Unit 1-1:  My School

Study Focus:  Welcome to School

Study Focus Description:  This study focuses on introducing students to their school and school rules.

Student Understandings: Students will develop an understanding of how rules keep the school and classroom safe places to play and learn. Students will learn where important places in the school and classroom are located and the appropriate procedures to use within those places. 

Guiding Questions:

1.       Can students understand what a rule is?

2.       Can students identify rules that help keep the classroom safe?

3.       Can students identify rules that help keep the school safe?

4.       Can students locate various places in the classroom?

5.       Can students locate various places in the school?

Guiding Vocabulary:  school, rule, inside voice, walking feet, learning center, learning center names (e.g., Science, Blocks), cafeteria, office, library, playground, teacher, paraprofessional

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)


ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)


 

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)


ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)


 

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Study Focus

 

Welcome to School

This is My School

Things at School

Our Centers

Our Rules

Whole Group Activities

 School Tour

ELA 16, 18, 24; SS 2,3

School Hunt

ELA 23, 24, 27

What’s Missing

ELA  23, 24

What Center is This?

ELA 4,  23, 24, 27, 29

Rule Chart

ELA 4, 16, 18, 29

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

This is the Way We Walk to School

ELA 27; M 13

Where, oh Where?

ELA 23, 24, 29; M 13

Thumbs Up,

Thumbs Down

ELA 23, 24, 27, 29; M 13

Susie Goes to School

ELA 23, 24, 27, 29; M 13

How Many?

M 1, 4

Storytime

Suggested

alternative story titles are listed in

the bibliography)

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

My New School by Scholastic Publishers

Let’s Go to School by Troll Associates

Clifford’s First School Day by Norman Bridwell

Curious George Goes to School by Margaret HA Reyes

If You Take a Mouse to School by Laura Numeroff

Small Group Activities

Teacher and paraprofessional will sit in each center with a small group of students and teach the rules for centers as each small group plays (e.g., build blocks to chin, write on paper only, clean up before you leave center)

Music and Movement

Introduce Scarves

Rhythm Sticks

Marching

Scarves

Rhythm Sticks

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

School tour, principal             

                                                                                                                           


 


Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can You Find the Letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough Letters

Letter  jars

Dot Letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel Board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

crayon box, crayons, and die:  Have students roll die count the number of dots and put that number of crayons in the box.

Measurement Sharpen 4 pencils to different lengths. Have students compare the lengths of the pencils and line them up from shortest to longest.

Geometry

Cut out construction paper shapes in different sizes and have students collage them on blank paper discuss names of shapes.

Data Collection

BLM Graph:  How Did You Come To School Today?

Patterning

Use a variety of crayons and colored pencils to have students sort by colors.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

photographs of students to view with magnifying glasses,

magnetic items and magnet wands,

a variety of mirrors for self-examination, and

a map of the school for observation

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

in addition to a variety of outdoor centers add: hula hoops, balls, frisbees

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student made signs and labels

wooden blocks, multicultural people, large cardboard blocks, cars, trucks—add children and schoolhouse,

a map of the school, names of places in the school with photographs attached to wooden blocks to be used for block props


 

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 3

SCI 9

SS 4

plastic children counters (with a die or number cards for sorting or counting),

connect-a-people (for sorting or counting),

Ellison die machine cut-outs (for sorting, counting, or matching)-school, boy, and girl shapes for sorting,

buses (with numerals one to ten on them for numerical order),

puzzles with children,

small colored blocks (for building, sorting, counting, or patterning)

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://www.learning.luton.gov.uk/l2g/custom/resources_ftp/netmedia_std/ks1/ict/mouse/index.htm 

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

collage materials, marble painting, dot marker painting,

tear and paste (colored construction paper to be torn and glued to white paper),

Ellison machine cut-outs of school houses, buses, boys, and girls (for gluing),

stencil of children, school houses, and buses (for rubbing or tracing)

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

add school buses and plastic children

 

Water:

cups, sieves, buckets, measuring cups

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Introduce scarves and rhythm sticks

Some featured songs:

Walk to School, Rules Rap, I Like You, There’s No Doubt About It, The More We Get Together, The First 12 Days of School - Raffi

Welcome, Get Ready, Look at Me - Dr. Jean

First Day of School - Jack Hartman and Becky Bailey

Friends Forever - Greg and Steve

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

multicultural dolls and small children figures, cooking set, duster, mop, broom, telephones, writing utensils, note pads

Prop Box: School Room Theme- telephone, notepad, backpack, lunch kit, nametags, photographs of the school and school workers


 

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

A variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class-made books

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as: pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

stencils: children, schoolhouse, adults

stamps: children, happy faces, school name stamp

writing cards: student’s names, school name, PreK

 

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1: School Tour (GLEs: ELA 16, 18, 24; SS 2,3)

 

Materials List: camera, photographs of key areas of the school, dry erase board and markers, paper, and binding

 

Prior to this lesson, the teacher will take pictures of various areas of the school with a camera.  The teacher will have the photographs ready to show the students as they name a place that they visited after the tour. 

