frog, Jump!

ELA 1a, 4, 5a, 5c, 5d, 6, 12a, 21, 22, 24, 25, 27, 28, M 2, 3, 4, 10, 13

SQPL:

Baby Alligator

ELA 1a, 1d, 4, 9, 16, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29, M 13, SCI 1, 20, 22

DR-TA:

The Louisiana State Bird Beauty Pageant

ELA 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b, 12c, 14b, 16, 21, 22, SS 4

SQPL:

Raccoon Moon

ELA 1d, 4, 14c, 16, 21, 22, 27, SCI 1, 22

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you ever seen a swamp?

Do you like frogs?

Do you like alligators?

Have you ever seen a pelican?

Have you ever seen a raccoon?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography.  

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  2911, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Life in a Wetland

 

My River

Izzie Lizzie Alligator

One Duck Stuck

Life in a Pond

Small Group Activities

Down in Louisiana

Counting

ELA 5a, 5c, 6, M 1, 2, 4, 13

RAFT – Fishing Stories ELA 3a, 3b, 4, 10, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, SS 2

Alligator Tails

ELA 21, 23, 24, 27, 28, M 13

Babies in the Bayou

Matching mothers and their babies

ELA 4, 9, 21, 22, 23, 24

Crawfish races

ELA 21, 22, 23, 24, M 3, SCI 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 23, 24

Music and Movement

drums and rhythm sticks

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

visit a local wetlands area; Wildlife and Fisheries educator; local zoo programs featuring wetlands/LA animals.


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Cut lily pad shapes from construction paper or fun foam.  Write numerals or draw dots on each. Give students plastic or paper cut=outs of small frogs to count out the correct number of frogs onto each lily pad.

Measurement

Tape a piece of masking tape to the floor and have each student pretend to be a frog and leap one leap down the length of tape. Have students mark where they land with a die-cut frog with their name on it. Have them jump again and put down another frog with their name on it. Have them compare how far they jumped the first time to their second jump.

Geometry

Use geometric shape cut-outs to create Louisiana water animals.

Data Collection Graph: Louisiana wetlands animal

Patterning

Use different color die-cut frogs to copy, extend, or create frog patterns.

Science

SCI 1,2,3,4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11,22,23,24,25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26,31

M 6,9,11,

SS 4

learning logs and  writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

plastic wetlands animals

pond habitat: tub filled with water, plastic animals, plastic plants, rocks, etc.

binoculars

sink and float

colored water mixing

 


 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

move like a crawfish (crawfish walk races),

leap frog game, slither like a snake, act out Five Little Ducks went out to Play

stilt walking

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student made signs and labels

camping gear – backpack, binoculars, field guide, maps, flashlight, fishing pole and net

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9,10,11,13

SCI 9

SS 4

crawfish, frog and alligator counters, frogs to lilypad number matching game, fish counters, size seriation wetlands animals or larger to smaller fish, turtle counters, duck counters

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs.

http://www.uptoten.com/kids/kidsgames-puzzles-beaverspuzzle.html

http://www.primarysite-kidszone.co.uk/KidsZone/resources/frogs-life.html

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

Reed painting; feather painting, crayon resist drawings, watercolors,

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

turtles, ducks, woodland animals

 

Water:

pond or bayou animals and plants (real or pretend), small nets, and tubs or boats

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

The Alligator Chomp, Freddy the Friendly Duck - Jack Hartman; Little White Duck, Five Green and Speckled Frogs - Raffi; The Alligator Chant, Tiny Tim the Turtle, Baby Fish - Dr. Jean; Lady with the Alligator Purse, Leap Frog Croaky, I Want to Be a Frog Today, Turtles - Johnette Downing; Five Frogs, Alligator Stomp- Anna Moo

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

fishing trip gear: inflatable boat or a box for a boat, poles, life vests, small ice chest, tackle box with lures (hooks removed), fisherman’s hats, maps or guides; fishing magazines

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books;

Louisiana outdoor magazines; fishing magazines

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

teacher-made word cards with pictures and names of animals often found in LA wetlands areas

 

 

Whole Group

 

Whole Group Activity 1: KWL: Wetlands (GLEs: ELA 1d, 4, 9, 16, 21, 22, 26, 29, 31; SCI 1, 2, 20, 22, 24; SS 2)

 

Materials List: Wetlands (book), chart paper, markers, Little White Duck by Raffi from the CD “Everything Grows”

 

Open the lesson by playing and singing the song Little White Duck. Create a graphic organizer (view literacy strategy descriptions) in the form of a KWL, by printing the word Wetlands at the top of a piece of chart paper, then dividing the chart paper into 3 sections. Label each section as follows: Know, Wonder, and Learned. Read each word to the class and ask students to share what they know about wetlands. Show students the front cover of the book, Wetlands, and explain that a wetlands area can be a river, bayou, pond, or lake. Encourage students to name the animals, plants, and insects they know live in and around wetlands areas. Write down student knowledge in the “Know” section of the chart. Point out the “Wonder” section of the chart and ask students to think about wetlands areas and the animals living there, and then share their “I Wonder” statements or questions with the class. Write these statements and questions down in the “Wonder” section of the chart. Return to the book. Remind students to listen for the answers to their questions as the text is read aloud. Read the text, pausing to allow for student discussion and questions. If the answer to a question on the “Wonder” section of the chart remains unanswered, make sure to point out both the question as it is written on the chart and discuss the answer with the students.


 

Following the reading, have students tell what they learned about wetlands areas from the text and write the new knowledge on the “learned” section of the chart. Review the entire chart, then hang it in a place where students can refer to it throughout the unit.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Jump, Frog, Jump! (GLEs: ELA 1a, 4, 5a, 5c, 5d, 6, 12a, 21, 22, 24, 25, 27, 28; M 2, 3, 4, 10, 13)

 

Materials List: Jump, Frog, Jump! (book), teacher-made story cards of the characters from the book, Five Green and Speckled Frogs  by Raffi from CD “Singable Songs for the Very Young”

 

Prior to the lesson, photocopy illustrations of the animals in the story. Cut out and mount the animal pictures on cardstock with the name of each animal printed underneath. Laminate the story cards for durability. Optional: reduce and copy a set of the story cards for each student to take home.

 

Introduce the book by displaying the front cover and reading the title aloud while pointing at the text with a finger or pointer. Ask students to predict what will happen in the story based on the illustration on the front cover. Tell students they need to listen carefully to the story because after it is read, they will construct a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) of the events in the story. Read the story aloud, encouraging students to join in on the repetitive stanza of the story. Pause frequently for student comments and questions and to allow students to predict what will happen next in the story. After the reading, distribute the story cards to student volunteers. Have the volunteers holding the story cards stand in front of the group while holding the cards facing outward. Make sure the story cards are in random order. Ask another student to be the checker. This volunteer will be in charge of checking the book to see if the class correctly sequenced the cards. Have the class look at the cards and tell the volunteers holding them to move those holding the cards into the correct order with the first animal on the left and progressing to the last animal on the right. Repeat the activity as time and interest allow. Close by playing/singing Five Green and Speckled Frogs.

 

Accommodations: Encourage unsure students to participate by asking leading questions to help them determine the correct order of the story chain cards.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: Baby Alligator (GLEs: ELA 1a, 1d, 4, 9, 16, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; M 13; SCI 1, 20, 22)

 

Materials List: Baby Alligator (book), chart paper or white board, markers, “Alligator Pie” (poem)

 

Open by reciting the poem “Alligator Pie” by Dennis Lee:

Alligator pie, alligator pie,
If I don't get some I think I'm gonna die.
Give away the green grass, give away the sky,
But don't give away my alligator pie.

Alligator stew, alligator stew,
If I don't get some I don't know what I'll do.
Give away my furry hat, give away my shoe,
But don't give away my alligator stew.

 

Alligator soup, alligator soup,
If I don't get some I think I'm gonna droop.
Give away my hockey stick, give away my hoop,
But don't give away my alligator soup.

 

Show students the front cover of Baby Alligator. Write the following statement on the board or chart paper: “Alligators eat people.” Tell students to think about the statement. Repeat the statement as needed. Ask students what they think about that statement. Do they believe it’s true or false? Lead students in a discussion about whether they believe alligators eat people. Ask students what questions they have about alligators. Write student questions on the board or chart paper. Read the book, pausing for student questions and comments about the text and illustrations. Whenever a question that’s written on the board is answered, point it out to students and pause for student discussion of the question and answer.  Continue to use the text to answer the questions on the board, checking off each question as it’s answered. After the book is read, refer to any unanswered questions. Ask students how those questions might be answered. Make arrangements for other resources to be made available to answer the questions. Remind students that asking questions is one way to learn new things and that many new things can be learned through reading books.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4: The Louisiana State Bird Beauty Pageant (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b, 12c, 14b, 16, 21, 22, SS 4)

 

Materials List: The Louisiana State Bird Beauty Pageant (book), chart paper or white board, markers, Freddie the Friendly Duck from Jack Hartman’s CD “Getting Better at Getting Along”

 

Open by playing/singing the song Freddie the Friendly Duck. Display the front cover of the book and read the title aloud. Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), ask students what they think the story will be about and write their predictions on the chart paper or white board. Discuss the illustrations and follow the text with a finger or pointer as the book is read aloud. Pause where appropriate for student questions, comments and to allow students to revise their predictions about the story. Following the reading, refer to the predictions written on the chart paper or board. Read the predictions aloud to students and let them decide which predictions were accurate. Discuss the social aspects of the story as


 

well: Why was Monique chosen as the LA state bird? Were the other birds friendly to Monique? How did the other birds make Monique feel? Was Monique a friend to the other birds? Were the other birds friendly to Monique?

