Unit 2-1:  All About Me

Study Focus: Me and My Five Senses

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on the introduction of our body parts and the five senses people use to experience the world around us.

Student Understandings: Students will develop an understanding that our bodies are made up of identifiable parts. Students will recognize that individual people are special and unique. Students will identify feelings. Students will recognize the five senses and how they are used to experience our world.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students name a variety of body parts?
  2. Can students identify ways individuals are special?
  3. Can students recognize a variety of feelings?
  4. Can students identify the five senses and associate them with the correct body parts?
  5. Can students identify which sense is used to complete a given task? (e.g. smell is used to identify scents)

Guiding Vocabulary: body, commonly known body parts such as wrist, elbow, waist, neck, knuckles, ankle, heel, lips, and forehead; commonly known feelings such as angry, frightened, and excited; Smell, Sight, Hear, Taste, Touch

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)


 


 

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 

 

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-14b

Use simple reasoning skills by determining why something happens in a story read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-18

Participate in group-shared writing activities that include rhyming and descriptive words (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-2-E5)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 Study Focus

 

My Body

I Am Special

My Feelings

Sight and Sound

Touch, Smell, and Taste

Whole Group Activities

Brainstorm a chart of body parts

1, 2, or more than 2

ELA 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b,  12c, 14c, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31; M 1, 2, 5, 13; SCI 5, 15, 19

Discussion of ways we are special.

I Like Myself

ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 14c, 16, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; M 13; SS 2, 4

Sometimes I’m Bombaloo

My Feelings

Word Grid

ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b, 14b, 14c, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 5

Sight and Sound

My Five Senses by M. Miller

Sound Word Grid

 ELA 4, 5a, 5d, 6, 8, 9, 11, 14c, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 2, 3, 5, 9, 17

Touch, Smell, and Taste

My Five Senses by Aliki

ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 14c, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 1, 2, 3, 15

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Can you sStand on one foot?

Can you hop 3 times?

Can you clap your hands?

Can you hug a friend?

Can you walk backwards?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography.

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Here Are My Hands by Bill Martin, Jr.

Quick As A Cricket by Audrey Wood

All By Myself by Mercer Mayer

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin, Jr.

The Nose Book by Al Perkins

Small Group Activities

Eye color graph

(alternate offered for less diverse classes)

ELA 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31; M 1, 2, 5, 12; SCI 2, 3, 5

Self Portrait:

“writing” response sheets: ____ is special because ____.

ELA 4, 10, 19, 21, 22, 24, 26

What I Like:

cutting and gluing pictures for a class book

ELA 24; M 11

Patterning Colors:

practice copying, extending, and creating AB patterns

ELA 24, 31; M 9, 13

Cooking Shape Pizzas:

biscuit dough, sauce, cheese, pepperoni

ELA 24; M 8; SCI 3, 18

Music and Movement

Rhythmic body movements: hand clapping, thigh slapping, foot stamping

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Sense walks, guidance counselor, school nurse

 


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

 

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough letters

Letter jars

Dot Letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel Board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations

Recite finger play “I have ten fingers. They all belong to me. I can count them all. Would you like to see?”  Count yours then have the student count his/her fingers.  Students can also do this with a friend.

Measurement

Trace one foot from each student onto individual sheets of construction paper. Label with the student’s name and cut out.  Have each student compare his/her foot to a friend’s. Select a few of the foot cutouts and have students put the paper footprints in order from the shortest to the longest.

Geometry

Use an overhead to trace each student’s profile on construction paper then cut out the silhouette.  Cut different colors of construction paper into small ½” x ½” squares.  Have students identify the shape and glue them to their silhouettes, covering it with squares.

Data Collection BLM Graph:  Which Hand Do You Use When You Write?

Have each student respond to the graph by placing his/her name (write or sticker label) in a column. During a group time/circle time, guide students in interpreting the graph and completing the graph summary sheet.

Patterning

Have students make simple patterns on paper plates with fruit flavored ring cereal. Let them eat their pattern.  As a bonus, have them smell their cereal pieces and guess what flavor it is before they taste it.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24,26, 31

M 6,9,11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

light table and colored translucent materials

thumbprint comparisons

magnifying glasses

sorting materials: rocks, shells, leaves, etc. to sort into baskets

matching activities: textures, sounds, scents,

 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11, 13

SCI 15, 16

SS 4

play hot potato with a bean bag or plastic potato from the Dramatic Play center

listening walk

 


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student made signs and labels

“Me” blocks: Take a full length photo of each student. Cut out the photos and mount on 8.5 x 5.5 inch sheets of cardstock. Laminate the cardstock, cut apart then roll the cardstock to form a 5.5 inch tube, and tape in place. Each tube should have a different student photo on it.); photo blocks of community places

Take photos of familiar places in the neighborhood. Print, laminate and attach the photos onto wooden unit blocks with wide clear tape.

vehicles

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

counters: babies, colored bears, children for sorting and counting.

Provide plastic bowls or laminated sorting mats (paper or cardstock with dividing lines sectioning off areas for sorting) and have students sort/count manipulatives according to their interest and skill level. Ask students to explain their sorting methods by asking questions such as: “Why did you choose to put these bears in this bowl?” “How are they the same?” “How many babies did you put in this bowl?” “Can you count them for me?”

Puzzles of children

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

 

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

“Me” collages,  finger paints with and without added scents/textures

dough with and without added scents; cutters shaped like: people, houses, cars, trees, etc.

 

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

treasure hunt for plastic coins, beads, toys

 

Water:

color mixing

ice cubes

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1,  2,  3,  4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Sound shakers; bells

Some featured songs:

Simon Says, If You’re Happy and You Know It, Sing a Happy Song - Greg and Steve

I Like You, There’s No Doubt About It, Hello, How Are You?, Special Me, If You’re Happy, The More We Get Together, Wiggle Them, Couch Potato Pokey - Dr. Jean


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

dress up clothes;

fabric lengths of various colors and textures for dressing up;

doctors’ office

Grocery Store

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets; flannel board stories; selected books and recordings related to the study focus; fannel board stories; puppets;

magnetic story pieces; class made book: We Are Special

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; stencils; variety of writing tools such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

body part word cards; doctor’s memo or prescription pads

 

Whole Group Activities

Whole Group Activity 1: My Body: (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b,  12c, 14c, 16, 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31; M 1, 2, 5, 13; SCI 5, 15, 19)

 

Materials List: chart markers, My Body word grid, Two Eyes, A Nose, and A Mouth (book); Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes and/or Mother Goonie Bird (music or lyrics)

 

Before the lesson create a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) similar to the one below. Modify your word grid to suit the needs and abilities of the class. Draw or use clip art to represent the words in the word grid.

 

My body has 1:

My body has 2:

My body has more than 2:

Head

 

 

 

Fingers

 

 

 

Nose

 

 

 

Eyes

 

 

 

 

 

Open the lesson with a discussion of the book Two Eyes, A Nose, and A Mouth. Point out the illustrations/pictures and explain that the illustrations are the pictures but the text or words are read to tell the story. Ask questions to generate interest in the book:

            What do you see on the front of the book?

            What do you think this book is about? Why?

Read the title of the story. Ask the class to look at a friend and see that each of us has two eyes, a nose, and a mouth.

            Are all our faces the same?

            How are they the same?

            How are they different?

 

Read the story, pausing along the way for student comments and questions. Point out the things that are the same and different about each face in the book. Encourage students to look for some of the same features on their classmates faces.