 

Take students on a tour of the school site to develop an awareness of their immediate world. The school tour could include the school office, the library, the cafeteria, and the nurse’s office.  Following the school tour, students will help make a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) to document their school trip. In this lesson you will use a story chain which is a sequencing activity. Begin the story chain by asking student to recall each place visited on the school tour. Using guiding questions, have students name each school locations visited and record student responses on the board. Display the photographs showing each location.  Invite individual students to select the photograph depicting each location in the order it was visited.  As each student comes forward with a photograph, have him/her state the location and the order in which it was visited. (e.g. “We went to the school office first.” or “We went to the cafeteria second.”) These photographs could also be used to make a class book of the school tour. The book could be entitled, “Our School, ___________.” The book should then be shared with the children by placing it in the book center.

 

Accommodations: Assist students who are unable to recall the correct order or name of the school site.

 

 


 

Whole Group Activity 2: School Hunt (GLEs: ELA 23, 24, 27)  

 

Materials List: none

 

Going on a School Hunt is a take on Going on a Bear Hunt. Have the students sit in a circle and show them how to slap their knees and clap their hands to the beat. This is an echo call game. The teacher will say the first recurring line.  The students will then repeat the line that the teacher says.

 

Going on a school hunt,

Going on a school hunt, 

Are you ready? -Okay

Let’s go.

 

I see ______________________ (school name)  

I see ______________________ (school name)

Can’ go over it, can’t go under it,

Must go in it, Okay, Let’s go.           (Pantomime opening school door.)

 

I see a hallway,

I see a hallway,

Can’t go over it, can’t go under it,

Must walk in it, Okay, Let’s go?      (Pantomime walking down hallway.) – Hands slapping on legs.

 

I see our classroom,

I see our classroom.

Can’t go over it, can’t go under it,

Let’s go and sign in. Okay, let’s go.             (Pantomime how your students sign in daily.)

 

I see a cubby,

I see a cubby,

Can’t go over it, can’t go under it,

Let’s put our book bag in it.

Okay, let’s go.                                   (Pantomime putting book bag in cubby.)

 

I see our circle area.

I see our circle area.

Can’t go over it, can’t go under it.

Let’s sit down. Okay, let’s go.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: What’s Missing? (GLEs: ELA 23, 24)

 

Materials List: tray, 10 items found in the classroom (1 from each center), e.g., marker, pencil, small book, small stuffed animal, block, piece of paper, paintbrush, binoculars, piece of pretend food, a cover for the tray

 

Open the lesson with a discussion about the various items found in school everyday. State, “We are going to play a game that includes school items.” Show the tray to the students and name the items on the tray. Have them study and observe it, and then have them close their eyes. While their eyes are closed, take one item away. Have the students open their eyes and ask them, “What’s missing?” Allow time for the students to identify what is missing.  Do this two times to give every student a chance.

 

Accommodations: Have other students help when a child cannot guess the answer or limit the number of items on the tray to five items if students are having difficulty.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4: What Center Is This? (GLEs: ELA 4, 23, 24, 27, 29)

 

Materials List: cards with each center’s picture and center name printed on it, a professor know-it-all head gear

 

Tell the students, “We are going to play professor know-it-all (view literacy strategy descriptions). Professor know-it-all is a strategy in which students have a chance to show the class their knowledge on a subject by standing in front of the class and answering a question or giving information to the class. The teacher will choose a student to come to the front of the group.  The student will wear a mortar board, a hat, or a crown of your choice during this activity.  The teacher will read one of the rhymes listed below.  The student (Professor Know it All) will try to guess the correct center.  When the student guesses correctly, the teacher will show the card with the correct center’s name on it. Continue this process until each student has had a turn to guess a center.

 

This center is where students like to read.

It hold books on shelves.

What center is it?

 

This center is where students like to write.

It has pencils, markers, and crayons.

What center is it?

 

This center is where children build.

It has blocks, cars, and trucks,

What center is it?

 

This center is where children like to act.

It has dress up clothes, dolls, and cooking utensils.

What center is it?

 

This center is where children play in sand and water.

It has sand, water, cups, buckets, and spoons.

What center is it?

 

This center is where children play with number activities.

It has puzzles, sorters, counters, and lacing activities.

What center is it?

 

Accommodations: Have other students help when a student cannot guess the answer.

 

Whole Group Activity 5:  Rule Chart (GLEs: ELA 4, 16, 18, 29)

 

Materials List: chart paper, markers, index cards, picture symbols of the rules

 

Say, “This week during small group we have been discussing rules for class and rules for our school. Today we will brainstorm (view literacy strategy descriptions) a list of rules for our classroom and for our school.”  Have the students recall the rules they have learned and read the rules as you write the rules on the index cards with a picture on each card. For each rule, ask students, “Is this a school rule or a classroom rule?” Then put the card in the correct column of the rule chart (see diagram below). Examples of rules may include: Walk in hallway, sit for story time, stand in line for lunch, and be quiet in hallway.

           Classroom

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

School Rules

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

 

 

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accommodations: None needed.

 

Morning Circle Activities

 

During the first two weeks of school, Morning Circle should be a time for getting to know the students and helping them learn how to be in a group setting. It’s also a good time for helping students learn classmates’ names. More routine types of morning circle activities such as morning message or calendar should be introduced in the following weeks of school.

 

 

Morning Circle Activity 1: This is the Way (GLEs: ELA 27; M 13)

 

Materials List: none

 

Students will stand and move around the circle according to the words of the song.