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5: Raccoon Moon (GLEs: ELA 1d, 4, 14c, 16, 21, 22, 27; SCI 1, 22)

 

Materials List: Raccoon Moon (book), chart paper or white board, markers

 

Open with the following action song:

I'm a Little Raccoon

(tune: I'm a Little Teapot)                      

I'm a little raccoon, prowling around, (use your hands like little paws and make a cautious prowling motion.)

I hunt for food without a sound (look left and then right and then make a shhhhhh motion -- with your finger to your lips)

A mask on my face and a bushy tail, (point to your eyes and then swish one arm behind you like a tail)

Let's see if you can spot my trail! (point at someone, then put hand on forehead (like a salute) and gaze at the floor like you're looking for pawprints)

 

Using a modified SQPL strategy (view literacy strategy descriptions), write the following statement on the board or chart paper: “Only alligators live in wetlands areas.” Read the statement aloud, encouraging students to orally express their opinions about the statement. Repeat the statement and ask students, think of a question based on the statement “Only alligators live in wetlands areas.” Write students’ questions on the board or chart paper, placing a check mark or star next to questions asked more than once to indicate that this is an important question. Read the story, Raccoon Moon, pausing in places where the students’ questions are answered in the text or illustrations. As questions on the list are answered, mark them off the list. Continue in this fashion until the entire story is read. Answer any unanswered questions from your own knowledge or assist students in finding the answers in other sources. Close by repeating the action song I’m a Little Raccoon.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 


 

Small Groups

 

Small Group Activity 1: Down in Louisiana (GLEs: ELA 5a, 5c, 6, M 1, 2, 4, 13)

 

Materials List: Down in Louisiana (book)

 

Invite students to join in a counting story about animals who live in the swamps of Louisiana. Display the book and read the title, sweeping a finger or pointer under the text as it is read. Tell students that this is a counting story, so they will need to help count all the baby animals on each page. Read the story and encourage students to join in the repetitive verses. After each animal is introduced, pause and encourage students to orally count the baby animals in the illustrations. Close by having students name each animal in the story as you show them the illustrations in the book.

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 2: Fishing Stories (GLEs: ELA 3a, 3b, 4, 10, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26; SS 2)

 

Materials List: Nathan’s Fishing Trip (book), white paper, markers/crayons/colored pencils

 

Read Nathan’s Fishing Trip to the class. Ask students to imagine that they have been on a fishing trip and are writing a story about their trip for this modified RAFT (view literacy strategy descriptions).

 

For this RAFT, students will do the following:

                        R – Take on the Role of a fisher

                        A – Write/Draw a story for the Audience of other children

                        F – The Form is a story

                        T – The Topic is a fishing story

 

Give each student a piece of paper for their story. Have students who are able to do so to write their first names on the back of the paper. Have students draw a picture of their fishing trip on the front of the paper. After students have drawn a picture of what happened on their real or imaginary fishing trip, write each student’s dictation on his/her story page.

 

Gather all the stories and create a display or assemble them into a class book titled Our Fishing Tales.  At the next group gathering, take a moment to share the fishing stories with the class before displaying or putting them into a book for the Science or Library Center.

 

Accommodations: Give oral or visual prompts to students having difficulty remembering or imagining a fishing story.

 

 

Small Group Activity 3: Alligator Tails (GLEs: ELA 21, 23, 24, 27, 28; M 13)

 

Materials List: heavy duty white bulletin board paper, green tempera paint, paint brushes, hole puncher, yarn, Alligator by Dr. Jean from the “Sings Silly Songs” CD

 

Prior to the lesson, pre-cut the bulletin board paper into large triangular shapes similar to the shape/ and length of an alligator’s tail. Punch a hole at each corner of the tail where it would attach to the student’s backside. Later, yarn will be tied into these holes.

 

This activity will take one or more day to complete.

 

Play the song Alligator and have students join in. Invite students to make alligator tails of their own to wear. Provide each student with an alligator tail paper. Have students write their names on one side of the paper then paint the other side of the paper with the green paint. After the paint has dried; tie lengths of yarn into the holes on 2 corners of each tail. Tie the loose ends of the yarn around the students’ waists so that their alligator tails hang down their backsides. Repeat the song Alligator with the students wearing their tails.

 

Accommodations: Assist students needing help with writing their names.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4: Matching Mothers and Babies (GLEs: ELA 4, 9, 21, 22, 23, 24)

 

Materials List: Babies in the Bayou (book), pictures of the animal mothers and babies featured in the book

 

Prior to the lesson, make a photocopy of each adult animal and the corresponding baby animal in the book. Cut out these pictures and mount them on cardstock and write the name of the animal under the adult animal picture and the baby name under baby animal picture, e.g. duck and duckling.

 

Read the story, Babies in the Bayou, to the small group of students. Following the story, show students the adult animal cards and have them tell the name of each animal. Then show students the baby animal cards, having students name each of these animals using the correct baby name for the animal. Instruct students to work together to match the adult animals to the baby animals by putting their cards together. Ask one student to check the book and be sure the group matched all the animals correctly. After students have completed the matching task, have them orally describe what they did and name the animal mothers and babies.

 

Accommodations: Assist students in correctly naming the adult and baby animals in the story.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 5: Crawfish Races (GLEs: ELA 21, 22, 23, 24; M 3;  SCI 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 23, 24)

 

Materials List: live crawfish, colored masking tape, colored construction paper flags, colored dots

 

Prior to the lesson, obtain a number of live crawfish to match the number of students in your small groups (i.e. 5 students = 5 crawfish). Note: Live crawfish are often available from restaurants serving boiled crawfish. Prepare the crawfish for the race by putting a small adhesive, colored dot on the back of each. Be sure each crawfish is designated a different color or combination of colors. Make race flags to match each crawfish’s color(s) by taping construction paper rectangles to a straw or craft stick. Create a racing “ring” by putting masking tape down on the floor in a circular shape. The masking tape circle should be no more than about 3 feet in diameter.

 

Before the races, give students ample opportunity to observe the crawfish with magnifying glasses. Be sure students understand that the crawfish can pinch very hard, so they should be careful not to touch them except when an adult is present to help them. Students should also understand that if they do touch a crawfish, they need to immediately go wash their hands with soap and water.

 

To conduct the crawfish races, have each student in the group choose which crawfish he/she thinks will be the first one to crawl out of the circle on the floor. Give each student the flag that corresponds with the crawfish he/she has chosen. Carefully put all the crawfish in the center of the circle marked by the masking tape and let the races begin. Students will cheer on their favorites! The first crawfish to cross the line of the circle is the winner!

 

Alternate Activity: If crawfish are unavailable, have the students be the crawfish and race each other. Show students how to crab (crawfish) crawl (belly up, knees bent with feet and hands on the floor/ground). Designate a start and finish line and have students race while in their crawfish position. 

 

Accommodations: None needed

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

·         Small Group Activity 1: Assess student counting skills.

 

·         Small Group Activity 2: RAFT writing sample.

 

 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

Arnosky, Jim. All About Alligators ISBN:  0-590-46789-1

Arnosky, Jim. All About Frogs. ISBN: 0-590-48165-7

Arnosky, Jim. All About Turtles. ISBN: 0-590-48149-5

Arnosky, Jim. Babies in the Bayou. ISBN: 978-0-399-22653-3

Back, Christine and Barrie Watts. Tadpole and Frog. ISBN: 0-382-24021-9

Bains, Rae. Wonders of the River. ISBN: 0-89375-571-0

Baker, Keith. Quack and Count. ISBN: 0-15-205025-6

Boundy, Jeff. Snakes of Louisiana. LA Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries

Cain, Sheridan and Tanya Linch. Look Out for the Big Bad Fish! ISBN: 0-439-07798-2

Canizares, Susan and Daniel Moreton. Frogs. ISBN: 0-590-76159-5

Clarke, Ginjer. Baby Alligator. ISBN: 0-448-42095-3

Cristini, Ermanno and Luigi Puricelli. In the Pond. ISBN: 0-590-43635-X

Dabcovich, Lydia. Busy Beavers. ISBN: 0-590-42807-1

Delacre, Lulu. Nathan’s Fishing Trip. ISBN: 0-590-41282-5

Downing, Johnette. Down in Louisiana. ISBN: 978-1589804517

Fleming, Denise. In the Small, Small Pond. ISBN: 0-8050-2264-3

Fowler, Allan. Life in a Wetland. ISBN: 13:9780516264176

Freeman, Marcia. Wetlands. ISBN: 1-56784-381-6

Geraghty, Paul. Over in the Sweet Steamy Swamp. ISBN: 0-15-200226-X

Gibbons, Gail. Marshes and Swamps. ISBN 10: 0823415155

Halpern, Shari. My River. ISBN: 0-590-72814-8

Hogan, Paula. The Beaver. ISBN: 0-8172-1502-6

 

Kalan, Robert. Jump, Frog, Jump! ISBN: o-688-13954-X

Kent, Jack. The Caterpillar and the Polliwog. ISBN: 0-671-66281-3

Knight, David. Alligators and Crocodiles. ISBN: 0-8167-4983-3

Langley, Andrew. Wetlands Nature Search. ISBN: 0-89577-482-8

Lillegard, Dee. Frog’s Lunch. ISBN: 0-590-27378-7

London, Jonathan. Froggy Learns to Swim. ISBN: 0-439-18852-0

MacDonald, Amy and Sarah Fox-Davies. Little Beaver and the Echo. ISBN: 0-590-12026-3

Martin, Justin McCory. Frog Life Cycle. ISBN: 978-0-439-87657-5

McCloskey, Robert. Make Way for Ducklings. ISBN: 0-590-33949-4

National Geographic. Hide and Seek.