 

After reading the story, ask students if their predictions about the story were correct. Tell students that we all have many of the same body parts. We only have one of some parts, two of other parts, and more than two of yet other parts. Complete a word grid of body parts with students. Ask students to name some parts of our bodies of which we only have one (e.g. head, stomach, neck, back, nose, mouth, chin, forehead, bottom). Lead students to name the body parts of which we have two (arms, legs, feet, hands, ears, eyes, etc.) Finally, ask students to think of which body parts we have more than two (teeth, fingers, toes)

 

As students name each body part, list it on the word grid in the appropriate column. After students have named as many body parts as they can, review the word grid. Count how many body parts are in each column. Which column has the most? Which has the least?  Close the group time with a body parts song such as Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes or Mother Goonie Bird.

 

Accommodation: If students seem to be having difficulty naming body parts, provide a model by having a student stand in front of the group and asking leading questions to get them to recognize and name some of the body parts. Teachers may have to name the body part first then lead students to count and identify the body part as being one, two, or more than two. Teachers should be mindful of any students with disabilities such as missing limbs and modify the lesson accordingly.

 

Whole Group Activity 2: I Am Special: (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 14c, 16, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; M 13; SS 2, 4)

 

Materials List: I Like Myself by Karen Beaumont (book); Special Me (music and lyrics from Dr. Jean and Friends CD);

 

Open with the song: Special Me

            Special, special, special me

            I’m as special as can be.

           


 

            There is no one quite like me.

            I’m as good as I can be.

            Special, special, special me.

 

Encourage students to think of one thing, physical or not, that makes them special. Who is the tallest? Who is the shortest? Who has red hair? Who has glasses? Who has a loose tooth? Who can tie shoelaces? Who can ride a bike? Who can skate?

 

Introduce the story, I Like Myself,  a story about a little girl who has lots of things that make her special. Read the story, pausing for student questions and comments. Point out to students that the little girl in the story is proud of herself. How do we know she is proud? What are some of the things she is proud about? What is special about her? 

 

Close with the song: Special Me

 

Accommodation: Some children have difficulty seeing what specific characteristics make them special. You may need to help them by asking guiding questions such as the “Who can…?” and “Who has…?” questions listed above. Sometimes you may need to be very specific (“Who has a new baby sister?”) or very general (“Who loves to swing?”) in order to ensure that every child seizes on something which makes him/her special.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: My Feelings: (GLEs – ELA 4, 5a, 5c, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12b, 14b, 14c, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 5)

 

Materials List: Sometimes I’m Bombaloo by Rachel Vail (book), word grid chart on chart paper, markers

 

Open by showing the cover of the book, Sometimes I’m Bombaloo. Ask students what they think the book is about. Discuss the feelings they think the little girl is experiencing based on the illustrations. Ask students to show their angry face; sad face; happy face; listening face. Read the story, pausing for brief discussions where appropriate. Ask why the little girl was angry in the story.

 

Create a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) by listing emotions across the top and situations down the side. Use clip art or drawings to represent the feelings and situations on the word grid.

Feelings:

Happy

Sad

Angry

Scared

Broken toy

 

 

 

 

Lost

 

 

 

 

Playing with a friend

 

 

 

 

Someone pushes in line

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read each situation in the left hand column of the word grid aloud to the students. Ask them to imagine how they would feel. Would they feel happy, sad, angry or scared in that situation? Put an X in the cell under the emotional response the students agree on. Continue this way until all the situations are done and the word grid is complete. It is okay to have more than one response to a given situation.

 

Closure: Review the word grid and guide students to the realization that we have many different feelings depending on the situations we are in. Talk about how our behavior affects the feelings of those around us and that we all have feelings.

 

Whole Group Activity 4: Sight and Sound (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5d, 6, 8, 9, 11, 14c, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 2, 3, 5, 9, 17)

 

Materials List: My Five Senses by Margaret Miller (book); hand bell; horn; sheet of paper; Velcro; word grid chart

 

Preparation:

Make a large word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) similar to the one below. Add a piece of velcro to the grid in the section that says “velcro”.

Sound

Loud

Soft

Bell

 

 

Paper

 

 

 

 

Horn

 

 

Velcro

 

 

 

 

 

Begin with the fingerplay:

I Have So Many Parts to Me

I have two hands to clap with, (clap)

One nose with which to smell, (sniff)

I have one head to think with, (tap head)

Two lungs that work quite well, (take a deep breath)


 

I have two eyes that let me see, (point to eyes)

I have two legs that walk. (walk in place)

 

My arms are just right for big hugs, (hug yourself)

And my mouth just loves to talk! (point to mouth)

 

Display the front cover of the story. While pointing at the text and moving left to right, read the title and text of  the book, My Five Senses, to the class. Discuss the ways the children in the book experience their world with their sense. Prompt students to recall and name the five senses from the book.

 

Ask students to close their eyes and listen. Ask them to identify any sounds they might hear. Ask if the sounds are loud or soft. Discuss and model loud versus soft sounds so that students understand the difference. Use an athletic whistle to represent loud sounds and a feather falling to represent soft sounds. Model a loud voice and a soft voice.

 

Bring out the sound objects and explain that the students are to listen to the sounds made by each object. Then they are to decide if the object makes a loud sound or a soft sound and tell the teacher so that it can be marked accordingly on the word grid. Complete the word grid for each item. 

 

Leave the word grid and sound items out for students to revisit during centers. Encourage students to find objects in the classroom that make sounds and decide if the sounds are loud or soft.

 

Whole Group Activity 5: Touch and Smell (GLEs: ELA 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 14c, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29; SCI 1, 2, 3, 15)

 

Materials List: My Five Senses by Aliki (book); Feely box; objects for the box: small pine cone, sea shell, feather, sand paper; Surprise Sack; something with an easily recognizable scent (chocolate chip cookie, orange, peppermints)

 

Read the story, My Five Senses by Aliki. Review the five senses from the previous day and today’s story. Tell students that today they will use their sense of touch to discover what is in the feely box. Only one item should be in the box. Let students take turns reaching into the box then making a guess as to what is in the box. Continue until someone guesses correctly or all students have had a turn. Once someone guesses correctly, replace the object with something else before continuing. Explain that our sense of touch allows us to recognize what is in the box even though we can’t see the object.

 

What about smells? Can we use our sense of smell to know what something is even though we can’t see it? Bring out the surprise sack with your choice of aromatic surprise inside. Let students take turns smelling but not looking in the sack. Who can say what is in the surprise sack?

 


 

Close with fingerplay:

I Have So Many Parts to Me

I have two hands to clap with, (clap)

One nose with which to smell, (sniff)

I have one head to think with, (tap head)

Two lungs that work quite well, (take a deep breath)

I have two eyes that let me see, (point to eyes)

I have two legs that walk. (walk in place)

My arms are just right for big hugs, (hug yourself)

And my mouth just loves to talk! (point to mouth)

 

 

Small Group Activities

 

Small Group Activity 1: Eye Color Graph (GLEs: ELA 18, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31; M 1, 2, 5, 12; SCI 2, 3, 5)

 

Materials List:  pre-made poster -“What Color Are Your Eyes?”, pre-cut white paper squares (approximately 2” x 2”), tape, crayons (green, gray, blue, brown), hand mirror, Two Eyes, A Nose, and A Mouth (book)

 

Create a graph on posterboard. The title is “What Color Are Your Eyes?” The number of columns should accommodate the variety of eye colors in your class. Possible eye colors may be: green, gray, blue, brown, hazel. Write the color name and put a picture of an eye of that color at the bottom of each column.