 

(tune: Mulberry Bush)

This is the way we walk to school, walk to school, walk to school.

This is the way we walk to school, so early in the morning.

 

This is the way we hop to school …

 

This is the way we march to school …

 

This is the way we jump to school…

 

This is the way we tippy-toe to school…

 

This is the way we giant step to school…

 

Accommodations: None needed

 

 


 

Morning Circle Activity 2:  Where, oh, Where? (GLEs: ELA 23, 24, 29; M 13)

 

Materials List: block from the block center, marker from the writing center, book from the book center, puzzle from the table toy center, binoculars from the science center, dish from the dramatic play center, cup from the sand center.

 

Place each of the materials cited above in the appropriate centers.  While singing the song “Where, oh, Where?” identify a specific item from the list above (changing items with each verse of the song).  Call a student’s name.  The student will go to the designated center and retrieve the item that has been identified. 

 

(tune: “Paw, Paw, Patch”)

Where, oh, where is a block from the block center?

Where, oh, where is a block from the block center?

Where, oh, where is a block from the block center?

_________ can you get me one?

 

Repeat this process using a different student and different item. 

 

Accommodations:  Assist the students who have trouble finding either the center or the item called.

 

 

Morning Circle Activity 3: Thumbs Up, Thumbs Down (GLEs: ELA 23, 24, 27, 29; M 13)

 

Materials List:  none

 

This is a guessing game involving student behaviors.  Ask the students a series of questions about school behaviors.  Students respond to these questions with a “thumbs up” if it is the right action or a “thumbs down” if it is the wrong action.

 

Examples of student behaviors may include running in the classroom, taking a toy from a child, sitting for story, waiting in line, cleaning up after centers. This activity may be continued during center time and during small group activities.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who do not understand specific behaviors. 

 

 


 

Morning Circle Activity 4: Susie Goes To School (GLEs: ELA 23, 24, 27, 29; M 13)

 

Materials List:  none

 

Start the game by choosing a student to stand in front of the group.  Lead the class in singing the song, repeating the song until each student has had his or her turn to be in the front of the group.

 

(tune: “Farmer in the Dell”)

_Susie ____ goes to school,

__________goes to school,

High, ho, the Derry oh,

__________ goes to school.    Susie picks another child, who stands up front and then sing---

 

 

__Harry___ goes to school.

__________ goes to school.

High, ho, the Derry oh,

__________ goes to school.  Repeat until all students have a turn. Then close with—

 

We all go to school.

We all go to school.

High, ho, the Derry, oh,

We all go to school.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

Morning Circle Activity 5: How Many? (GLEs: M 1, 4)

 

Materials List: 5 laminated school house cutouts (Ellison machine or small calendar Die-cuts), numbers 1 to 5

 

Tell the students, “We are going to play a counting game.”  Place laminated cut-outs in varying numbers on the floor. Ask the children, “How many?”  Give students a chance to count and respond with the correct number.  Check the number by counting as a group. Begin the game again by having the students close their eyes and by using a different number of cutouts.  Use the numbers 1-5. If students are able you may extend this activity using the numbers 6 – 10.

 

Accommodations: Assist students who are having difficulty by counting with them. 

 

 

Sample Assessments

 

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products.  These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

 

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

 

 

 


 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

 

Ahlberg, Janet and Allan. Starting School, ISBN: 88-50053

Berger, Samantha. School, ISBN: 0-439-04553-3

Bourgeouis, Paulette and Clark, Brenda. Frankin’s New Friend. ISBN: 0-590-02592-9

Bourgeouis, Paulette and Clark, Brenda. Franklin Goes to School. ISBN: 0-590-25467-7

Bridwell, Norman. Clifford’s First School Day, ISBN: 0-439-08284-6

Bridwell, Norman. Clifford’s First School Day, ISBN: 0-439-08284-6

Bridwell, Norman. Clifford’s Pals. ISBN: 0-590-44295-3

Bunnett, Rochelle. Friends at School. ISBN: 0-590-97313-4

Canizares, Susan and Chessen, Betsey. How Many Can Play? ISBN: 0-439-04600-9

Civardi, Anne and Stephen Cartwright. Going To School, ISBN: 0-7460-1269-1

Cutting, Jillian. A Day at School, ISBN: 0-7802-3907-5

Cutting, Jillian. Going to School, ISBN: 0-7802-3906-7

dePaola, Tomie. The Three Friends Go to School. ISBN: 0-439-20742-8

Fisher Price. Back to School, ISBN: 0-7944-0677-7

Ford, Bernette. Hurry Up, ISBN: 0-439-56849-8

Fraser, Mary Ann. I.Q. Goes to School. ISBN: 0-439-57650-4

Hains, Harriet.  My New School. ISBN: 1-56458-116-0

Hale, Sarah Josepha. Mary Had a Little Lamb, ISBN: 0-8234-0509-2

Hallinan, P.K. A Rainbow of Friends. ISBN: 0-8249-5394-0

Hallinan, P.K. My First Day of School. ISBN 10: 0824953053

Hawthorne, Phillip and Nancy Tyler. There’s a Dragon at My School, ISBN: 9-780794-506940