Pallotta, Jerry and David Biedrzycki. The Fresh Water Alphabet Book. ISBN: 0-88106-900-0

Paparone, Pamela. Five Little Ducks. ISBN: 0-590-96581-6

Pfeffer, Wendy. From Tadpole to Frog. ISBN: 0-06-445123-2

Rice, Dona Herweck. The Life of a Frog. ISBN: 0-7439-8517-6

Root, Phyllis. One Duck Stuck. ISBN: 0-590-51661-2

Rounds, Glen. Beaver. ISBN: 0-439-17316-7

Schwartz, David M. Green Snake. ISBN: 1-57471-557-7

Schwartz, David M. Pond. ISBN: 1-57471-211-X

Schwartz, David. At the Pond. ISBN: 1-57471-211-X

Sendak, Maurice. Alligators All Around: An Alphabet. ISBN: 0-590-45451-X

Simmons, Jane. Daisy and the Egg. ISBN: 0-439-17702-2

St. Pierre, Todd-Michael. The Louisiana State Bird Beauty Pageant. ISBN: 0-9675170-0-1

St. Romain, Rose Anne. Moon’s Cloud Blanket. ISBN: 1-56554-922-8

Stidworthy, John. Ponds and Streams. ISBN: 0-8167-1964-0

Tate, Suzanne. Izzie Lizzie Alligator. ISBN: 1-878405-23-3

Thompson, Lauren. Little Quack’s New Friend. ISBN: 978-0-545-00377-3

Trumbauer, Lisa. Life in a Pond. ISBN: 1-56784-314-X

Trumbaur, Lisa. Follow the River. ISBN: 1-56784-377-8

Ward, Lorraine and Laura Jacques. A Walk in the Wild. ISBN: 0-88-1106-478-5

Watts, Barrie. See How They Grow: Duck. ISBN: 0-525-67346-6

Westcott, Nadine. The Lady With the Alligator Purse. ISBN: 0-440-84509-2

Williams, Rozanne Lanczak. Little Green Frog. ISBN: 0-916119-50-5

Willis, Nancy Carol. Raccoon Moon. ISBN: 978-0966276138

 

 

 

Recordings/CDs

 

Anna Moo: Anna Moo Crackers

Dr Jean Sings Silly Songs

Jack Hartman: Getting Better at Getting Along

Jack Hartman: Math All Around Me

Johnette Downing: Fins and Grins

Johnette Downing: Wild and Wooley Wiggle Songs

Raffi: Everything Grows

Raffi: Singable Songs for the Very Young


Unit 10-6:  Louisiana

Study Focus:  Sea Life and Summer  (week 1 of 2)

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on the Gulf of Mexico habitat and the animals that live in and around the Gulf Coast.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that the Gulf of Mexico is a body of salt water bordering the southern coast of Louisiana. Students will understand that animals live in and around the Gulf of Mexico. Students will understand that the Gulf of Mexico is a place where many people fish for pleasure and work. Students will understand that many people travel to Gulf beaches in the summer.

Guiding Questions:

1.      Can students locate the Gulf of Mexico on a Louisiana map?

2.      Can students identify some of the animals living in or around the Louisiana Gulf coast?

3.      Can students appreciate the work of fisherman and that fishing can be a fun sport?

4.      Can students understand that the Gulf of Mexico beaches are a travel destination?

Guiding Vocabulary: Gulf of Mexico, coast, beach, waves, tide, sand, shells, marine biologist, shark, porpoise, stingray, redfish, shrimp, oyster, crab, nets, fishing poles, rod and reel, bait, shells

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)


 

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-13

Identify problems and solutions in stories that are read aloud (PK‑LL‑R2) (ELA‑7‑E2)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK‑LL‑W3) (PK‑LL‑W4) (PK‑LL‑L3) (ELA‑2‑E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)


 

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)


 

 Study Focus

 

Under the Sea

Ocean Treasures

Fishy Friends

More Fish

Ocean Creatures

Whole Group Activities

Sea Life Introduction

ELA 4, 9, 22; SCI 2, 22; SS 2

The Underwater Alphabet

ELA 3, 4, 8, 9; SCI 2, 22

Ten Little Fishes

ELA 4, 9; M 1, 5

S-H-A-R-K

ELA 3, 4, 8, 24, 27; M 13; SCI 22

Over in the Ocean

ELA 4, 8, 9; M 1, 4, 10, 13

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you ever been to the Gulf?

Have you ever been swimming in the Gulf?

Have you seen a live fish?

Have you seen a shark?

Have you found a shell at the beach?

Storytime

Suggested

Alternative story titles are listed in

The Bibliography)

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Life in the Sea

The Ocean Alphabet Book

Surrounded by the Sea

The Ocean Is

Animals of the Ocean

Small Group Activities

Sand, Shells,  and Waves

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Shell

Fish of the Gulf

Fish Facts

Sea Shape Geometry

Music and Movement

movement with blue fabric to simulate waves to dance along with classical music, ocean drum, sand blocks, sand shakers, strips of blue fabric or scarves for wave dancing

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

fisherman/woman, biologist, boat owner with boat, trip to aquarium, fish store owner, trip to fish store or pet store, trip to the Gulf of Mexico


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Play dough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Have students dig in sand and find sea shells. As they find them, students can lay shells on a number chart.  Have students count the sea shells to see how many were found.  

Measurement

Have students weigh sea shells in a balance scale and compare weights.

Geometry

Have students use shells to create different geometric shapes.

Data Collection

BLM Graph:

What shell did you pick up in your pail?

Patterning

Using two sea shells and playdough, have students create  patterns by making  impressions in the dough.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26,31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

Sand (book)

jars with sand and water for mixing and observation

seashells - a variety of sizes and shapes for comparisons; starfish

Louisiana coastal or waterway map

fishing lures with a pan balance to  weigh and measure

measuring tape

fish photos

a wave bottle for wave simulation

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

Fish, Fish, Shark (like Duck, Duck, Goose)

Art/fish beach scene - paint a beach scene on butcher paper outdoors

fishing poles and magnetic fish for fishing

bathing suit relay game - a variety of different sizes of bathing suits on both ends. Have students race to put on suits then run to other end.

beach ball and volleyball

water painting - Have students dip paint brushes in water that is in a bucket or pail to paint the building outside.

boat or pirogue (actual or box boat); oars and paddles


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10,

11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student made signs and labels

Louisiana map, ice chest, fishing poles, magnetic fish, cars/trucks,plastic or rubber fish and crabs; fishing net or scoop, measuring tape

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9,10,11,13

SCI 9

SS 4

Matching Fish cut outs - number 10 fish and make 10 corresponding fish with 1-10 dots or stickers on them

wooden, rubber, or plastic  fish counters for counting, sorting, or patterning with “water”  or fishbowl counting mats

fish foamies in different sizes for sorting or seriation

matching or sorting of real sea shells

graduated ordering of fishing weights, fishing lures for patterning or sorting

Dollar Store fish erasers for counting, sorting, patterning, fish puzzles, Go Fish card game

plastic fish bowl and diecut fish shapes for counting game with number generators (dice)

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs.

http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/under-the-sea/index.html

http://www.epa.gov/beaches/kids/game-matching.html

http://funschool.kaboose.com/preschool/art-activity-center/games/game_coloring_book_fun.html

http://www.uptoten.com/kids/kidsgames-mixedbag-shellspairs.html

http://www.uptoten.com/kids/boowakwala-family-seaside-sandcastle.html

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

seashell prints; watercolor painting; watercolor drops on paper towels or coffee filters; real fish prints;

fish stamps, stickers or stencils; sand art - colored sand; a variety of depths in babyfood jars and/or glue sand to create a beach scene; painting prints with fishing lures; fish collage-cutouts from fishing magazines, clipart, boardmaker, stickers, etc.