 

Remind students of the story read at whole group, Two Eyes, A Nose, and A Mouth. Tell them we are going to look at our eyes and make a graph to see how many students have each color. Pass the hand mirror around the group and help the students name the color of their eyes. Give each student a white paper square. Have each student use the crayons provided to color the paper square to match his/her own eye color. Be sure to label each square with the student’s name or allow those who are able to write his/her own name. Assist each student in determining which column is the correct one for his/her eye then have him/her use tape to fasten the colored paper square in the column. Repeat this for each student in the class.

 

At the next group time (after small groups), guide the students to interpret the graph data. Remind students of the question by reading the graph title. Ask, “How many children have blue eyes?” Then as a group count the number of student posted eyes are in that column. Ask, “Which eye color has more?” Which has less?” “What color eyes do most of the children in our class have?”

 


 

Accommodation: If your class is not culturally diverse enough for the eye graphing activity to work, you may choose to graph one of the following:

§  Shoe type (laces, Velcro, etc.)

§  Sleeves (long, short)

§  Top with buttons or without buttons

§  Or make up one of your own

 

Small Group Activity 2: Self Portrait (GLEs: ELA 4, 10, 19, 21, 22, 24, 26)

 

Materials List: I Like Myself by Karen Beaumont (book); white paper (1 sheet per student); crayons and/or colored pencils; mirror

 

Remind students of the story and discussion from whole group. Tell them that they are going to tell you what is special about them then draw a picture of themselves on the paper you give them. Write the child’s name on a sheet of white paper or let the child do this if he/she is able. Prompt the child into telling you what he/she thinks is special about himself/herself then write his/her response on the paper. (e.g.  Susie is special because she gives good hugs.) Give the paper to the child and direct him/her to draw a picture of himself/herself. You may need to guide some children by directing them to look at the mirror and draw what they see there. Date each child’s paper and place in his/her portfolio.

 

Accommodation: With some children it may be necessary to ask some leading questions for a response. Some children may not be able to think of something that makes them special so a little teacher guidance may be needed to help them along. Examples: “Can you ride a bike?” “Do you have a pet?” “Do you know how to sing a song?”

 

Small Group Activity 3: What I Like (GLEs: ELA 24; M 11)

 

Materials List: 9 x 12 construction paper (one per child and one for the class book cover); scissors, glue, old magazines and/or sales papers

 

Explain that they are going to make a class book and each person is going to have their own page. Each child will cut out pictures of things he/she likes to glue on his/her page. Be sure to label each child’s page with his/her name or have the child do so if he/she is able.

 

To construct the class book: Create a cover for the book by writing the title: What We Like  by Ms. ___’s Class on one piece of 9 x 12 construction paper and decorating it with pictures of the students or pictures of things they like. Laminate all the pages, including the book cover page. Bind the pages together.

Ideas for binding:

 

Accommodations: Some children may need extra help with using scissors. There are some commercially available training scissors that may be used to help. Note which children seem to be struggling with cutting skills and give them extra opportunities to practice using scissors where they don’t have to cut out anything in particular. Cutting light weight card stock and construction paper is easier than the lighter weight of magazine paper.

 

Small Group Activity 4: Color Bear Patterns (GLEs: ELA 24, 31; M 9, 13)

 

Materials List: colored bear counters; patterning strips (commercial or teacher made)

 

Provide each child with a bowlful of colored bears and a patterning strip. Talk about the patterns on the bear patterning strips. Model “reading” the strips: “red bear, blue bear, red bear, blue bear.” Model copying the pattern with the bear counters. Encourage students to copy the pattern on their own strips. Ask students what they think will come next in the pattern. Encourage students to extend patterns using the bear counters. Always be certain students can copy and extend AB patterns before introducing the idea of more complicated patterns.

 

Small Group Activity 5: Shape Pizzas (GLEs: ELA 24; M 8; SCI 3, 18)

 

Materials List: canned biscuits or English muffins (one per child); pizza sauce; pepperoni; sliced cheese; toaster oven; paper plates; plastic spoons; napkins; spatula; aluminum foil

 

Preparation:

Cut pepperoni into triangle shaped bits

Cut cheese slices into square and rectangle shaped bits

 

Check student records for any allergies for allowing students to handle or eat food.

 

Have students wash their hands with soap and water before coming to the small group area. Explain that they are going to make shape pizzas. Label each piece of foil with a student’s name before giving students a piece of foil as a work mat and a canned biscuit or English muffin. Have students flatten the biscuit or place the English muffin on their foil. Put a teaspoonful of pizza sauce on each pizza. Encourage students to smell the sauce. Point out that they are using their sense of smell. Give each student a few pepperoni triangles and cheese squares and rectangles to put on top of the sauce. Put the pizzas in the toaster oven and bake until the biscuit is lightly browned. While the pizzas are baking, encourage students to watch (eyes/sight), listen (ears/sound), and smell (nose/scent) the baking pizzas. Put the cooked, hot pizzas on paper plates. Remind students that they are hot (which sense tells us this?) and they need to cool before they can be eaten. Cooled pizzas can be eaten as a snack.

 


 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Small Group Activity 2: Collect the Self Portraits for portfolios. These will be a benchmark to assess fine motor, language (oral response to the prompt), and name writing skills.

 

·         Small Group Activity 4: Observe students as they copy and extend with bear counters. Document via photos and/or anecdotal records.

 

 


 

Resources

Children’s Books

Aliki. My Five Senses. ISBN 978-0064450836

Arnold, Tedd. More Parts. ISBN 0-439-53102-0

Arnold, Tedd. Parts. ISBN 0-439-077725-7

Beaumont, Karen. I Like Myself. ISBN 978-0152020132

Bowie, C.W. Busy Toes. ISBN 0-439-17874-6

Carle, Eric. Pancakes, Pancakes! ISBN 0-590-44453-0

Carle, Eric. Today Is Monday. ISBN

Cauley, Lorinda. Clap Your Hands. ISBN 0-698-11428-0

Degan, Bruce. Jamberry. ISBN 978-0874990270

Ehlert, Lois. Eating the Alphabet. ISBN 978-0152009021

Gelman, Rita Golden. More Spaghetti, I Say! ISBN 0-590-45783-7

Hines, Anna Grossnickle. Maybe a Band-aid Will Help. ISBN 0-525-44561-7

Hoban, Russell. Bread and Jam for Frances. ISBN 978-0064430968

Intrater, Roberta. Two Eyes, A Nose, and A Mouth. ISBN 978-0439116800

Julius, Jennifer. I Like Cereal. ISBN

Julius, Jennifer. I Like Potatoes. ISBN 0-516-23059-X

Maccarone, Grace. My Tooth is About to Fall Out. ISBN 0-590-48376-5

Martin, Jr., Bill. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? ISBN 978-0805082661