Hennessy, B.G. School Days, ISBN: 0-590-47224-0

Hill, Eric. Spot Goes to School, ISBN: 0-399-21073-3

Hoffman, Phyllis.  We Play, ISBN: 0-590-44384-4

Jackson, Kim.  First Day of School, ISBN: 0-8167-0439-2

Korman, Justine. The Grumpy Bunny Goes to School. ISBN: 0-439-64433-X

Kuklin, Susan. Going to My Nursery School, ISBN: 0-02-751237-1

Kvasnosky, Laura. See You Later, Alligator. ISBN: 0-15-200301-0

Lawrence, Anne. Our School, ISBN: 0-395-74297-8

London, Jonathan. Froggy Goes to School. ISBN: 0-590-06693-5

Mackall, Dandi. First Day, ISBN: 0152165770

Numeroff, Laura. If You Take a Mouse to School. ISBN: 0-06-028328-9

Pinnell, Gay Su. School, ISBN: 0-439-13185-5

Reyes, Margret and H.A. Curious George Goes to School. ISBN: 0-395-51939-X

Reyes, Margret and H.A. Curious George: First Day of School, ISBN: 978-0-618-60565-1

Senisi, Ellen B. Kindergarten Kids. ISBN: 0-590-47614-9

Slater, Teddy. Stay in Line. ISBN: 0-590-22713-0

Troll Associates.  Let’s Go to School.

Williams, Rozanne. Five Little Monsters Went to School, ISBN: 1-57471-127-8

Winget, Susan. Tucker’s Best School Day. ISBN-13: 978-0-439-90084-3

Zoehfeld, Kathleen. Pooh’s First Day of School. ISBN: 0-590-28160-7

 

 

Children’s Music CDs and Recordings

 

Dr. Jean Feldman. All Day Long

Dr. Jean Feldman. Keep On Singing and Dancing with Dr. Jean

Dr. Jean Feldman. Is Everybody Happy?

Dr. Jean Feldman. Silly Songs

Greg and Steve. We All Live Together, Volume 5

Jack Hartman and Becky Bailey. It Starts in the Heart

Imagination Movers. Calling All Movers

Raffi. Rise and Shine


Unit 1-2:  My School

Study Focus:  School Workers and Friends

Study Focus Description:  This study focuses on introducing students to school workers and strategies for developing friendships.

Student Understandings:  Students will develop an understanding that schools need teachers, and workers.  School is a place where students can learn and make friends.

Guiding Questions:

1.       Can students understand what a friend is?

2.       Can students identify qualities of a friend?

3.       Can students understand who school workers are?

4.       Can students understand what different school workers jobs are?

Guiding Vocabulary:  principal, secretary, custodian, cafeteria technician, teacher, paraprofessional, librarian, and friend. Sharing, kind, cooperative

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)


 

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14b

Use simple reasoning skills by determining why something happens in a story read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)


 

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)


 

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 


 

 Study Focus

 

Our Principal

Who Cleans Our School

Our Office Workers

Who Cooks Our Food?

Our School Workers

Whole Group Activities

Principal

DR-TA

ELA 4, 6, 7, 27; SS 7; SCI 26

Maintenance Worker

ELA 4, 24, 27, 29; M 1

 School Secretary

ELA 4, 7, 15, 17, 24, 27, 29

Cafeteria

Technician

ELA 4, 14, 24, 27, 29; M 1, 2

School Worker Book

ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 11

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1a, 1b, 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13

SCI 26, 27

SS 4, 5, 7

My name is

_____. What is

your name?

ELA 23, 24, 29

Hickety-

Pickety, Bumble-bee

ELA 1a, 1b, 23, 24, 29

Little Red Box

ELA 3a, 23, 24, 29

Who Feels Happy at School Today?

ELA 23, 24, 29

10 Little Friends

ELA 23, 24, 29; M 1, 10

Storytime

(Suggested

alternative story titles are listed inthe bibliography)

ELA 1a, 1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Our School

Workers

 

Will I Have a Friend?

Clifford’s Best

Friends

Iris Sleeps Over

We Are All Alike, We

Are All Different

Small Group Activities

School Friendship Puzzle

ELA 4, 8, 9, 12b, 12c

Friendship Handprint Circle

ELA 16, 18, 24, 29

Friendship Book

ELA 15, 16, 17, 19, 24, 29

Color, Memory, and

Matching Game

ELA 24, 29; M 9

 

Friendship Chart

ELA 4, 5, 8, 9, 18, 22, 26

Music and Movement

Old Brass Wagon

If You’re Happy

Head, Shoulders

Old Brass Wagon

If You’re Happy

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Principal visit

 


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

Introduce letters to students in various multi-sensory ways. Sample activities are indicated below. Adjust the activities by inserting the letter(s) that is (are) being introduced and changing the letter(s) as needed.

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough Letters

Letter jars

Dot Letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel Board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

BLM: “Children at School” work mat.

 

Measurement

Have students choose a partner and stand back to back. Have students compare heights.  Swap partners and repeat.

 

Geometry

 BLM Friendship shape bracelet.

Data Collection BLM Graph:  How Many Girls and Boys Do We Have in Our Class?

Patterning

Have students make people patterns with the people block figures or photos of the students themselves.