 

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

sand molds, sea shells, pails, buckets, shovels, wet and dry sand

 

Water:

blue food coloring; sea shells; plastic or rubber fish shapes; corks, bobs


 

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Going Bass Fishing - Anna Moo

Baby Fish, Five Fish Swimming in the Sea, Going Over the Sea, A Sailor Went to Sea,

Did You Ever Go Fishing - Dr. Jean

Fish Dance, Music of the Seas, Most Fish Swim - Johnette Downing:

Five Little Fish, Ten Little Fish, Over in the Ocean - Jack Hartman

Harp by the Sea, Wonders of the Ocean - Growing Minds with Music:

http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/gallery/sound/sound.html - Sound in the Sea Gallery

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

beach prop box- beach basket; swim suits – variety of sizes for boys/girls; goggles; beach ball; beach towel; plastic crabs, fish; sunglasses; visors and sun hats; picnic basket with lunch food; empty sunscreen bottle; sea shells, pails, buckets, shovels

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

magazines - Outdoor Life, Conservation, Louisiana Sportsman, Field and Stream

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

beach and fish word cards; stamps; stencils; magazines -Outdoor Life, Conservation, Louisiana Sportsman

 

 

 


 

Whole Group Activities

 

 

 Whole Group Activity 1:  Sea Life Introduction (GLEs: ELA 4, 9, 22; SCI 2, 22; SS 2)

 

Materials List:  Let’s Discover the Seaside (book), state of Louisiana map

 

Show the map of Louisiana to the students.  Draw attention to the bottom of the map and how the state is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico.  Introduce the Gulf of Mexico as a large body of salt water in which various activities are undertaken; e.g., fishing (recreation and commercial), swimming, snorkeling, shelling, diving.  Indicate that the class will study the Gulf and its inhabitants, its oceanography, and its recreational and commercial uses.  Read the book and discuss the variety of activities that occurred.  Lead the students in a discussion that compares the information in the text with the information taken from the map; e.g., the seaside that is formed by the Gulf, the waves that break onto the shoreline, the fishermen fishing, people swimming, the animals that live off-shore. 

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2:  The Underwater Alphabet (GLEs: ELA 3, 4, 8, 9; SCI 2, 22)

 

Materials List:  Underwater Alphabet Book (book), A-Z alphabet cards, dry erase board, markers

 

Introduce the book by showing the cover and reading the title.  Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), ask the students to predict what the story line will be.  Write their predictions on the board or flipchart.  Read the book, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions from the students.  At the end of the read-aloud, review students’ predictions and ask them if the story line was as they expected and the reasons as to why or why not.  List their responses on the board.  Place the alphabet cards on the floor.  Show a particular letter from the text to the class.  Recruit a student to choose the corresponding letter from the alphabet pile, show it to the class.  Repeat until every letter in the text has been used and all students have had a turn.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 


 

Whole Group Activity 3:  Ten Little Fishes (GLEs: ELA 4, 9, M 1, 5)

 

Materials List:  Ten Little Fish (book), fish cut-outs numbered 1-10 that have been hole-punched and strung with yarn so that they can be worn as necklaces, yarn

 

Prior to reading the book, tell the students to listen carefully and be ready to tell what is different about how this book orders numbers.  Read the book. Once the reading has been completed, ask the students to identify what was different in the counting sequence (i.e., the book counts backwards from ten to one).  Then, choose ten students whose tasks will be to wear one of the fish necklaces and to role play each numbered fish and its actions as the storyline is read for the second time.  Continue until all students have had a turn.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4:  S-H-A-R-K (GLEs: ELA 3, 4, 8, 24, 27, M 13, SCI 22)

 

Materials List:  Shark (book), letter cards depicting the letters of ‘shark’(s, h, a, r, k)

 

Read the book and discuss the manner in which sharks inhabit the Gulf as well as other waterways around the world, the different types of sharks, the characteristics of sharks, the myths about sharks.  Lead a discussion among the students about sharks that includes material from the text as well as their own experiences or thoughts about sharks.  Indicate to the students that they will learn how to spell shark and will learn a song about sharks. 

 

(To the tune of “B-I-N-G-O”; accompanying movements indicating a “Gator Chomp”)

 

I know a fish

That swims in the Gulf, and

SHARK is its name-o.

 

S-H-A-R-K,     

S-H-A-R-K,

S-H-A-R-K, and

SHARK is its name-o.

 


 

2nd time through . . .

Chomp-H-A-R-K

And Shark is its name-o.

 

3RD time through . . .

Chomp-Chomp-A-R-K

And Shark is its name-o.

 

4th time through . . .

Chomp-Chomp-Chomp-R-K

And Shark is its name-o.

 

5TH time through . . .

Chomp-Chomp-Chomp-Chomp-K

And Shark is its name-o.

 

6th time through . . .

Chomp-Chomp-Chomp-Chomp-Chomp

And Shark is its name-o.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5:  Over in the Ocean (GLEs: ELA 4, 8, 9, M 1, 4, 10, 13)

 

Materials List:  Over in the Ocean (book), Over in the Ocean (song), numbered cards from 1-10 with corresponding animals depicted in the book written at the bottom

 

Read the book and discuss the various forms of sea life found in the ocean.  Choose ten students to stand in front of the class, present them with a numbered card, and instruct them to step forward and say their numbers when they hear their animal and number sung on the CD.  Play the CD and have each student role play their respective parts at the appropriate time.  Continue until all students have had a turn.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activities

 

 

Small Group Activity 1:  Sand, Shells, and Waves (GLEs: ELA 4, 8, 9, 24, SCI 3, 14, 22)

 

Materials List:  At the Seashore (book), a clear plastic water bottle filled with one inch of sand and small shells and filled ¾ to the top of the bottle with tap water dyed with blue food coloring

 

Discuss the manner in which waves are created on the shoreline, e.g., the incoming waves and the outgoing runoff; the mixing of sand, shells and water; over the top of the sand.  Have the students identify different experiences they’ve had with waves or pictures that they’ve seen.  Demonstrate the dynamics of waves with the bottle filled with sand, shells and blue water by: 1) grasping the bottle at each end, 2) tipping the bottle downward on the left while raising the other end, and 3) allowing the shaken contents to settle.  Once this process has been demonstrated, pass the bottle among the students so that they can simulate the wave action and see it settle by themselves.  Follow this experiential segment by reading the book to the students and discussing the big picture of the shoreline, e.g., plants and animals that inhabit the sea, the wave actions.  At the end of the lesson, place the sand-filled water bottle in the science center for further review. 

 

Accommodations:   None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 2:  There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Shell (GLEs: ELA 4, 8, 11, 24, 27, M 3)

 

Materials List: There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Shell (book), word cards or cards with pictures of the characters depicted in the story, dry erase board, markers, paper, crayons

 

Read the book and discuss the items that the Old Lady swallowed.  Emphasize the order in which she swallowed the items, i.e., what she swallowed first, then second, then third, etc.  Using the picture or word cards, have the students create a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions).  Once the story has been retold, ask the students to identify words that rhymed.  List these words on the dry erase board.  Once this lesson has been completed, have the students draw pictures of something unbelievable that they could swallow.  Collate these pictures into a book and place it in the book center.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty identifying words that rhymed by re-reading various sections that include rhyming words.

 

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 3:  Fish of the Gulf (GLEs: ELA 4, 8, 10, 16, 18, SCI 3, 22)

 

Materials List: Angler’s Guide to Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico (book), paper, crayons

 

Select a variety of listings from the book that illustrate the vast number of fish that reside in the Gulf of Mexico; e.g., sharks, red fish, grouper, cobia, amberjack, stingray, dolphin, snapper, kingfish.  Show the pictures from the book to the students and discuss the facts and characteristics of each fish.  Once the text has been discussed, have the students draw pictures of specific fish (e.g., their favorite).  Collate these pictures into a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions) and place it in the science center.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty remembering a specific fish.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4:  Fish Facts (GLEs: ELA 4, 8, 9, 10, SCI 3, 22)

 

Materials List:  Fish Facts (book), a teacher-made illustration of a fish that labels body parts, e.g., fins, tail, scales, gills

 

Read the book and discuss each fact on each page as it is read.  Using the teacher-made illustration, point to the labeled body parts of the fish and describe their specific functions.  Also describe specific facts about fish as identified in the book, e.g., fish have scales in addition to skin, fish eyes do not close, fish have no eye-lids, most fish hatch from eggs, fish live in water.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 5:  Sea Shape Geometry (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 14, M 8)

 

Materials List:  Sea Shapes (book), construction paper, scissors, markers, bulletin board paper to be used as a backdrop for student pictures, glue

 

Read the book and discuss the various geometric shapes of sea life that are identified, e.g., star, circles, square, diamond, oval.  Distribute scissors, markers, and construction paper to each student.  Instruct the students to draw a specific example of sea life that represents a specific geometric shape, e.g., a star fish is in the shape of a star, a shell is in the shape of a circle, a fish in the shape of an oval.  Glue the pictures onto the bulletin board paper backdrop to create a collage of sea shapes.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Sample Assessments

 

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

Activity-specific Assessments

 

·         Small Group Activity 2: Observe and document the student’s story chain picture.

 

·         Small Group Activity 3: Observe and document the student’s response to the learning log journal.