Martin, Jr., Bill. Here Are My Hands. ISBN 978-0805011685

Marzollo, Jean. How Kids Grow. ISBN 0-590-45062-X

Mayer, Mercer. All By Myself. ISBN 978-0307119384

Mayer, Mercer. Just Going To the Dentist. ISBN 0-307-59873-X

Miller, Margaret. My Five Senses. ISBN 978-0689820090

Morris, Ann. Bread, Bread, Bread. ISBN 978-0688122751

Perkins, Al. The Nose Book. ISBN 978-0375812125

Reys, Margret and H.A. Curious George and the Pizza. ISBN 0-395-39033-8

Reys, Margret and H.A. Curious George Goes to the Dentist. ISBN 0-395-51938-1

Rh Value Publishing. Taryn Goes to the Dentist. ISBN 978-0517561683

Rice, Judith Ann. Those Icky, Sticky, Smelly, Cavity Causing But… Invisible Germs. ISBN

Rice, Judith Ann. Those Mean, No Good, Dirty, Downright Disgusting But… Invisible Germs. ISBN

Sharmat, Mitchell. Gregory, the Terrible Eater. ISBN 0-590-07586-1

Snyder, Inez. Cranberries. ISBN 0-156-25548-7

Snyder, Inez. Oranges. ISBN 0-516-25545-2

Snyder, Inez. Tomatoes. ISBN 0-516-25547-9

Tofts, Hannah. I Eat Fruit! ISBN 1-84089-027-4

Tofts, Hannah. I Eat Vegetables! ISBN 1-84089-028-2

Traditional. The Little Red Hen.

Vail, Rachel. Sometimes I’m Bombaloo. ISBN 978-0439669412

Wood, Audrey. Quick As A Cricket. ISBN 978-0859531511

Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague. How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? ISBN 978-0-545-02739-7

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner. Pooh Plays Doctor (My Very First Winnie the Pooh). ISBN 978-0786843411

 

Recordings/CDs

 

Dr. Jean Feldman. All Day Long

Dr. Jean Feldman. Dr. Jean and Friends

Dr. Jean Feldman. Is Everybody Happy?

Dr. Jean Feldman. Silly Songs

Greg and Steve. We All Live Together Volume 3

Raffi. Singable Songs for the Very Young

Raffi. More Singable Songs for the Very Young

Hap Palmer. Walter the Amazing Worm

Jack Hartman. Follow a Dream

Jack Hartman. Word Fiesta


Unit 2-2:  All About Me

Study Focus: Healthy Habits and Nutrition

Study Focus Description: This study focuses on the introduction of basic healthy habits needed for good health and hygiene.

Student Understandings: Students will develop an understanding of the importance of healthy habits and good hygiene through engagement in age appropriate hands on activities. Students will discuss and practice hand washing and good dental hygiene. Students will learn about good nutrition through the exploration of the food pyramid.

Guiding Questions:

  1. Can students identify healthy habits?
  2. Can students follow correct hand washing procedures?
  3. Can students demonstrate correct tooth brushing technique?
  4. Can students identify the food pyramid and the categories contained within it?
  5. Can students identify healthy foods from each category?

Guiding Vocabulary: healthy habits, germs, soap, cavities, toothpaste, toothbrush, dental floss, hygiene, fruits, vegetables, cereal, grains, dairy, food pyramid, nutrition

Grade-level Expectations

GLE#

GLE Text and Benchmarks

ELA-1a

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating endings of words and nonsense words to make rhyming sounds (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1b

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by  manipulating syllables in spoken words (segment/blend) (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-1d

Demonstrate understanding of phonological awareness by repeating each word in a simple sentence. (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3a

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying own first name in print  (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-3b

Demonstrate understanding of alphabetic principle by identifying at least eight uppercase or lowercase letters, focusing on those in the student’s name (PK-LL-L3) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-4

Orally respond to questions using new vocabulary introduced in conversations, activities, stories, or books (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-1-E1)

ELA-5a

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that a book has a cover and identifying the cover and title of a book.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5b

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by holding a book right side up.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5c

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by differentiating between an illustration and printed text.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)

ELA-5d

Demonstrate understanding of book and print concepts by recognizing that print is read left-to-right and top-to-bottom.  (PK-LL-R3) (ELA-1-E2)


 

ELA-6

Relate pictures to characters (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-7

Role-play using different voices to represent characters in familiar stories (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E4)

ELA-8

Listen to a story and state orally what the story is about (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-L1) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-9

Answer simple questions about a story read aloud (PK-LL-S3) (PK-LL-R4) (ELA-1-E5)

ELA-10

 Share related life experiences after stories are read aloud (PK-LL-L1) (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-11

Orally express thoughts about characters or events in a story (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (PKS-LL-R2) (ELA-1-E6)

ELA-12a

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by sequencing two or three pictures to illustrate events in a story. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12b

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by participating in a group discussion to predict what a book will be about. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-12c

Demonstrate understanding of texts read aloud using a variety of strategies by determining whether the prediction was accurate. (PK- LL-R2) (ELA-7-E1)

ELA-13

Identify problems and solutions in stories that are read aloud (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-7-E2)

ELA-14a

Use simple reasoning skills by identifying reality and fantasy in texts read aloud.  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-14c

Use simple reasoning skills by asking simple questions about a story read aloud (e.g., who, where).  (PF-LL-R1) (PK-LL-R2) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-7-E4)

ELA-15

 Use scribble writing, letter-like forms, dictation, or drawing to represent a word or concept (PK-LL-W1) (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E1)

ELA-16

Orally generate words, ideas, and lists for group writing activities (PK-LL-W3) (ELA-2-E3)

ELA-17

Write informal notes, lists, and letters using scribble writing and/or pictures (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W3) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E4)

ELA-19

Scribble write or draw a picture of a life experience or response to a text read aloud (PK-LL-W2) (PK-LL-W4) (ELA-2-E6)

ELA-20

Demonstrate consistent top-to-bottom formation for letters or letter-like forms (PK-LL-W2) (ELA-3-E1)

ELA-21

Use words, phrases, and/or sentences to express feelings, ideas, needs, and wants (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S2) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-22

Carry on a conversation about a topic, thought, or idea from the classroom, home, or community (PK-LL-S1) (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E1)

ELA-23

Repeat an instruction given orally (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-24

Follow one- and two-step verbal and nonverbal directions (PK-LL-L2) (ELA-4-E2)

ELA-25

Retell part of a favorite story (PK-LL-R2) (ELA-4-E3)

ELA-26

Speak about life experiences or topics of interest (PK-LL-S3) (ELA-4-E4)

ELA-27

Actively participate in role-playing, creative dramatics, finger plays, nursery rhymes and choral speaking (PK-LL-R1) (PK-LL-S2) (PK-LL-L3) (PK-LL-L4) (ELA-4-E5)

ELA-28

Listen and orally respond to questions about media, including music and videos (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-4-E6)


 

ELA-29

Recognize and follow agreed-upon rules for discussing, such as raising one's hand, waiting one's turn, and speaking one at a time (PK-LL-S1) (PK-SE-C1) (ELA-4-E7)

ELA-30

Identify a computer mouse and its purpose (i.e., to navigate the screen) (PK-LL-L5) (ELA-5-E1)

ELA-31

Identify and use information that is formatted in a chart or graph, such as a daily schedule (PK-LL-S1) (ELA-5-E6)

M-1

Count by ones to 10 (PK-CM-N3) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-2

Count a set of 5 or fewer objects by establishing a 1-to-1 correspondence between number names and objects (PK-CM-N2) (N-1-E)

M-3

Identify an object’s position as first or last (PK- -G3) (N-1-E)

M-4

Identify numerals 1 to 5 (PK-CM-N5) (N-1-E) (N-3-E)