Science

SCI 1,2,3,4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11,22,23,24,25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d,17,21,22,24,

26,31

M 6,9,11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools nonfiction books relating to current study,

balance scale with small plastic or rubber children to weigh, paper cut-outs of children to view, color paddles, plants, photographs of classmates, photographs of the school and of places in the school, map of the school

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

small balls, soccer balls, basketballs and basketball goal (in addition to the outside centers)

 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student made signs and labels

large wooden block set, multicultural people, cut out photographs of school workers with their names taped to blocks to make school block people, bristle blocks with photographs of school workers to be used as block prop people


 

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1,2,3,4,5,6,8, 9,10,11,13

SCI 9

SS 4

boy/girl die cut for patterning or sorting, connecting people, friends matching game (take a picture of each child in your class, make 2 copies of each picture and laminate), make school house counting game by die cutting 5 school houses, write one number on each school house using numbers 1-5 to use with children counters. If students are capable, add numbers 1-10.

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://pbskids.org/mamamirabelle/funstuff_friends.html

http://www.apples4theteacher.com/paper-doll.html

http://tre.ngfl.gov.uk/uploads/materials/16360/leckysfriends.swf

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

collage of children’s faces cut from magazines, cards, old photographs, or bulletin border, constructions paper, shape collage, cookie cutter children’s prints using paint, string painting, , school house and children cutouts from Ellison or Accucut machine for gluing.

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand: scoops, cups, buckets, rakes

Water: cups, buckets, corks and rocks

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Introduce bells and maracas.

Some featured songs:

My School Family, Caring Friends, Friendship Chant - Jack Hartman and Dr. Becky Bailey;

Hello Friend, Goodbye Friends, Special Me, Twinkle Friends, We Had a Good Day - Dr. Jean Feldman;

Wonderful Friends - Johnette Downing

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

cooking set, dish set, phones, phone book, food sets-including multicultural foods, purses, keys, money, musical instruments, writing implements, cameras

Prop Box: School House Theme- telephone, notepad, backpack, lunch kit, nametags, photographs of the school and school workers

Activities used during whole group time may be added to the dramatic play center.


 

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus and puppets, flannel board stories, magnetic story pieces

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; variety of writing tools such as: pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

stencils: children, school, adults, houses

stamps: happy face, variety of children

writing cards: student names, school name, teachers’ names, Pre-K

 

 

Whole Group Activities

 

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Principal (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 7, 27; SS 7; SCI 26)

 

Materials List:  School Helpers (book), photograph of the principal, student desk, telephone

 

This book is titled School Helpers. Follow a modified DR-TA (view literacy strategy descriptions): A modified DR-TA (Directed Reading-Thinking Activity) is a literacy strategy that asks students to make predications about books and to check their predictions upon completion of the story. Can you predict who this book will be about? List the students’ responses. Read the book, School Helpers, to the students, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions and to check students’ predictions.  At the end of the read aloud, ask students if the story was what they expected. Why or why not? The teacher will state to the children, “This week, we will be talking about school workers, people who help our school work.  Our school, __________, has a school worker who is the leader of our school.  This worker is called the principal.  The principal is a school worker who talks to students, talks to parents, answers calls, and helps teachers.” Show the picture of the principal to the students and tell them the principal’s name. 

 

The teacher will tell the students, “Today, we will pretend to be the principal and do the things that the principal does.”  Examples of these tasks include delivering the morning announcements, speaking on the phone to parents, giving the weather report, speaking with students, etc.

 


 

Get a small student desk and have each child practice sitting in a big chair behind the desk or pretend to speak into the microphone saying, “Good morning students. Welcome to _ (name of school)__.  Today’s weather report calls for __________.” (morning announcements)

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who cannot remember names or who have difficulty making announcements to the group.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Maintenance Worker (GLEs: ELA 4, 24, 27, 29; M 1)

 

Materials List:  two trash cans, wadded-up pieces of paper, photograph of maintenance workers

 

The teacher will introduce the concept of the school worker known as “maintenance worker”.  The maintenance workers are the people who take care of the physical plant (the buildings) of our school. They keep it clean and in working order. Take a picture of your school’s maintenance workers and state their names to the class.  Let the students know that they can help the maintenance workers by picking up their own trash and picking up trash left behind by others.  Play the game known as “Throw the Trash in the Trash Can” by placing two trash cans in the middle of the circle of students.  Scatter 20 pieces of wadded-up paper thrown about the room and have each student throw trash into the trash can in the middle of the rug.  Count the number of trash pieces that make it in the trash can.  Repeat the game as many times as you’d like.

 

Accommodations:  Remind students who miss their first shot to pick up the trash and to try again.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: School Secretary (GLEs: ELA 4, 7, 15, 17, 24, 27, 29)

 

Materials List:  telephones, note pads, pencils

 

The teacher will introduce the concept of the “School Secretary.”  A school secretary a person who works in the school office, answers phones, speaks with students, assists parents, and copies materials used by the principal and teachers.  Take a picture of the School Secretary in your school. Show the picture to the students and tell them the school secretary’s name and what the job entails.