 

 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

 

Aliki. My Visit to the Aquarium, ISBN: 0-06-446186-6

Andreae, Giles. Commotion in the Ocean, ISBN: 0-439-08214-5

Archambault, John. The Birth of a Whale, ISBN: 1-58669-121-X

Audubon Institute. The Institute, Summer 1992, A Publication of the Audubon Institute

Bassede, Francine. George’s Store at the Shore, ISBN: 0-439-13377-7

Bauer, David. Fish Facts, ISBN: 0-7398-5837-8

Berger, Gilda. Whales, ISBN: 0-385-23420-1

Canizares, Susan and Betsey Chessan. What Comes in a Shell, ISBN: 0-590-63878-5

Carle, Eric. A House for Hermit Crab, ISBN: 0-590-42567-6

Carle, Eric. Mister Seahorse, ISBN: 0-399-24269-4

Chanko, Pamela. Sea Creatures, ISBN: 0-590-63880-7

Chinery, Michael. Life Story: Shark, ISBN: 0-8167-2105-X

Colandro, Lucille. There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Shell, ISBN 0-439-81536-3

Cole, Sheila. When the Tide is Low, ISBN: 0-688-04067-7

Corrigan, Patricia. Sharks for Kids, ISBN: 1-55971-476-X

Craig, Janet. What’s Under the Ocean, ISBN: 0-89375-653-9

Daynes, Katie. 1001 Things to Spot in the Sea, ISBN: 978079450229-4

Dickens, Lucy. My Sister and Me At the Beach, ISBN 0-670-83927-2

Doubilet, Anne. Under the Sea from A to Z, ISBN: 0-590-48598-9

Edwards, Nicola and Jane Harris. Sand, ISBN: 0-7608-5086-0

Fotheringham, Nick and Susan Brunemeister. Beachcomber’s Guide to Gulf Coast Marine Life: Florida, Alabama,      

Mississippi, Louisiana, & Texas, ISBN: 0-87201-186-0

Freymann, Saxton and Joost Elffers. One Lonely Seahorse, ISBN: 0-439-11014-9

Frueh, Mark. Sing With Me: If You’re Happy and You Know It, ISBN: 0-7853-0377-4

Gibbons, Gail. Coral Reefs, ISBN: 978-0-8234-2080-3

Gibbons, Gail. Sea Turtles, ISBN 10: 082341373 X

Gibbons, Gail. Sharks, ISBN 10: 0823410684

Gibbons, Gail. Surrounded By the Sea, ISBN: 0-316-30961-3

Gibbons, Gail. Whales, ISBN 10: 0823410307

Gordon, Sharon. Now I Know: Dolphins and Porpoises, ISBN: 0-8167-0443-0

Hartman, Jack. Over in the Ocean, ISBN: 0-9674913-0-4

Hayes, Geoffrey. Patrick and Ted at the Beach, ISBN –394-87289-4

Hill, Eric. Spot Goes to the Beach, ISBN 0-14-055281-2

Hirschmann, Kris. Ocean Hunters, ISBN: 0-8167-6948-6

Horst, Jerald and Mike Lane. Angler’s Guide to Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico, ISBN 978-1-58980-388-6

Houghton, Sue. Life Story: Dolphins

Hubbell, Patricia. Sand, Sea, Me!, ISBN: 0-439-382230-0

Hulme, Joy N. Sea Squares, ISBN: 1-56282-520-8

Hutchings, Amy and Richard. Our Day at the Seashore, ISBN: 0-43922353-9

Irons, Calvin. Shiny Shells, ISBN 0-7327-0252-6

Irons, Rosemary Reuille and Calvin. Fish for Supper, ISBN: 0-7312-0084-5

James, Brian. The Shark Who Was Afraid of Everything, ISBN: 0-439-36865-0

Jeunesse, Gallimard, Clause Delafosse, and Sabine Krawczyk. Fish, ISBN: 0-590-38155-5


 

Kalman, Bobbie. A B Sea, ISBN: 086505-725-7

Kranking, Kathleen W. The Ocean Is…, ISBN: 061851400-7

Lakeshore Learning. Life in the Sea, ISBN: 1-58970-415-0

Landry, Sarah. Fishes, ISBN: 0-394-44095-5

Lauber, Patricia. Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs, ISBN: 0-06-445130-5

Leonhardt, Alice. Ocean Life: Tide Pool Creatures, ISBN: 0-7398-0869-9

Lionni, Leo. Fish is Fish, ISBN: 0-394-82799-6

Lionni, Leo. Swimmy, ISBN: 0-590-43049-1

Llewellyn, Claire. Awesome Facts About Sharks, ISBN: 1-57755-571-6

Lloyd, Sam. Shark Trouble, ISBN: 0-439-66994-4

Marshall, Janet Perry. My Camera: At the Aquarium, ISBN: 0-316-54713-1

McCauley, Jane R. Let’s Explore a River (National Geographic Society), ISBN: 0-870-44741-6

McDonald, Megan. Is This a House for Hermit Crab?, ISBN: 0-15-305766-1

McDonald, Suse. Sea Shapes, ISBN: 0-15-201700-3

McMillan, Bruce. Going on a Whale Watch, ISBN: 0-590-5-45769-1

O’Brien, Teresa. Animals of the Ocean, ISBN: 1-884628-08-7

Palazza-Craig, Janet. I Can Read About: Manatees, ISBN: 0-8167-4718-0

Pallotta, Jerry. The Ocean Alphabet Book, ISBN: 0-590-31959-0

Pallotta, Jerry. The Underwater Alphabet Book, ISBN 10: 0-88106-455-6

Permenter, Dana Norsworthy. Fishing For Fun, La. Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries Aquatic Education Section

Pinnington, Andrea. Who Lives In The Sea?, ISBN: 0-312-49172-7

Pledger, Maurice. In The Ocean, ISBN: 1-57145-453-5

Poitier, Anton. Who Am I? IN THE OCEAN, ISBN 10: 0-7607-6735-1

Raffi, and Debi Pike. Baby Beluga, ISBN: 0-517-58362-3

Reasoner, Charles. Who’s in the Sea?, ISBN: 0-8431-3912-9

Rey, Margret and H. A. Curious George Goes to the Aquarium, ISBN: 0-395-36628-3

Rey, Margret and H.A. Curious George Goes to the Beach, ISBN 0-395-97838-6

Rice, Dona. The Sea, ISBN: 0-7439-8524-9

Rius, Maria and J. M. Parramon. Let’s Discover the Seaside, ISBN: 0-8120-3699-9

Royston, Angela. Sea Animals, IBSN: 0-689-71565-X

Schwartz, David M. At the Seashore, ISBN 1-57471-209-8

Serventy, Vincent. Animals in the Wild: Whale and Dolphin, IBSN: 0-590-40227-7

Sloan, Peter and Sheryl, In the Sea, ISBN: 0-7608-0543-1

Usborne First Nature. Fishes, ISBN: 0-86020-626-2


 

Vasiliu, Mircea. A Day at the Beach, ISBN 0-394-83475-4

Wilson, Lynn. Sharks, ISBN: 0-448-40301-3

Wood, Audrey. Ten Little Fish, ISBN: 0-439-84933-0

Wood, Audrey. The Deep Blue Sea: A Book of Colors, ISBN: 0-439-75382-1

World of Knowledge. The Sea, ISBN: 1-56144-609-2

Yektai, Niki. Bears at the Beach: Counting 10 to 20, ISBN 0-7613-0047-3

Zolotow, Charlotte. The Seashore Book, ISBN: 0-06-443364-1

 

Recordings/CDs

 

Anna Moo. Anne Moo Crackers

Dr. Jean. Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs

Dr. Jean. Just for Fun

Dr. Jean. Keep on Singing and Dancing with Dr. Jean

Growing Minds with Music. Nature Sounds

Johnette Downing. Music Time

Johnette Downing. Wild and Wooly Wiggle Songs

Johnette Downing.  Fins and Grins

Jack Hartman. Word Fiesta

Jack Hartman. Rhymin’ to the Beat, Volume 2

 

 

Website Resources

 

www.indwes.edu/Faculty/bcupp/sound/sound.htm - Sounds of the Sea

http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/gallery/sound/sound.html - Sound in the Sea Gallery


Unit 10-6:  Louisiana

Study Focus:  Sea Life and Summer (week 2 of 2)

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on the Gulf of Mexico habitat and the animals that live in and around the Gulf Coast.

Student Understandings: Students will understand that the Gulf of Mexico is a body of salt water bordering the southern coast of Louisiana. Students will understand that animals live in and around the Gulf of Mexico. Students will understand that the Gulf of Mexico is a place where many people fish for pleasure and work. Students will understand that many people travel to Gulf beaches in the summer.

Guiding Questions:

1.      Can students locate the Gulf of Mexico on a Louisiana map?

2.      Can students identify some of the animals living in or around the Louisiana Gulf coast?

3.      Can students appreciate the work of fisherman and that fishing can be a fun sport?

4.      Can students understand that the Gulf of Mexico beaches are a travel destination?

Guiding Vocabulary: Gulf of Mexico, coast, beach, waves, tide, sand, shells, marine biologist, shark, porpoise, stingray, redfish, shrimp, oyster, crab, nets, fishing poles, rod and reel, bait, shells

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)


 

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where)  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)


 

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)


 

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)


 

 Study Focus

 

Where is the Sea?