M-5

Compare sets of objects using the words same/different and more/less/fewer (PK-CM-N1) CM (N-3-E) (N-7-E)

M-6

Use comparative vocabulary in measurement settings (e.g., long/longer, short/shorter, more/less, hotter/colder, heavier/lighter, bigger/smaller) (PK-CM-M3) (M-1-E) (M-2-E) (M-3-E)

M-7

Use words such as day, week, month, schedule, morning, noon, night (PK-CM-M1) (M-2-E)

M-8

Identify rectangles, squares, circles, and triangles using concrete models (G-2-E)

M-9

Sort concrete objects by an attribute (e.g., shape, size, color) (PK-CM-D1) (G-2-E) (D-1-E)

M-10

Use words that indicate direction and position of an object (e.g., up, down, over, under, above, below, beside, in, out, behind) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E)

M-11

Recognize and manipulate an object’s position in space (e.g., blocks, assembling puzzles) (PK-CM-G3) (G-3-E) (G-4-E)

M-12

Arrange objects or pictures of objects to make an object or picture graph (PK-CM-D2) (D-4-E)

M-13

Recognize and copy repeated patterns (e.g., concrete objects, songs, rhymes, and body movements) (PK-CM-P1) (PK-CM-P2) (P-1-E) (P-3-E)

SCI-1

Ask questions about objects and events in the environment (e.g., plants, rocks, storms) (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-2

Pose questions that can be answered by using students’ own observations and scientific knowledge (PK-CS-I1) (SI-E-A1)

SCI-3

Use the five senses to describe observations (PK-CS-P3) (SI-E-A3)

SCI-4

Select and use developmentally appropriate equipment and tools and units of measurement to observe and collect data (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A4)

SCI-5

Express data in a variety of ways by constructing illustrations, graphs, charts, tables, concept maps, and oral and written explanations as appropriate (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A5) (SI-E-B4)

SCI-6

Use a variety of appropriate formats to describe procedures and to express ideas about demonstrations or experiments (e.g., drawings, journals, reports, presentations, exhibitions, portfolios) (PK-CS-I5) (SI-E-A6)

SCI-7

Identify and use appropriate safety procedures and equipment when conducting investigations (e.g., gloves, goggles, hair ties) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-A7)

SCI-8

Recognize that a variety of tools can be used to examine objects at different degrees of magnification (e.g., hand lens, microscope) (PK-CS-I4) (SI-E-B3)


 

SCI-9

Sort objects using one characteristic (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-10

Determine whether objects float or sink through investigations (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A1)

SCI-11

Describe properties of materials by using observations made with the aid of equipment such as magnets, magnifying glasses, pan balances, and mirrors (PK-CS-P4) (PS-E-A2)

SCI-13

Compare the properties of different solids and liquids through observation (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A4)

SCI-14

Identify components of simple mixtures (e.g., salt/water, rice/beans, iron filings/sand) (PK-CS-P1) (PS-E-A5)

SCI-15

Demonstrate motion by using students’ own bodies (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-16

Explore the motion of objects by using balls, toy cars, or spinning tops (PK-CS-I2) (PS-E-B3)

SCI-17

Identify different sounds as soft or loud (PK-CS-P3) (PS-E-C1)

SCI-18

Identify selected substances as hot or cold (PK-CS-P2) (PS-E-C3)

SCI-19

Identify parts of the body and how they move (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A3)

SCI-21

Distinguish food items from nonfood items (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-A6)

SCI-22

Learn about animals and plants through nonfiction literature (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-23

Observe and care for pets and plants (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-B1)

SCI-24

Describe plants and animals in the schoolyard or home environments (PK-CS-L1) (LS-E-C1)

SCI-25

Explore and describe various properties of rocks, minerals, and soils (PK-CS-L2) (ESS-E-A1)

SCI-26

Describe the weather and its daily changes (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SCI-27

Describe different types of weather students have experienced and give examples of how daily activities and appropriate attire are affected by weather conditions (PK-CS-ES2) (ESS-E-A4)

SS-1

Identify representations of roads, bodies of water, and buildings in play activities  (PK-CSS-G1) (G-1A-E1)

SS-2

Demonstrate an awareness of the world around them (e.g., provide simple information about a trip the student has taken or where the student lives)  (PK-CSS-G3) (G-1A-E2)

SS-3

Identify community workers and their jobs  (PK-CSS-C1) (C-1D-E3) (C-1D-E4)

SS-4

Discuss ways people can help each other (e.g., sharing, paying attention, taking turns)  (PK-SE-C1) (C-1D-E4)

SS-5

Participate in patriotic activities  (PK-CSS-C2) (C-1D-E4)

SS-6

Demonstrate an awareness of the uses of money in play activities  (PK-CSS-E1) (E-1A-E3)

SS-7

Demonstrate an awareness of time by using and responding to such words as yesterday, today, and tomorrow  (PK-CSS-H1) (H-1A-E1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Study Focus

 

Hand Washing

Dental Care

Eating Healthy

Fruits & Veggies

Grains

Whole Group Activities

Hand Washing:

Those Mean Nasty… Germs Story Chain

ELA 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12a, 13, 14c, 16, 21, 22, 24, 26, 27, 29, 31; M 3, 7

Tooth Brushing:

Those Icky, Sticky… Germs

ELA 4, 5a, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14c, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; M 6, 7, 10, 13; SS 3, 7

Healthy Foods/Junk Foods

Gregory, the Terrible Eater

Foods Word Grid

ELA 4, 21, 22, 24, 26, 29, 31; M 9; SCI 5, 9

Eating the Alphabet

ELA 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 22, 26, 27, 29; SCI 1, 3

Bread, Bread, Bread

ELA 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 22, 26, 27, 29

Morning Circle Time

ELA 1d, 3a, 3b, 4, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31;

M 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13;

SCI 26, 27; SS 4, 5, 7

Do you like apples?

Do you like tomatoes?

Do you like oranges?

Do you like broccoli?

Do you like bananas?

Storytime

Suggested alternative story titles are listed in the bibliography

ELA 1a,1b, 1d, 4, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 8,  9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 14c, 25,  29

Pooh Plays Doctor

 

Taryn Goes to the Dentist

Bread and Jam for Frances

Jamberry

The Little Red Hen

Small Group Activities

Hand Washing

Practice

Story chain

ELA 4, 24, 27, 31; M 3, 13

Tooth Brushing

Practice

ELA 4, 24, 31; M 10; SCI 15, 19

 

Sort Foods: Healthy or Junk?

Professor Know It All

ELA 4, 14, 21, 22, 28; SCI 1, 2

Patterning:

Fruit or veggie kabobs

ELA 21, 24, 31; M 3, 11, 13

Bread Tasting Graph

ELA 4, 15, 20, 24, 31; M 2, 5, 12; SCI 2, 3, 5

Music and Movement

Introduce washboard, spoons, gourd shakers, and other food related instruments.

 

 

Field Experiences/

Guest Speakers

Cafeteria manager, dental hygienist, doctor or nurse, tour of dental care facility

 


 

 Study Focus Activities for Learning Centers that can be incorporated into your existing center activities.  Remember any center activity that you can do indoors, could be done outdoors!

Language/Literacy

ELA 3, 15, 17, 20, 24

 

 

Can you find the letter?

Letter symbols

Sand Letters

Letter rubbings

Playdough Letters

Letter jars

Dot Letters

Letter puzzles

 

Gel Board

Letter game

Math

M 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 13

 

Number Relations:

Use 10 mini metal foil pie plates and write numbers one to ten on each plate. Draw the corresponding number of dots for each number on the plate.  Use fruit counters and have students count items into each plate.