 

The teacher will tell the students that, “Today, we will pretend to be the School Secretary.”  Have several telephones, note pads, and pencils ready for the activity. Pass the phones around the circle and let the students practice saying, “Hello. This is (name of school) Elementary. May I help you?”  Demonstrate the manner in which the students can role play the various tasks of the “School Secretary with each other, e.g., assist parents, photocopy materials, answer phones and taking messages.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who are unable to remember the manner in which to answer the telephone or take notes.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 4: Cafeteria Workers (GLEs: ELA 4, 24, 27, 29; M 1, 2)

 

Materials List:  20 plastic or Styrofoam bowls, 20 plastic spoons, photograph of cafeteria workers, number cards 1-5

 

Introduce the concept of ‘cafeteria workers’.  Cafeteria workers are those who order the food from the store, prepare the food, cook the food, serve the food, and clean the dishes and cafeteria after students have eaten. Take a picture of the cafeteria workers at your school. Show the picture to the students and tell them each of the workers’ names, their titles, and the jobs that each of them does.  Tell the students, “Today, we will play a counting game called Mix it Up.  Hand each student a bowl and a spoon. Show all the students the number cards from 1-5 and have all of the students say, in unison, each number as it is shown.  When the number is shown, have each student stir their spoons in their bowls the corresponding number of times and call out each number as they stir.  Then place this activity in the dramatic play area when completed.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty: 1) stirring the spoon the correct number of times, 2) standing in line correctly, or 3) stirring and counting at the same time. If the students are capable, you may include the numerals 6 – 10.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 5: (school name)’s School Worker Book (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 11)

 

Materials List:  teacher-constructed photo book of school workers with accompanying names and titles

 

The teacher will compose a book that includes photographs, names, and titles of each respective group of school workers.  The teacher will read the rhyme described below (inserting the various groups of workers).  The students will respond by identifying the worker group which was depicted by the rhyme.  Once the worker group has been identified, the teacher will show the corresponding picture to the students.  Challenge the students to identify specific workers by name and title. 

 

I know a worker who works in our cafeteria.

They cook and clean.

Who are they?   (cafeteria workers)

--Say yes. Then show the children their pictures.

 

I know a school worker who works in our office.

They talk on the phone, help students, assist teachers.

Who are they?  (secretary)

--Say yes. Then show their pictures.

 

I know a school worker who works all around our school.

They clean our classrooms, bathrooms, and make our hallway floors shine.

Who are they?   (maintenance workers)

--Say yes. Then show their pictures.

 

I know a worker who is the leader of our school.

He/She solves problems, talks to students, parents, and teachers.

Who is it?  (principal)

--Say yes. Then show the picture.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty:  1) putting names with faces; 2) remembering the jobs of particular workers; 3) remembering the names of each group of workers.

 

 

Morning Circle Activities

 

 

Morning Circle Activity 1: My Name is _________? What is Your Name? (GLEs: ELA 23, 24, 29)

(Chant)

 

Materials List:  name cards for each student that includes their picture and name

 

The teacher will arrange the students in the morning circle.  The teacher will then sing the song while circulating around the circle, touching each student on their head as they are included in the song.  As the teacher progresses around the circle, the name card is shown to the rest of the class. Continue until all children have been identified. 

 

My name is (teacher’s name)?

What is your name? (student’s response with their name)

What is your name? (student’s response with their name)

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 


 

Morning Circle Activity 2: Hickety, Pickety, Bumble Bee (GLEs: ELA 1a, 1b, 23, 24, 29)

 

Materials List:  name cards for each student that includes their picture and name

 

The teacher will arrange the students in the morning circle.  The teacher will sing the song while circulating around the circle, touching each student on their head as they are included in the song.  As the teacher progresses around the circle, the name card is shown to the rest of the class.  Continue until all students have been identified.

 

Hickety, pickety, bumble bee,

Can you sing your name for me?

My name is ___________,

His name is ___________.

 

Accommodations:  none

 

 

Morning Circle Activity 3: Little Red Box (GLEs: ELA 3a, 23, 24, 29)

 

Materials List: use a box covered with red paper that will hold pictures of each student, name-cards with the students’ photographs

 

The teacher will have the students sitting in the morning circle holding their name-card with their photograph in front of them. Choose a student as the first participant.  Have the student stand, put his/her picture in the little red box, and sing the song with that student.  Once this process has been completed, have that student identify another participant by going to get a classmate by the hand.  The new participant then puts his/her picture in the little red box. The teacher sings the song with the student.  Continue with this process until all students have had their turn.  Once the game has been completed, have one of the students place the little red box (with all pictures inside) in the music center.

 

I wish I had a little red box,

To put (name of student) in.

I’d take him/her out and go, “kiss, kiss, kiss” (blow kisses at the picture)

And put him/her back again.

 

Accommodations:  None needed

 

 


 

Morning Circle Activity 4: Who Feels Happy at School Today? (GLEs: ELA 23, 24, 29)

 

The teacher will organize the students in the morning circle by having them stand.  The teacher will instruct the students that, “This is a movement song.  We will move as the words in the song instruct us to move.”

 

(to the tune of London Bridge)

 

Who feels happy at school today, school today, school today?