Let’s Go Fishing

Catching Fish

Let’s Visit the Beach

Beach Fun

Whole Group Activities

Sailor Went to Sea

ELA 1a, 4, 7, 18, 27, 28; M 13

Fish Tales

ELA 8, 10, 15, 16, 22, 24; M 1; SCI 20, 22

Did You Ever Go Fishing?

ELA 9, 10, 14c, 22, 24, 28; M 13

Going to the Beach

ELA 8, 9, 10, 16, 27; M 13; SCI 1, 2, 3, 20, 22

A Day at the Beach

ELA 9, 10, 12b, 12c, 16, 24, 26; SCI 2, 3, 13, 14

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Have you been to the sea?

Have you been fishing?

Did you catch a fish?

Have you been to the beach?

Have you found a shell at the beach?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

 

A Swim Through the Sea

 

Somewhere in the Ocean

 

Life in the Sea

 

Patrick and Ted at the Beach

 

Sea Creatures and Life in the Sea

Small Group Activities

Sprinkles in the Sand

ELA 3a, 3b, 4, 24; SCI 1, 2, 3

Water and Sand Mixing

ELA 24; M 6; SCI 1, 2, 3, 13, 14, 25

“If I Were a Fish” LEARNING LOG

ELA 1a, 9, 10, 11, 17, 18, 19; SCI 20, 22

Shells

ELA 16, 18; M 5, 6, 9; SCI 1, 2, 3, 22

Sea Life RAFT

ELA 1d, 6, 15, 17, 19, 20, 24; SCI 22

Music and Movement

movement with blue fabric to simulate waves to dance along with classical music, ocean drum, sand blocks, sand shakers, strips of blue fabric or scarves for wave dancing

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

fisherman/woman; biologist; boat owner with boat; trip to aquarium; fish store owner; trip to fish store or pet store; trip to the Gulf of Mexico


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in different multi-sensory ways. Since different sequences are used by individual teachers,  insert the letter that is being introduced and change the letter each week.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Play dough letters

Letter jars

Dot letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Cut a fish bowl shape from construction paper. Have students use a spinner or die, then count plastic or paper fish into the fish bowl.

Measurement

Bring in fish from the fish market and have students weigh them on the balance scale to compare the sizes of the fish.

Geometry

Have students use pattern blocks to create a fish.

Data Collection

BLM Graph:

Color Fish

Patterning

Have students use different colored paper fish to create fish patterns.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5, 17, 21, 22, 24,

26, 31

M 6, 9, 11

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

Sand (book)

jars with sand and water for mixing and observation

seashells-a variety of sizes and shapes for comparisons; starfish

Louisiana coastal or waterway map

fishing lures with a pan balance to  weigh and measure

measuring tape

fish photos

a  wave bottle for wave simulation

Gross Motor

ELA 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

Fish, Fish, Shark (like Duck, Duck, Goose)

Art - fish beach scene- paint a beach scene on butcher paper outdoors

fishing poles and magnetic fish for fishing

bathing suit relay game- a variety of different sizes of bathing suits on both ends. Have students race to put on suits then run to other end.

beach ball and volleyball

water painting - Have students dip paint brushes in water that is in a bucket or pail to paint the building outside.

boat or pirogue (actual or box boat); oars and paddles


 

Blocks

ELA 14

M 1,2,3,5,6,8,9,10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16

SS 1, 2

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student made signs and labels

Louisiana map, ice chest, fishing poles, magnetic fish, cars/trucks,plastic or rubber fish and crabs; fishing net or scoop, measuring tape

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 14

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

Matching Fish cut-outs - number fish 1-10 with corresponding fish with 1-10 dots or stickers on them

wooden, rubber, or plastic  fish counters for counting, sorting, or patterning with “water”  or fishbowl counting mats

fish foamies in different sizes for sorting or seriation

matching or sorting real sea shells

graduated ordering of fishing weights, fishing lures for patterning or sorting

Dollar Store fish erasers for counting, sorting, patterning, fish puzzles, Go Fish card game

plastic fish bowl and diecut fish shapes for counting game with number generators (dice)

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/under-the-sea/index.html

http://www.epa.gov/beaches/kids/game-matching.html

http://funschool.kaboose.com/preschool/art-activity-center/games/game_coloring_book_fun.html

http://www.uptoten.com/kids/kidsgames-mixedbag-shellspairs.html

http://www.uptoten.com/kids/boowakwala-family-seaside-sandcastle.html

Art

ELA 14

SCI 13,14

seashell prints; watercolor painting; watercolor drops on paper towels or coffee filters; real fish prints;

fish stamps, stickers or stencils;

sand art - colored sand; a variety of depths in babyfood jars and/or glue sand to create a beach scene;

painting prints with fishing lures;

fish collage-cutouts from fishing magazines, clipart, boardmaker, stickers, etc.

Sensory

ELA 14

M 6, 10, 11

SCI 3, 10, 13,14

Sand:

sand molds; sea shells; pails, buckets, shovels, wet and dry sand

 

Water:

blue food coloring; sea shells; plastic or rubber fish shapes; corks, bobs


 

Music

ELA 14

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 13

SCI 15, 17

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Going Bass Fishing - Anna Moo

Baby Fish, Five Fish Swimming in the Sea, Going Over the Sea, A Sailor Went to Sea,

Did You Ever Go Fishing - Dr. Jean

Fish Dance, Music of the Seas, Most Fish Swim - Johnette Downing:

Five Little Fish, Ten Little Fish, Over in the Ocean - Jack Hartman

 

Dramatic Play

ELA 27

M 5, 6,7,10, 11,

 

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

Beach Prop Box- beach basket; swim suits – variety of sizes for boys/girls; goggles; beach ball; beach towel; plastic crabs, fish; sunglasses; visors and sun hats; picnic basket with lunch food; empty sunscreen bottle; sea shells, pails, buckets, shovels

Books and Listening Center

ELA 4, 5,6, 7,8,9,10,11,12, 13,14, 25

 

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books;

magazines - Outdoor Life, Conservation, Louisiana Sportsman

Writing

ELA 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

beach and fish word cards; stamps; stencils; magazines - Outdoor Life, Conservation, Louisiana Sportsman

 

 

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Sailor Went to Sea (GLEs: ELA 1a, 4, 7, 18, 27, 28; M 13)

 

Materials List: Life in the Sea (book), A Sailor Went to Sea from Dr. Jean’s Silly Songs CD, word card with “Sea” and an illustration of waves (wavy lines) before the word for each student, word card with “See” written out and an illustration of eye before the word for each student, dry erase board, markers

 

Read the text and introduce the concept of the word “sea” as another way of referring to the ocean.  Write sea on the dry erase board and discuss the left to right progression of the letters as you write them.  Repeat the process using see.  Explain to the students that there are words that sound the same but are spelled differently.  Hand the word cards to each student and have them discuss the two spellings of  the words.  Explain that they are going to sing a song that uses both words and to hold the correct word card up as they sing.  Play the song from the CD and have the students hold

 

 

up the word cards as they sing along. After the children have participated in the song, ask the students to name other words that rhyme with sea or see (e.g., he, she, bee) and list the words on the board.

 

Accommodations:  Assist the students who have difficulty identifying the differences in the spelling of the two words.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Fish Tales (GLEs: ELA 8, 10, 15, 16, 22, 24; M 1; SCI 20, 22)

 

Materials List: Fish Eyes (book), fishing net, fish counters or plastic fish, chart paper, markers

 

Read the text and discuss the variety of fish shown in the text.  Highlight the fact that this particular text presents pictures of the fish with holes cut out of the page where their eyes are located and that the color of the eyes are determined by the colors of the fish on the previous or subsequent page.  Discuss the manner in which the book indicates how many fish are being presented in the book by placing numbers 1-10 in the top left hand corner of each page.  In preparation for the fishing trip, place the fish counters on the floor in the middle of the circle.  Tell the students that they are  going fishing and will write the number of fish caught on the chart paper.  Indicate that they will fish by using the fishing net to scoop up fish (the fish counters). Choose one student at a time to go fishing ( i.e., one scoop of the net). After the student scoops the fish, the other students will count how many fish have been caught.  The fisherman/woman will then write the total number of their catch on the chart paper.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty writing the number of their catch or who have difficulty using the fish net.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: Did You Ever Go Fishing? (GLEs: ELA 9, 10, 14c, 22, 24, 28; M 13)

 

Materials List: Fishing for Fun (book), Did You Ever Go Fishing? from Dr. Jean’s Silly Songs CD, actual fishing gear or photographs of fishing gear (rod/reel, fishing net, tackle box, bait bucket, first aid kit, life jacket), dry erase board and markers

 

Read the text and discuss the items needed for fishing and the fact that people fish for fun or to make a living.  Show the fishing gear and discuss the function of each item.  Ask the students if they have ever gone fishing?  If they have, with whom did they go? Discuss what the students caught or if they caught fish.  Play the song from the CD and have the students sing and dance to the music.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 


 

Whole Group Activity 4: Going to the Beach (GLEs: ELA 8, 9, 10, 16, 27; M 13; SCI 1, 2, 3, 20, 22)

 

Materials List: Out of the Ocean (book), Going to the Beach (sung to the tune of Going to the Zoo by Raffi), dry erase board and markers

 

Read the text, pausing to discuss the photographs that depict the various items that can be found on the beach, e.g., shells, sand, fishing gear, driftwood, shark’s teeth.  Inquire as to how many students have been to the beach and what they saw when they were there. List the items on the board as the students verbalize them. Tell the students we’re going to learn a song about going to the beach.” Teach the students the following song:

 

Mom and Dad

Are taking us to the beach tomorrow,

Beach tomorrow,

Beach tomorrow.