Measurement: Measure and weigh real fruits on a balance scale or compare the weight of a real fruit and a plastic fruit of the same type to see which is heavier and which is lighter.

Geometry:

Demonstrate positional words to students by putting a piece of fruit beside/under/in/over a basket. Then have students demonstrate their understanding by having them place the fruit beside/under/in/over the basket according to teacher direction.

Data Collection:

BLM: Fruit Counter Graph

Have students sort a collection of fruit counters onto the graph ,then orally respond to the question at the bottom of the graph.

Patterning:

Have students make simple patterns with fruit counters.  Example apple, orange, apple etc.

Science

SCI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 22, 23, 24, 25,

ELA 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 31

M 6, 9, 11,

SS 4

learning logs and writing tools, nonfiction books relating to current study

real fruits and veggies to sort and examine

toothbrushes and model teeth to brush

food pyramid posters or puzzles

soapy water tub

several soaps with different scents for comparison

 

Gross Motor

ELA 23, 24

M 11,13

SCI 15,16

SS 4

“gym” area; toss plastic or beanbag “fruits” or “veggies” into a bushel basket

play hot potato using a plastic potato or beanbag

 


 

Blocks

ELA 15, 17, 20, 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10,11

SCI 3, 9,16,

SS 1, 2, 4

writing tools, paper, and tape for making student made signs and labels

milk carton and cereal box blocks

rectangular blocks with word SOAP written on them to emphasize rectangle shape

Manipulative/

Table Games

ELA 23, 24

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13

SCI 9

SS 4

Band-aid counting game or band-aid matching:Using real band-aids, create counting and matching games: Put an assortment of matched pairs of band-aids on a tray and have students match them up. For counting, students might use a die or spinner then count out the corresponding number of band-aids.

 

fruit/vegetable manipulatives for sorting and counting mats

 

puzzles with foods, tooth brushing, hand washing, hygiene pictures

Computer

ELA 30

A variety of selected games/activities based on available technology and student needs

http://funschool.kaboose.com/fun-blaster/thanksgiving/games/game_thanksgiving_feast.html?g=arcade/thanksgiving1

http://www.nutritionexplorations.com/kids/activities/challenge.asp?which_game=fueled&came_from=splash

http://www.uptoten.com/kids/boowakwala-family-cooking-sweetandsalty.html

http://www.haelmedia.com/html/sg_m1_001.html

Art

ELA 23, 24

M 5, 6, 8, 9, 10

SCI 3, 13, 14

SS 4

Fingerpaint; veggie and/or fruit printing; toothbrush painting, bar soap drawing on dark paper, sand gluing

 

Sensory

ELA 22, 23, 24

M 5, 6, 10

SCI 2, 3, 10, 13, 14

SS 1, 4

Sand:

plastic fruits and vegetables

Water:

Which veggies sink or float?

soapy water play

Music

ELA 27, 28

M 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 11, 13

SCI 15, 17, 19

SS 4

CD player and CDs, previously introduced musical instruments

Some featured songs:

Brush Your Teeth, Bath Time, I Wonder if I’m Growing - Raffi

A Walking We Will Go, Listen and Move, The Body Rock, Peanut Butter - Greg and Steve:

Fruit and Vegetable Hokey Pokey, Old MacDonald’s Veggie Farm, Water is Important - The Learning Station:

 


 

Dramatic Play

ELA 7, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27

M 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11

SCI 3, 15, 17, 18, 21, 26, 27

SS 2, 4, 6, 7

In addition to the regular housekeeping center, add one or more of the following:

doctors’ office

grocery Store

Books and Listening Center

ELA 1a, 1d, 3a, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12a, 14a, 14c, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29

SS 2, 4

a variety of books and recordings related to the study focus; puppets, flannel board and/or magnetic board figures; class made books

Writing

ELA 3a, 3b, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20

M 11, 13

SS 4

blank books; paper in a variety of colors and sizes; student name cards; stencils; variety of writing tools such as pencils, colored pencils, crayons, markers;

shopping lists; food word cards; supermarket sales circulars;

 

Whole Group Activities

 

Whole Group Activity 1: Introduction to Hand Washing: (GLEs:  ELA 4, 5a, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12a, 13, 14c, 16, 21, 22, 24, 26, 27, 29, 31; M 3, 7)

 

Materials List: Those Mean, No Good, Dirty, Downright Disgusting But… Invisible Germs by Judith Anne Rice (book); hand washing sequence pictures downloaded from http://www.health.state.mn.us/handhygiene/wash/fsgermbuster.pdf; song: Wash Your Hands

 

Prior to the lesson, download the pictures, cut them apart, and laminate for durability.

 

Introduce the book by showing the front cover and reading the title aloud. Read Those Mean, No Good, Dirty, Downright Disgusting But… Invisible Germs to the class. Discuss what Rosa knew and how she got rid of the germs.

 

Ask students why it is so important to wash our hands. Ask them to think of times when one should always wash hands. List their ideas on chart paper or board. (examples may include: before eating, after toileting, after playing outdoors, after sneezing or coughing in your hand, etc.) Display


 

the hand washing sequence pictures. Tell students that it’s also important to wash hands the correct way and the pictures will help us. Using a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions), have a group of children come to the front of the group with each child holding one picture from the hand washing sequence cards. Guide the class in lining up the students holding the cards in the correct order. Have students orally describe the activity depicted on their respective cards. Repeat the activity as desired or until every child has had a turn holding a card.

 

Close by singing the Wash Your Hands song. Explain to students that if they sing this song twice while washing, they will have washed long enough to wash all the germs away.

 

Wash Your Hands

(tune: Row Your Boat)

Wash, wash, wash your hands,

Wash them nice and clean.

Wash them on top,

Wash them on bottom

And fingers in between!

 

Whole Group Activity 2: Introduction to Tooth Brushing: (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14c, 21, 22, 26, 27, 29; M 6, 7, 10, 13; SS 3, 7)

 

Materials List: Those Icky, Sticky, Smelly, Cavity Causing But… Invisible Germs by Judith Anne Rice (book) ; toothbrush, toothpaste, copy of the tooth brushing poster from http://www.colgate.com/BrightSmilesBrightFutures/US/EN/Teachers/ProgramMaterials/PDFs/BrushforBrightminiposter.pdf

 

Introduce the book by showing the front cover and reading the title aloud. Read the story, Those Icky, Sticky, Smelly, Cavity Causing But… Invisible Germs to the class. Ask students, “Who has been to a dentist?” Give students time to share their experiences with brushing teeth and the dentist.

 

Hold up the toothbrush and toothpaste. Ask students to tell you what they know about these things. Refer to the poster to discuss how to correctly brush teeth. Emphasize the importance of taking the time to brush EACH tooth in the front and back so that all the cavity germs are removed. Explain that everyone should brush their teeth at least 2 times every day: every morning before school and every night before going to bed.

 

Close by teaching students this song while pantomiming brushing teeth:

Brush your Teeth

(tune: Row, Row, Row your Boat)

Brush, brush, brush your teeth.

Brush them everyday.


 

Up and down, and round and round.

Scrub the germs away.

 

Note: Many dentists will donate toothbrushes and other materials to be given away to students. Also, there are some nice tooth brushing props available commercially that would enhance this lesson.