Who feels happy at school today?  (Chorus)

1.      Clap, clap your hands.

 

Repeat Chorus           

2.      Snap, snap your fingers.

 

Repeat Chorus

3.      Stomp, stomp your feet.

 

Repeat Chorus

4.      March, march in place.

 

Repeat Chorus

5.      Jump, jump up and down.

 

Repeat Chorus

6.      Shake a friend’s hand.

 

Repeat Chorus

7.      Hug a friend.

 

Accommodations: Allow students to move freely, but under control; assist students who have difficulty with specified movements

 

 


 

Morning Circle Activity 5: 10 Little Friends (GLEs: ELA 23, 24, 29; M 1, 10)

 

Materials List:  number cards 1-10

 

The teacher will organize the students in the morning circle by having them stand.  The teacher will then distribute number cards (1-10) to the first ten students in a clockwise progression.  The remaining students will be instructed to sing until it is their turn to hold one of the number cards.  While the teacher and all students sing the song, the teacher will tap each student holding a card (in numerical order) on the head.  Each student whose number is called will hold their number card above their head as the number is called.  Repeat until all students have had the opportunity to hold their number card above their head.

 

(to the tune of 10 Little Indians)

1 little, 2 little, 3 little friends,

4 little, 5 little, 6 little friends,

7 little, 8 little, 9 little friends,

10 little friends at school.

 

10 little, 9 little, 8 little friends,

7 little, 6 little, 5 little friends,

4 little, 3 little, 2 little friends,

1 little friend at school.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who do not recognize numbers.

 

 

Small Group Activities

 

 

Small Group Activity 1: School Friendship Puzzle (GLEs: ELA 4, 8, 9, 12b, 12c)

 

Materials List: Making Friends (book), 1 poster board cut into 20 jigsaw puzzle pieces, 1 poster board that will serve as the template for the puzzle pieces (i.e., the outline of each puzzle piece and how they all fit together), crayons, markers, and a whiteboard/chalkboard

 

Following a modified DR-TA strategy (view literacy strategy descriptions), the teacher will first share the title and cover of the book and then elicit predictions from students. Write the students’ predictions on the board. Read the book, Making Friends, to the students, pausing where appropriate


 

for questions and comments and to check students’ predictions.  The teacher will then use the material from the text to lead a discussion about friendship, i.e., working together, getting along with each other, playing well with others, meeting new people. Ask the students if their predictions about the story were correct. Have each student choose a puzzle piece, color it with their favorite color, and write their name on it.  Then have the students place their respective puzzle pieces on the floor in the middle of the circle.  The teacher and the students will work cooperatively to put the puzzle together as a whole group.  While the students are working on the puzzle, ask them how they are working together as friends to complete the puzzle together.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have trouble writing their names or write their names on the cards, if necessary, choosing their favorite color, waiting for their turn to put a puzzle piece on the board.

 

 

Small Group Activity 2: Friendship Handprint Circle (GLEs: ELA 16, 18, 24, 29)

 

Materials List:  chart paper, poster board, markers, paint, water, soap, and paper towels

 

The teacher will brainstorm (view literacy strategy descriptions) with the students about the qualities of friendship. Ask the students what makes a good friend. The teacher will list the qualities of friendship suggested by the students on the chart.  When the list has been completed, the teacher will read and discuss the qualities of friendship that have been identified.

 

The teacher will state that, “We are all friends in our classroom, in our school.  To demonstrate how this works, we are going to create a friendship handprint circle.  When the circle has been completed, we’ll all see how our hands work together to build a circle.”

 

Have each child dip their hand in paint and stamp their hands going around the poster board in a circular fashion.  Immediately after the student has stamped his/her handprint, the teacher will write the name of each student below the palm print.  Send the students to wash their hands upon completion of their handprint. Bring the students together to read their names around the handprint circle and display the circle in the classroom for further review.

 

Accommodations:  Assist the students who have difficulty putting their hands in the paint or keeping their hands to themselves.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 3: Friendship Book (GLEs: ELA 15, 16, 17, 19, 24, 29)

 

Materials List:  teacher made learning log page, crayons, and markers

 

Discuss the qualities of friendship during small group.  Ask the students to identify a new friend that they have made at school.  The teacher will tell the students that, “We’re going to make a class book on friendship.”  The teacher will give each student a piece of paper to create a learning log (view literacy strategy descriptions). A learning log is a literacy in which the students write or draw about a teacher prompt. The learning log page states “(another student’s name) is my friend because (state the reason for the friendship).”   When the students have completed their drawings, they will state their friend’s name and why he/she is considered to be their friend.  The teacher will record the students’ responses on the learning log page. Compile the pages into a class book to be placed in the book center.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who do not know the name of their friend or who do not know a reason for wanting them to be their friend.

 

 

Small Group Activity 4: Color, Memory, and Matching Game (GLEs: ELA 24, 29; M 9)

 

Materials List: 10 die-cut boys, one each cut from red, green, blue, yellow, brown, purple, white, black, orange, and pink construction paper; 10 Die-cut girls, one each taken from red, green, blue, yellow, brown, purple, white, black, orange, and pink construction paper; glue each individual Die-cut to a cardboard Lotto piece

 

The teacher will display the color matching pieces to the students and tell the students that, “Today, we’re going to play a color matching game.”  The teacher will place the matching pieces face down on the rug and tell the students that they may turn two pieces over at a time.  The student will have a ‘match’ when one boy and one girl of the same color are turned over at the same time.  The student will then keep the match.  Continue the process until all matches have been identified.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty waiting for their turn or who get frustrated because they cannot remember where the matching piece lies. Use 5 sets of matching cards rather than the whole set if the activity is too difficult.