Mom and Dad

Are taking us to the beach tomorrow

And we can stay all day.

 

We’re going to the beach, beach, beach.

We’re going to the beach, beach, beach.

We’re going to the beach, beach, beach

And we can stay all day.  (chorus, to be repeated between each verse)

 

Look at all the waves

Crashing on the shore

Crashing on the shore,

Crashing on the shore.

Look at all the waves

Crashing on the shore,

And we can stay all day.

 

Repeat Chorus.

 

Look at all the gulls

Flying up and down,

Flying up and down,

Flying up and down.

Look at all the gulls

Flying up and down,

And we can stay all day.

 

Repeat Chorus.

 

Look at all the fishermen

Tossing out their lines,

Tossing out their lines,

Tossing out their lines.

Look at all the fishermen

Tossing out their lines,

And we can stay all day.

 

Repeat Chorus.

 

Look at all the people

Swimming in the surf,

Swimming in the surf,

Swimming in the surf.

Look at all the people

Swimming in the surf,

And we can stay all day.

 

Repeat Chorus.

 

Note:  Add as many verses as you choose, e.g., building sandcastles, walking on the beach, picking up sea shells.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 


 

Whole Group Activity 5: A Day at the Beach (GLEs: ELA 9, 10, 12b, 12c, 16, 24, 26; SCI 2, 3, 13, 14)

 

Materials List: A Day at the Beach (book), beach balls, sunglasses, beach towels, sunscreen, hats, sand tables, sand molds, beach shovels, beach buckets, water tables, cups, water wheels, blowing bubbles, swim suits (if allowed), small wading pools filled with sand or water (if allowed), dry erase board, markers, teacher-made sign indicating _________________________ Elementary School Beach, healthy snack or picnic lunch

 

Show the cover of the text.  Using a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions), ask the students to predict what the story line might be.  Write their predictions on the dry erase board.  Read the text, pausing where appropriate for questions and comments from the students.  At the conclusion of the read-aloud, ask the students if their predictions about the story line were correct and why or why not.  Tell the students, “I have a great day planned for you at _________________________ Elementary School Beach.”    Take the class outside to “The Beach” and encourage them to have fun exploring what to do while at the beach. [Teacher note:  This could serve as a culminating lesson/play day at the end of the year].

 

Accommodations: Parental permission slip; approval from the principal.

 

 

Small Group Activities

 

Small Group Activity 1: Sprinkles in the Sand   (GLEs: ELA 3a, 3b, 4, 24; SCI 1, 2, 3)

 

Materials List: Sand (book), bucket of sand, a piece of tagboard and a Styrofoam plate or tray for each student, glue, markers

 

Read the text discussing the properties of sand and the manner in which it is created.  Hand each student a Styrofoam plate or tray.  Allow each student to fill their plate/tray with sand.  Encourage the students to experiment with their fingers in the sand, e.g., lifting it up and having it filter through their fingers, sticking their fingers into it.  Show them how to write letters in the sand, create shapes in the sand, and how to smooth the sand out like an etch-a-sketch so that they can create new things.  Write each student’s name on a tag board and distribute the tag boards to each student.  Have the students trace their names with glue and then sprinkle the sand over the glue for a sand relief name card.  Allow the glue to dry so that the letters of their name will be covered with sand.  Dispense the excess sand into their Styrofoam plate/tray.  When their name card has dried, have each student show their name card and spell their names to the other members of the group.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty spelling their names or manipulating the sand and glue.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 2: Water and Sand Mixing   (GLEs: ELA 24; M 6; SCI 1, 2, 3, 13, 14, 25)

 

Materials List: bucket of sand, bucket of water, Styrofoam plate or aluminum pie container for each student, wet wipes, sand molds

 

Discuss the manner in which the beach has both wet and dry sand, i.e., the incoming tide wets the shoreline making sand that was once dry, wet.  Indicate that the tide comes in and out during the day and moves up the beach before it returns to the sea.  When the sand becomes wet, it becomes more compact.  Dry sand remains soft.  Allow each student to mix sand and water in their plate/pie container simulating wet sand at the beach.  Ask questions about the wet and dry sand as it is mixed: Which sand is heavy or light? Encourage the students to play with the wet sand, e.g., creating a mold, writing their names.  [Teacher note:  This activity is best suited as an outside activity.]

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 3: If I Were a Fish  (GLEs: ELA 1a, 9, 10, 11, 17, 18, 19; SCI 20, 22)

 

Materials List: If I Were a Fish (book) photographs of a variety of fishes taken from non-fiction books (e.g., Anglers Guide to the Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico), learning log page, markers, crayons

 

Show the students photographs of the various types of fish that inhabit the Gulf of Mexico.  Discuss their multiple colors and shapes and have the students choose the one they like the best.  Read the text to the students discussing the concept of “pretending” to be a fish.  Create a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions) by having the students fill in the name of their chosen fish in the blank for “If I were a fish in the sea, sea, sea, a ______________ is what I would be, be, be.”  Have the students draw and color the fish of their choosing on the learning log page.  Have the students share their learning log with the rest of the group.  Once each student has shared his/her work, collate the pages into a class book and place it in the science center. [Teacher note:  Prepare the learning log page prior to the activity by inserting the fill-in-the-blank statement at the top of the page].

 

Accommodations: Assist students who have difficulty writing the name of their chosen fish.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4: Shells (GLEs: ELA 16, 18; M 5, 6, 9; SCI 1, 2, 3, 22)

 

Materials List: Shiny Shells (book), What Lives in a Shell (book, pp. 18-31), a variety of real shells or photographs/die cut-outs of shells, dry erase board, markers

 

Read both texts highlighting the different shapes and sizes of the shells and the manner in which different types of animals once lived in some of the shells.  Distribute the shells amongst the students and lead a discussion that addresses their size, shape, texture, and feel.  Have the students organize and sort the shells from largest to smallest, from rough to smooth, from flat to round, from curved to straight and sort as same or different. List the descriptive words that were used on the dry erase board.  Upon completion, place the shells in the science center for further exploration.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Small Group Activity 5: Sea Life (GLEs: ELA 1d, 6, 15, 17, 19, 20, 24; SCI 22)

 

Materials List: Into the A, B, SEA (book), white paper, markers, crayons, word cards or pictures of a wide variety of sea life animals commonly found in the sea

 

Display the sea life pictures in the center of the circle rug.  Identify the contents of each picture and tell the students to choose an animal that they like the best.  To fulfill a modified RAFT (view literacy strategy descriptions), instruct the students to make a sign that describes the animal that they have chosen and that could be shown to beach visitors.

 

For this RAFT, students will do the following:

 

R – assume the role of the sea life animal

A – write/draw a sign for the audience of beach visitors

F – the form is a beach sign

T – the topic is name, drawing, and/or fact about the animal

 

Hand students a piece of white paper for their signs and have them write their names on the back.  Have the students draw a picture of the animal they chose on the front of the white paper.  If the students are able, they may copy the name of the animal chosen from the word or picture cards.  Have the students dictate the name of the animal that they are pretending to be and a fact that they know about that animal.  The teacher will then write the descriptors as dictated by the students on their respective signs.  Once all of the signs have been completed, have each student share their sign with other members of the group.  Organize all signs in a LEARNING LOG and place it in the science center.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty identifying a favorite animal, finding facts about their chosen animal, writing or drawing, or role playing the animal.

 


 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Small Group Activity 3:  Observe and document the student’s drawing and writing in the learning log page.

 

·         Small Group Activity 5:  Observe and document the student’s drawing and writing in the RAFT.