 

 

Whole Group Activity 3: Healthy Foods or Junk Foods: (GLEs: ELA 4, 21, 22, 24, 26, 29, 31; M 9; SCI 5, 9)

 

Materials List: Gregory, the Terrible Eater (book), food pyramid poster or download one at http://www.familyfoodzone.com/pdf/educators/little-d/G2%20Pstr%208.5x11.pdf , a variety of foods (real or pretend) from each of the five food groups on the pyramid and several foods that would not be represented on the poster (e.g. chips, candy, soft drinks, etc.), photos or drawings of each of the foods used to create a word grid based on the following pattern:

 

Foods:

Is it a Fruit or a Vegetable?

Is it a Dairy or a Grain?

Is it healthy or unhealthy?

Apple

 

 

 

Candy bar

 

 

 

Crackers

 

 

 

Chips

 

 

 

Coke

 

 

 

Carrot sticks

 

 

 

 

Prior to the lesson, the teacher should construct a word grid (view literacy strategy descriptions) similar to the one above using photos or clip art to represent the foods she/he has chosen for the lesson.

 

Read the story, Gregory, the Terrible Eater, aloud to the class. Talk about how this was a pretend story about eating but in real life people need to eat healthy foods. Display the poster, explaining that for people to grow strong and stay healthy, we must eat healthy foods. The poster shows us what kinds of foods help keep us healthy so we can make better choices when we eat. Talk about how some foods taste good but are not very healthy for us. Ask the students to name some foods they enjoy eating and see if their favorites are on the food pyramid poster.

 

Show students the selection of foods you have brought and the word grid. Explain that they are going to help you decide if the foods you have brought are healthy choices or not healthy choices. They will do this by helping you answer each of the questions on the word grid. If they answer yes to any of the first five questions, then the food is a healthy food. If they answer no to all the questions then the food is not a healthy choice. Hold up each food and have the class answer each question on the word grid. Mark the answers by putting a smile face for yes and a frown face for no in each space on the grid. As the students use the grid to help them see which foods are healthy and which are not healthy, sort the foods into separate piles.

 

To close, ask students to review the word grid with you and name all the healthy foods and all the foods that are not healthy according to the answers given on the word grid.

 

Whole Group Activity 4: Eating the Alphabet (Fruits and Vegetables): (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 12c, 22, 26, 27, 29; SCI 1, 3)

 

Materials List: Eating the Alphabet by Lois Ehlert (book), real apple and carrot that can be cut into bite sized pieces and eaten raw (to be used later for a small group activity), food pyramid poster

 

Out of sight of the students, put one piece of fruit and one piece of vegetable into a sack. Sing to the tune of I’m a Little Teapot:

What’s in the surprise sack?

            Who can tell?

            Maybe it’s a book

            Or maybe it’s a shell.

 

            What’s in the surprise sack?

            Who can see?

            It’s something special

            For you and me!

 

Give clues and encourage students to ask questions that will help them guess what is in the sack. You may want to let students feel and smell the foods in the sack without looking inside.  If no one has guessed what is in the sack within about 3 minutes, go ahead and take the foods out to show the children.

 

Show students the cover of the book, Eating the Alphabet. Ask for predictions about the story based on the front cover of the book. Read the story, pausing for questions and comments where appropriate. After reading the story, ask students if the story was what they were expecting. Ask students to think about all the fruits and vegetables in the story and think of one they like to eat.

 

 

Call students’ attention to the food pyramid poster. Ask them if they recall the poster and what the poster tells us about the foods we eat. Guide students to see the fruits and vegetables sections of the pyramid. Note that the fruits and vegetables sections are both very large parts of the pyramid therefore that means we should eat lots of fruits and veggies because they are very healthy for us.

 

As a closure, give each student a turn to tell one fruit or vegetable he/she likes to eat.

 

Whole Group Activity 5: Bread, Bread, Bread (Cereal/Grains): (GLEs: ELA 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12b, 22, 26, 27, 29)

 

Materials List: Bread, Bread, Bread by Ann Morris (book), a basket with a selection of artificial breads (commercially available), food pyramid poster

 

Display the basket of artificial breads (these are readily available through several companies that sell dramatic play props). Open a discussion about the breads in the basket. What is each one called? Who has eaten that kind of bread?

 

Display the book cover. Ask students to describe the picture on the front of the book and what they think the book may be about. Read the book, pausing where appropriate for comments and questions. As you read the book, hold up the corresponding piece of bread from the basket.

 

After the story, ask students to look at the food pyramid poster and see if they can find breads on it. Point out that breads are at the bottom of the pyramid and hold up the rest of the pyramid, making breads, cereals, and grains a very important part of healthy eating.

 

Small Group Activities

 

Small Group Activity 1: Hand Washing Practice (GLEs – ELA 4, 24, 27, 31; M 3, 13)

 

Materials List: sequence pictures used from story chain activity in whole group; sink with running water; liquid hand soap; paper towels; trash can

 

Review the story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) from whole group activity #1. Model the hand washing sequence shown in the cards.  Emphasize that it’s important to take your time when hand washing and that if you quietly sing the hand washing song twice while you are washing, then you have taken the right amount of time. Then, have each student take a turn practicing the hand washing sequence shown in the pictures while singing the hand washing song. Make sure every child in the class practices and understands the correct procedure for hand washing.

 


Small Group Activity 2: Tooth Brushing Practice (GLEs – ELA 4, 24, 31; M 10; SCI 15, 19)

 

Materials List: toothbrushes, tooth brushing poster, commercially made tooth brushing practice model (large set of teeth and toothbrush); optional: ask a local dentist to donate plaster molds of teeth.

 

Recall the story from whole group activity #2 about the importance of brushing your teeth at least 2 times daily. Discuss the correct strokes for proper tooth brushing: circular motions from top gum to bottom gum, backs and tops of the teeth too. Give each child a turn to practice brushing the model teeth (commercial set or plaster models). If your school does daily tooth brushing, this would be the time for each child to actually practice brushing his/her own teeth and following your classroom procedures for this activity.

 

Small Group Activity 3: Healthy or Junk Food (GLEs – ELA 4, 21, 22, 28; SCI 1, 2)

 

Materials List: food pyramid poster; pretend and/or real foods; professor know-it-all props (insert link here)

 

Explain that one child will be professor know-it-all (view literacy strategy descriptions) while the rest of the group will ask questions about each of the foods. One or two student(s) wear(s) the professor costume props and picks up one of the food items. The other students in the group quiz “professor about the food item. The teacher should assist students in formulating and asking appropriate questions about the food. Examples:

            Is the food a on the food pyramid?

            Is the food a fruit?

            Is the food a vegetable?

            Is the food a dairy food?

            Is the food meat?

            Is the food a grain food?

            Is the food healthy for or is it junk food?

The students who are being “professor should be encouraged to discuss the question before answering it together. Every child should be given the opportunity to be “professor at least once.

 

Note: This activity will be very challenging for young 4 year olds. Teachers should help students come up with appropriate questions. Given lots of opportunities to practice formulating, asking, and answering questions, students will become more capable of doing so on their own.

 


Small Group Activity 4: Fruit Pattern Kabobs (GLEs – ELA 21, 24, 31; M 3, 11, 13)

 

Materials List: paper plates; napkins; wooden skewers; apples; bananas; Fruit Kabobs Patterns BLM (one per student in the small group)

 

Prepare foods by cutting them into approximately 1 inch squares and putting each kind in a separate bowl. Prepare wooden skewers by cutting the length down to about 5 – 6 inches long and blunting the sharp tip by snipping them with scissors. Print and laminate the BLM Fruit Kabob Patterns and cut the pattern strips apart.