 

 


 

Small Group Activity 5: Friendship Chart (GLEs: ELA 4, 5, 8, 9, 18, 22, 26)

 

Materials List:  poster board and markers, Bright Eyes, Brown Skin (book)

 

The teacher will read and discuss the text, Bright Eyes, Brown Skin, with the students.  The teacher will tell the students that, “We are going to make a chart about friendship.”  The teacher will then create the chart by placing the word “friends” in the middle of a poster board. The students will then be asked to provide examples of what friends do for each other (e.g., share, care, play, listen, and help). These examples will be written around the word ‘friends’ on the poster board.  When all students have had the opportunity to contribute, the teacher will summarize and discuss the chart with the class. Post the chart where students can see and refer to it later.

 

Accommodations:  Assist students who have difficulty identifying appropriate examples.

 

 

Sample Assessments

 

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products.  These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

 

 

 


Activity-Specific Assessments

 

 

 

 

Resources

 

Children’s Books

 

Berger, Samantha and Chanko, Pamela. School. ISBN: 0-439-04553-3

Bourgeouis, Paulette and Clark, Brenda. Frankin’s New Friend. ISBN: 0-590-02592-9

Bourgeouis, Paulette and Clark, Brenda. Franklin Goes to School. ISBN: 0-590-25467-7

Bridwell, Norman.  Clifford Makes a Friend, ISBN: 0-590-37930-5

Bridwell, Norman.  Clifford’s Best Friends, ISBN: 0-439-21997-3

Bridwell, Norman. Clifford’s Pals. ISBN:0-590-44295-3

Bunnett, Rochelle. Friends at School. ISBN: 0-590-97313-4

Canizares, Susan and Chessen, Betsey. How Many Can Play? ISBN: 0-439-04600-9

Cheltenham Elementary School Students.  We Are All Alike, We Are All Different, ISBN 10: 0439417805

Civardi, Anne and Stephen Cartwright. Going To School, ISBN: 0-7460-1269-1

Cohen, Miriam.  Will I Have a Friend? ISBN 10: 0689713339

Crews, Donald. School Bus. ISBN: 0-590-44153-1

dePaola, Tomie. The Three Friends Go to School. ISBN: 0-439-20742-8

Ford, Bernette. Hurry Up, ISBN: 0-590-48615-2

Fraser, Mary Ann. I.Q. Goes to School. ISBN 0-439-57650-4

Gomi, Taro. My Friends, ISBN: 0-590-48615-2

Hale, Sarah Josepha. Mary Had a Little Lamb, ISBN: 0-8234-0509-5

Hallinan, P.K. A Rainbow of Friends. ISBN: 0-8249-5394-0

Hennessy, B.G. School Days, ISBN: 0-590-47224-0

Hill, Eric. Spot Goes to School, ISBN: 0-399-21073-3

Hoffman, Phyllis.  We Play, ISBN: 0-590-44384-4

Holabird, Katharine. Angelina Ballerina, ISBN 10: 1584856556

Hudson, Cheryl Willis and Bernette G. Ford.  Bright Eyes, Brown Skin, ISBN 10: 0940975238


 

Hutchings, Amy and Richard.  Our School Workers, ISBN: 0590638408

Keo, Ena. Friends Go Together, ISBN: 0-8172-8245-9

Korman, Justine. The Grumpy Bunny Goes to School. ISBN: 0-439-64433-X

Kvasnosky, Laura. See You Later, Alligator. ISBN: 0-15-200301-0

Lionni, Leo.  Little Blue and Little Yellow, ISBN: 0-688-13285-5

London, Jonathan. Froggy Goes to School. ISBN: 0-590-06693-5

McCombs, Megan. The Teacher, ISBN: 0-7367-1651-3

Numeroff, Laura. If You Take a Mouse to School. ISBN: 0-06-028328-9

Reys, Margret and H.A. Curious George Goes to School. ISBN: 0-395-51939-X

Rogers, Fred.  Making Friends, ISBN: 0-399-21297-3

Senisi, Ellen B. Kindergarten Kids. ISBN: 0-590-47614-9

Slate, Joseph. Miss Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten. ISBN: 0-590-63567-0

Slater, Teddy. Stay in Line. ISBN: 0-590-22713-0

Torrisi, Cathy.  School Helpers, ISBN: 0-7664-0733-0

Troll Associates.  Let’s Go to School.

Waber, Bernard.  Ira Sleeps Over. ISBN: 0-395-20503-4

Winget, Susan. Tucker’s Best School Day. ISBN-13:978-0-439-90084-3

Ziefert, Harriet. Teachers Are For Reading Stories, ISBN: 0-14-230105-1

Zoehfeld, Kathleen. Pooh’s First Day of School. ISBN: 0-590-28160-7

 

 

Children’s Music CDs and Recordings

 

Dr. Jean Feldman. All Day Long

Dr. Jean Feldman. Keep On Singing and Dancing with Dr. Jean

Dr. Jean Feldman. Is Everybody Happy?

Dr. Jean Feldman. Silly Songs

Dr. Jean Feldman, Kiss Your Brain;

Dr. Jean Feldman, Ole’ Ole’ Ole’

Johnette Downing, Music Time

Greg and Steve. We All Live Together, Volume 5

Jack Hartman and Dr. Becky Bailey. It Starts in the Heart

Jack Hartman and Dr. Becky Bailey. Rhythms and Rhymes