 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

 

Adams, Georgie, Fish Fish Fish, ISBN:0-8037-1208-1

Aliki. My Visit to the Aquarium, ISBN: 0-06-446186-6

Andreae, Giles. Commotion in the Ocean, ISBN: 0-439-08214-5

Archambault, John. The Birth of a Whale, ISBN: 1-58669-121-X

Arnosky, Jim. Turtle in the Sea, ISBN: 0-439-63609-4

Audubon Institute. The Institute, Summer 1992, A Publication of the Audubon Institute

Bassede, Francine. George’s Store at the Shore, ISBN: 0-439-13377-7

Bauer, David. Fish Facts, ISBN: 0-7398-5837-8

 

Berenstain, Stan. The Berenstain Bears By the Sea, ISBN: 0-679-88719-9

Berger, Gilda. Whales, ISBN: 0-385-23420-1

Brown, Marc. Arthur’s Family Vacation, ISBN: 0-590-31262-6

Canizares, Susan and Betsey Chessan. What Comes in a Shell, ISBN: 0-590-63878-5

Carle, Eric. A House for Hermit Crab, ISBN: 0-590-42567-6

Carle, Eric. Mister Seahorse, ISBN: 0-399-24269-4

Caver, Susan. If I Were a Fish, ISBN: 0-8136-8003-4

Chanko, Pamela. Sea Creatures, ISBN: 0-590-63880-7

Chinery, Michael. Life Story: Shark, ISBN: 0-8167-2105-X

Colandro, Lucille. There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Shell, ISBN: 0-439-81536-3

Cole, Sheila. When the Tide is Low, ISBN: 0-688-04067-7

Corrigan, Patricia. Sharks for Kids, ISBN: 1-55971-476-X

Craig, Janet. What’s Under the Ocean, ISBN: 0-89375-653-9

Curran, Eileen. Life in the Sea, ISBN: 0-8167-0448-1

Daynes, Katie. 1001 Things to Spot in the Sea, ISBN: 978079450229-4

Dickens, Lucy. My Sister and Me at the Beach, ISBN: 0-670-83927-2

Doubilet, Anne. Under the Sea from A to Z, ISBN: 0-590-48598-9

Educational Insights. My Picture Library: Fish

Edwards, Nicola and Jane Harris. Sand, ISBN: 0-7608-5086-0

Ehlert, Lois. Fish Eyes: A Book You Can Count On, ISBN: 0-15-228050-2

Fitzsimons, Cecilia. My First Fishes and Other Waterlife, ISBN: 0-06-021873-8

Foley, Cate. Let’s Go to the Aquarium, ISBN: 0-516-24503-1

Fotheringham, Nick and Susan Brunemeister. Beachcomber’s Guide to Gulf Coast Marine Life: Florida, Alabama,

         Mississippi, Louisiana, & Texas, ISBN: 0-87201-186-0

Frasier, Debra. Out of the Ocean, ISBN: 0-439-06301-9

Freymann, Saxton and Joost Elffers. One Lonely Seahorse, ISBN: 0-439-11014-9

Frueh, Mark. Sing With Me: If You’re Happy and You Know It, ISBN: 0-7853-0377-4

Garland, Peter. Vagabond Crabs, ISBN: 0-7901-0640-X

Gibbons, Gail. Coral Reefs, ISBN: 978-0-8234-2080-3

Gibbons, Gail. Sea Turtles, ISBN 10: 082341373 X

Gibbons, Gail. Sharks, ISBN 10: 0823410684

Gibbons, Gail. Surrounded By the Sea, ISBN: 0-316-30961-3

Gibbons, Gail. Whales, ISBN 10: 0823410307

Gordon, Sharon. Now I Know: Dolphins and Porpoises, ISBN: 0-8167-0443-0

Hartman, Jack. Over in the Ocean, ISBN: 0-9674913-0-4

Hayes, Geoffrey. Patrick and Ted at the Beach, ISBN: –394-87289-4

Hill, Eric. Spot Goes to the Beach, ISBN 0-14-055281-2

Hirschmann, Kris. Ocean Hunters, ISBN: 0-8167-6948-6

Horst, Jerald and Mike Lane. Angler’s Guide to Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico, ISBN: 978-1-58980-388-6

Houghton, Sue. Life Story: Dolphins

Hubbell, Patricia. Sand, Sea, Me!, ISBN: 0-439-382230-0

Hulme, Joy N. Sea Squares, ISBN: 1-56282-520-8

Hutchings, Amy and Richard. Our Day at the Seashore, ISBN: 0-43922353-9

Irons, Calvin. Shiny Shells, ISBN: 0-7327-0252-6

Irons, Rosemary Reuille and Calvin. Fish for Supper, ISBN: 0-7312-0084-5

James, Brian. The Shark Who Was Afraid of Everything, ISBN: 0-439-36865-0

Jeunesse, Gallimard, Clause Delafosse, and Sabine Krawczyk. Fish, ISBN: 0-590-38155-5

Kalan, Robert. Blue Sea, ISBN: 0-440-84979-9

Kalman, Bobbie. A B Sea, ISBN: 086505-725-7

Koch, Michelle. By the Sea, ISBN: 0-688-09549-6

Kranking, Kathleen W. The Ocean Is…, ISBN: 061851400-7

Lakeshore Learning. Life in the Sea, ISBN: 1-58970-415-0

Landry, Sarah. Fishes, ISBN: 0-394-44095-5

Lauber, Patricia. Who Eats What? Food Chains and Food Webs, ISBN: 0-06-445130-5

Leonhardt, Alice. Ocean Life: Tide Pool Creatures, ISBN: 0-7398-0869-9

Lionni, Leo. Fish is Fish, ISBN: 0-394-82799-6

Lionni, Leo. Swimmy, ISBN: 0-590-43049-1

Llewellyn, Claire. Awesome Facts About Sharks, ISBN: 1-57755-571-6

Lloyd, Sam. Shark Trouble, ISBN: 0-439-66994-4

Marshall, Jane Perry. My Camera at the Aquarium, ISBN: 0-316-54713-1

McCauley, Jane R. Let’s Explore a River (National Geographic Society), ISBN: 0-870-44741-6

McDonald, Megan. Is This a House for Hermit Crab?, ISBN: 0-15-305766-1

McDonald, Suse. Sea Shapes, ISBN: 0-15-201700-3

McMillan, Bruce. Going on a Whale Watch, ISBN: 0-590-5-45769-1

Metzger, Steve. Five Little Sharks Swimming in the Sea. ISBN: 0-439-59228-3

O’Brien, Teresa. Animals of the Ocean, ISBN: 1-884628-08-7

Palazza-Craig, Janet. I Can Read About: Manatees, ISBN: 0-8167-4718-0

Pallotta, Jerry. The Ocean Alphabet Book, ISBN: 0-590-31959-0

Pallotta, Jerry. The Underwater Alphabet Book, ISBN 10: 0-88106-455-6

Pascoe, Gwen, and Craig Foster-Lynam. SAND, ISBN: 0-88679-554-0

Permenter, Dana Norsworthy. Fishing For Fun, La. Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries Aquatic Education Section

Pinnington, Andrea. Who Lives In The Sea?, ISBN: 0-312-49172-7

Pledger, Maurice. In The Ocean, ISBN: 1-57145-453-5

Poitier, Anton. Who Am I? IN THE OCEAN, ISBN: 10: 0-7607-6735-1

Pratt, Kristin Joy. A Swim Through the Sea, ISBN: 1-883220-03-3

Raffi, and Debi Pike. Baby Beluga, ISBN: 0-517-58362-3

Reasoner, Charles. Who’s in the Sea?, ISBN: 0-8431-3912-9

Rey, Margret and H. A. Curious George Goes to the Aquarium, ISBN: 0-395-36628-3

Rey, Margret and H.A. Curious George Goes to the Beach, ISBN: 0-395-97838-6

Rice, Dona. The Sea, ISBN: 0-7439-8524-9

Rius, Maria and J. M. Parramon. Habitats: Life in the Sea, ISBN: 0-8120-3865-7

Rius, Maria and J. M. Parramon. Let’s Discover the Seaside, ISBN: 0-8120-3699-9

Rose, Deborah Lee. Into the A, B, Sea, ISBN: 0-439-09697-9

Royston, Angela. Sea Animals, IBSN: 0-689-71565-X

Schwartz, David M. At the Seashore, ISBN: 1-57471-209-8

Serventy, Vincent. Animals in the Wild: Whale and Dolphin, IBSN: 0-590-40227-7

Sloan, Peter and Sheryl, In the Sea, ISBN: 0-7608-0543-1

Tate, Suzanne. Sammy Shrimp, ISBN: 1-878405-00-4

Usborne First Nature. Fishes, ISBN: 0-86020-626-2

Vasiliu, Mircea. A Day at the Beach, ISBN: 0-394-83475-4

Ward, Jennifer, and T. J. Marsh. Somewhere in the Ocean, ISBN: 0-439-28515-1

Wilson, Lynn. Sharks! ISBN: 0-448-40301-3

Wood, Audrey. Ten Little Fish, ISBN: 0-439-84933-0

Wood, Audrey. The Deep Blue Sea: A Book of Colors, ISBN: 0-439-75382-1

World of Knowledge. The Sea, ISBN: 1-56144-609-2

Yektai, Niki. Bears at the Beach: Counting 10 to 20, ISBN: 0-7613-0047-3

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner. What Lives in a Shell?, ISBN: 0-06-445124-0

Zolotow, Charlotte. The Seashore Book, ISBN: 0-06-443364-1

 

Recordings/CDs

 

Anna Moo. Anne Moo Crackers

Dr. Jean. Dr. Jean Sings Silly Songs

Dr. Jean. Just for Fun

Dr. Jean. Keep on Singing and Dancing with Dr. Jean

Jack Hartman. Rhymin’ to the Beat, Volume 2

Jack Hartman. Word Fiesta

Johnette Downing.  Fins and Grins

Johnette Downing. Music Time

Johnette Downing. Wild and Wooly Wiggle Songs