 

Be sure to check for allergies before allowing students to handle or eat foods.

 

Have each child wash his/her hands before coming to the table. Explain that we make kabobs by pushing the stick through foods so that the pieces of food are all in a row on the stick. Show students how to carefully push the skewer through a piece of fruit or vegetable. Talk about how each student can make his/her own kabob for a snack but they have to follow the pattern.

 

Display the fruit pattern cards on the table. Using one of the cards and a skewer, model how to copy and extend the pattern on the card with the real fruit pieces to make a fruit kabob.

 

Give each student a paper plate with a few pieces of fruit and a skewer on it. Guide students as they use the pattern card to copy and extend the pattern to fill up the skewer. Allow students to eat their kabobs! Have students to wash their hands after leaving the activity.

 

Small Group Activity 5: Bread Tasting Graph (GLEs – ELA 4, 15, 20, 24, 31; M 2, 5, 12; SCI 2, 3, 5)

 

Materials List: graph (see below); white bread; bagel; croissant; construction paper cut out in the shapes of bread slices, bagels and croissants; tape; What Kind of Bread is Your Favorite? BLM

 

Check student records for food allergies before allowing students to handle or eat any food items.

 

Advance preparation:

Make the graph on a piece of poster board or bulletin board paper

Cut out construction paper bread, bagel, and croissant shapes

(enough for each child to be able to choose their favorite for the graph)

Cut up bite sized portions of each type of bread

 

Have each student wash his/her hands before coming to the small group area. Display the 3 types of bread and the graph. Remind students about the story Bread, Bread, Bread and ask them if they remember seeing these 3 kinds of bread in the story. Remind them of the names of the breads and show them their corresponding pictures/words on the bottom of the graph. Tell students that they are going to taste each kind of bread and decide which one they like the best. Once they decide they can choose a construction paper shape that matches the kind of bread they like best and put it on the graph. Let each student taste and choose their favorite kind of bread. Write each students name on his/her paper bread. Allow those students who are able write their own names. Assist each student in attaching his/her paper bread in the matching column.

 

At the next group gathering, lead a discussion about the graph. Review the question; count the number of students who chose each kind of bread. Talk about which kind of was chosen by more students and which one was chosen by fewer students. Which column has less markers? Which one has more? Etc. Record findings on the recording form (see BLM appendix)

 

 

Sample Assessments

General Guidelines

 

Documentation of student understanding will be recorded by the teacher through observation, notes, and anecdotal records as well as student-generated products. These items will be dated and kept in the form of portfolio assessment.

 

General Assessments

·         Photos, audio tapes, or videotapes to record student behaviors

·         Student products

·         Checklists for recording student behaviors, understanding and skills

·         Teacher observations

·         Anecdotal records

 

Activity-Specific Assessments

 

·         Hand washing activity and sequence: Observe and document students sequencing the steps for hand washing. Observe and document students’ ability to wash their hands following the directions posted in the hand washing chart.

 

·         Fruit Kabob Patterning: Document students’ ability to copy and extend the patterns on the fruit pattern cards.

 

 

 


 

Resources

Children’s Books

Aliki. My Five Senses. ISBN 978-0064450836

Arnold, Tedd. More Parts. ISBN 0-439-53102-0

Arnold, Tedd. Parts. ISBN 0-439-077725-7

Beaumont, Karen. I Like Myself. ISBN 978-0152020132

Bowie, C.W. Busy Toes. ISBN 0-439-17874-6

Carle, Eric. Pancakes, Pancakes! ISBN 0-590-44453-0

Carle, Eric. Today Is Monday. ISBN

Cauley, Lorinda. Clap Your Hands. ISBN 0-698-11428-0

Degan, Bruce. Jamberry. ISBN 978-0874990270

Ehlert, Lois. Eating the Alphabet. ISBN 978-0152009021

Gelman, Rita Golden. More Spaghetti, I Say! ISBN 0-590-45783-7

Hines, Anna Grossnickle. Maybe a Band-aid Will Help. ISBN 0-525-44561-7

Hoban, Russell. Bread and Jam for Frances. ISBN 978-0064430968

Intrater, Roberta. Two Eyes, A Nose, and A Mouth. ISBN 978-0439116800

Julius, Jennifer. I Like Cereal. ISBN

Julius, Jennifer. I Like Potatoes. ISBN 0-516-23059-X

Maccarone, Grace. My Tooth is About to Fall Out. ISBN 0-590-48376-5

Martin, Jr., Bill. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? ISBN 978-0805082661

Martin, Jr., Bill. Here Are My Hands. ISBN 978-0805011685

Marzollo, Jean. How Kids Grow. ISBN 0-590-45062-X

Mayer, Mercer. All By Myself. ISBN 978-0307119384

Mayer, Mercer. Just Going To the Dentist. ISBN 0-307-59873-X

Miller, Margaret. My Five Senses. ISBN 978-0689820090

Morris, Ann. Bread, Bread, Bread. ISBN 978-0688122751

Perkins, Al. The Nose Book. ISBN 978-0375812125

Reys, Margret and H.A. Curious George and the Pizza. ISBN 0-395-39033-8

Reys, Margret and H.A. Curious George Goes to the Dentist. ISBN 0-395-51938-1

Rh Value Publishing. Taryn Goes to the Dentist. ISBN 978-0517561683

Rice, Judith Ann. Those Icky, Sticky, Smelly, Cavity Causing But… Invisible Germs. ISBN

Rice, Judith Ann. Those Mean, No Good, Dirty, Downright Disgusting But… Invisible Germs. ISBN

Sharmat, Mitchell. Gregory, the Terrible Eater. ISBN 0-590-07586-1

Snyder, Inez. Cranberries. ISBN 0-156-25548-7

Snyder, Inez. Oranges. ISBN 0-516-25545-2

Snyder, Inez. Tomatoes. ISBN 0-516-25547-9

Tofts, Hannah. I Eat Fruit! ISBN 1-84089-027-4

Tofts, Hannah. I Eat Vegetables! ISBN 1-84089-028-2

Traditional. The Little Red Hen.

Vail, Rachel. Sometimes I’m Bombaloo. ISBN 978-0439669412

Wood, Audrey. Quick As A Cricket. ISBN 978-0859531511

Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague. How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? ISBN 978-0-545-02739-7

Zoehfeld, Kathleen Weidner. Pooh Plays Doctor (My Very First Winnie the Pooh). ISBN 978-0786843411

Recordings/CDs

Raffi. Singable Songs for the Very Young.

Greg and Steve. Playing Favorites

Greg and Steve. We All Live Together Volume 1

Greg and Steve. We All Live Together Volume 3  

Greg and Steve. We All Live Together Volume 4

Greg and Steve. We All Live Together Volume 5

Greg and Steve. Kids in Motion

Johnette Downing. Music Time

Website Resources

http://www.health.state.mn.us/handhygiene/wash/fsgermbuster.pdf

http://www.colgate.com/BrightSmilesBrightFutures/US/EN/Teachers/ProgramMaterials/PDFs/BrushforBrightminiposter.pdf

http://www.familyfoodzone.com/pdf/educators/little-d/G2%20Pstr%208.5x11.pdf